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עמוד בית Wed, 13.11.19

August 2019


Focus
Maria Infantino MD, Teresa Carbone BD, Mariangela Manfredi BD, Valentina Grossi BD, Maurizio Benucci MD, Miri Blank PhD, Yehuda Shoenfeld MD FRCP MaACR and Nicola Bizzaro MD
Silicone Breast Implant Debate
Yeela Ben Naftali MD, Yoav Barnea MD, Mark W. Clemens MD and Eran Bar-Meir MD

Background: Breast implant-associated anaplastic large cell lymphoma (ALCL) is a rare type of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma that is found around breast implants. ALCL was discovered only two decades ago. In Israel we currently have four diagnosed cases (as of 2018). Until recently, the estimated incidence was 1:300,000 women with breast implants, while recent reports range from 1:3817 to 1:30,000. 

Objectives: To determine the occurrence of breast implant-ALCL in Israel.

Methods: We conducted a retrospective analysis of the four patients diagnosed with ALCL in Israel. Cytology was confirmed and the clinical data was collected. Based on the estimated number of women with breast implants in Israel, a calculation of the true incidence was completed.

Results: The incidence in Israel is significantly higher than the older incidence reports indicate. We estimated that the lifetime prevalence of the disease is 4:60,000 women with a textured breast implant, or 1:15,000 women with a textured breast implant in Israel.

Conclusions: ALCL is not common. We support the claim that the prevalence is significantly higher than what was initially described. This finding has clinical and medicolegal implications that should be addressed accordingly.

Abdulla Watad MD, Nicola Luigi Bragazzi MD PhD MPH, Howard Amital MD MHA and Yehuda Shoenfeld MD FRCP MACR
Nir Bitterman MD, Paula Simoviz MD, Tamar Tadmor MD, Lihi Tzur MD, Noam Calderon MD and Ohad Ben-Nun MD
Valerii G. Zolotykh MD, Anna Y. Kim MD, Yehuda Shoenfeld MD FRCP MACR and Leonid P. Churilov MD PhD
Original Articles
Marina Leitman MD, Yan Topilsky MD, Vladimir Tyomkin MSc, Shemy Carasso MD, Sara Shimoni MD, Sorel Goland MD, Sagit Ben Zekry MD, Alik Sagie MD, Noah Liel Cohen MD, Chaim Yosefy MD and Rоnen Beeri MD

The output settings of echocardiographic systems should be set to the full (original) frame rate and lossless compression (e.g., run-length encoding) in order to transmit echocardiographic videos so that they retain their original quality. In addition, monitors and display cards of echocardiography systems and workstations should be able to support an adaptive refresh rate for displaying video at an arbitrary frame rate, including a high frame rate (90+ fps) without dropping frames and preserving the original frame duration. Currently, the only available option for echocardiography monitors is 144–165 Hz (or higher) based on adaptive frame rate G-Sync or FreeSync technology monitors. These monitors should be accompanied by compatible display cards. Echocardiography systems and workstation video playback software should support G-Sync or FreeSync adaptive frame rate technology to display echocardiography videos at their original frame rates without the effects of jitter and frame drops. Echocardiography systems should support an online display of the videos on the workstations during acquisition with the original quality. The requirements for web-based workstations are the same as for desktops workstations. Hospital digital networks should provide transmission and long-term archiving of the echocardiographic videos in their original acquisition quality.

Michael J. Segel MD, Alexander Kogan MD, Sergey Preissman MD, Nancy Agmon-Levin MD, Aaron Lubetsky MD MSc, Paul Fefer MD, Hans-Joachim Schaefers MD and Ehud Raanani MD

Background: Chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension (CTEPH) is a rare, distinct pulmonary vascular disease, which is caused by chronic obstruction of major pulmonary arteries. CTEPH can be cured by pulmonary endarterectomy (PEA). PEA for CTEPH is a challenging procedure, and patient selection and the perioperative management are complex, requiring significant experience.

Objectives: To describe the establishment of a national CTEPH–PEA center in Israel and present results of surgery.

Methods: In this study, we reviewed the outcomes of PEA in a national referral, multi-disciplinary center for CTEPH–PEA. The center was established by collaborating with a high-volume center in Europe. A multidisciplinary team from our hospital (pulmonary hypertension specialist, cardiac surgeon, cardiac anesthesiologist and cardiac surgery intensivist was trained under the guidance of an experienced team from the European center.

Results: A total of 38 PEA procedures were performed between 2008 and 2018. We included 28 cases in this analysis for which long-term follow-up data were available. There were two hospital deaths (7%). At follow-up, median New York Heart Association (NYHA) class improved from III to I (P < 0.0001), median systolic pulmonary pressure decreased from 64 mmHg to 26 mmHg (P < 0.0001), and significant improvements were seen in right ventricular function and exercise capacity.

Conclusions: A national center for performance of a rare and complex surgical procedure can be successfully established by collaboration with a high-volume center and by training a dedicated multidisciplinary team.

Tal Frenkel Rutenberg MD, Yuval Baruch MD, Nissim Ohana MD, Hanna Bernstine MD, Amir Amitai MD, Nir Cohen MD, Liran Domachevsky MD and Shai Shemesh MD

Background: Implant-related spinal infections are a surgical complication associated with high morbidity. Due to infection, hardware removal may be necessary, which could lead to pseudarthrosis and the loss of stability and alignment.

Objectives: To evaluate the accuracy and diagnostic value of 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron-emission tomography/computed tomography (18F-FDG PET/CT) in the workup of patients with suspected implant-related infections of the spine and to assess the clinical impact of PET/CT results on the management of these infections.

Methods: The study included nine consecutive patients with a history of spinal surgery who underwent PET/CT for evaluation of suspected spinal implant related infection. All imaging studies were performed between January 2011 and December 2013. All 18F-FDG PET/CT scans were performed on an 8 slice PET/CT following an 18F-FDG injection. Images were scored both visually and semi-quantitatively by a radiology expert. Results were compared to additional imaging studies when available, which were correlated to clinical and bacteriological findings allowing calculation of sensitivity, specificity and accuracy.

Results: Among the patients, five experienced hardware-related spinal infection. 18F-FDG PET/CT sensitivity was 80%, specificity 100%, and accuracy 88.9%. One scan produced a false negative; however, a second PET/CT scan revealed an infection.

Conclusions: PET/CT was found to be valuable for the diagnosis of postoperative hardware-related spinal infection, especially when other imaging modalities were uninformative or inconclusive. As such, PET/CT could be useful for management of infection treatment.

Eyal Meltzer MD, Lara Weiss, Mollie Lobl, Eyal Leshem MD and Shmuel Stienlauf MD

Background: Travelers' diarrhea (TD) is frequently encountered in people traveling from high-income to low-income countries; however, its epidemiology in those traveling between high-income countries is not known.

Objectives: To evaluate the incidence of diarrhea in North American students relocating to Israel.

Methods: A retrospective cohort study involving medical students from the United States and Canada relocating to Israel was conducted. Students who relocated to Israel during 2010–2016 were contacted by email to participate in an anonymous survey. Data included demographic information as well as occurrence, timing, duration, and outcome of diarrhea after relocation.

Results: Ninety-seven students participated in the survey. Most (93.7%) students relocated from the United States or Canada. The period-prevalence of diarrhea was 69.1%. The incidence of diarrhea declined from 34.8 cases per 100 student-months during the first month after relocation to 1.3 cases per 100 student-months after 1 year. The duration of diarrhea was up to 1 week in 72.7%. Students who reported diarrhea were younger than students who did not (mean age 24.0 ± 2.2 and 28.4 ± 1.8 years, respectively, P < 0.001). No other demographic parameter was significantly associated with a higher likelihood of diarrhea.

Conclusions: A high proportion of North American medical students relocating to Israel reported diarrhea with clinical and epidemiological features similar to classic TD. Further studies are needed to elucidate the causative agents of TD in Israel.

Khalil Salame MD, Alon Grundshtein MD, Gilad Regev MD, Morsi Khashan MD, Ran Lador MD and Zvi Lidar MD

Spinal manipulation therapy (SMT) is commonly used as an effective therapeutic modality for a range of cervical symptoms. However, in rare cases, cervical manipulation may be associated with complications. In this review we present a series of cases with cervical spine injury and myelopathy following therapeutic manipulation of the neck, and examine their clinical course and neurological outcome. We conducted a search for patients who developed neurological symptoms due to cervical spinal cord injury following neck SMT in the database of a spinal unit in a tertiary hospital between the years 2008 and 2018. Patients were assessed for the clinical course and deterioration, type of manipulation used and subsequent management. A total of four patients were identified, two men and two women, aged 32–66 years. In three patients neurological deterioration appeared after chiropractic adjustment and in one patient after tuina therapy. Three patients were managed with anterior cervical discectomy and fusion while one patient declined surgical treatment. Assessment for subjective and objective evidence of cervical myelopathy should be performed prior to cervical manipulation, and suspected myelopathic patients should be sent for further workup by a specialist familiar with cervical myelopathy (such as a neurologist, a neurosurgeon or orthopedic surgeon who specializes in spinal surgery). Nevertheless, manipulation therapy remains an important and generally safe treatment modality for a variety of cervical complaints. This review does not intend to discard the role of SMT as a significant part in the management of patients with neck related symptoms, rather it is meant to draw attention to the need for careful clinical and imaging investigation before treatment.

Reviews
Yulia Treister-Goltzman MD and Roni Peleg MD

The Bedouins living in southern Israel are a Muslim-Arab population that is transitioning from a nomadic lifestyle to life in permanent settlements. The population has unique characteristics that could affect hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) measurements. The objective of this study was to describe the socio-demographic and unique morbidity characteristics of this community and their effect on HbA1c measurements. Consanguinity, especially among cousins in the Bedouin population, results in a high prevalence of autosomal recessive genetic diseases such as thalassemia (underestimate of HbA1c), hemoglobinopathies (underestimate and overestimate), Gilbert’s disease, and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency, an X-linked disorder, which can cause hyperbilirubinemia with an overestimate of HbA1c. Furthermore, nutritional deficiencies, autosomal recessive diseases, high birth rates, parasitic infections, and poverty can all cause high rates of anemia (iron and vitamin B12 deficiencies) that can raise HbA1c levels. Congenital dyserythropoietic anemia is found among Bedouin tribes in the Negev region and can lead to an underestimation of HbA1c levels. Pregnancy can also affect HbA1c levels. Medical teams working in the Bedouin community and in other Muslim populations with similar morbidity characteristics throughout the world should identify patients with medical conditions that can affect HbA1c measurements and be aware of possible measurement alternatives such as fructosamine and glycated albumin.

Case communications
Richard Haber MB BS (Hons) FRACP and George M. Weisz MD FRACS BA MA
Amir Naeh MD, Ilan Bruchim MD, Mordechai Hallak MD and Rinat Gabbay-Benziv MD
Levente Bodoki MD PhD, Edit Végh MD, Zoltán Szekanecz MD PhD and Gabriella Szűcs MD PhD
Conference Summary
Anibal Antonio Cruz Senzano MD and Carla Marina Cruz Rocha
Baruch Levi PhD, Malke Borow JD, Leah Wapner JD LLM and Zeev Feldman MD

Global trends, such as the population aging, the increase of chronic morbidity, soaring costs of healthcare services, and work overload in hospitals raise the need to find innovative solutions for providing quality medical services. One solution adopted by healthcare systems around the world is "home hospitalization," that is, providing an array of necessary health services in the patient's home, instead of in the hospital department. The aim of this focus article is to explore the spread of home hospitalization worldwide and examine the challenges and pathways for its adoption and implementation. Many countries, including the United States, Canada, the United Kingdom, and Australia, operate home-based hospitalization programs. In Israel, the service is in its infancy, but in view of the extreme workload and the high mortality rate from infections in acute care hospitals, home hospitalization has recently gained public interest and political support, which may encourage its further development.

Letters
Tamar Laron-Kenet MD, Aviva Silbergeld MSc, Pearl Lilos BSc and Zvi Laron MD PhD (hc)
Mitchell J. Schwaber MD MSc, Azza Vaturi RN MHA, Bina Rubinovitch MD, Debby Ben-David MD, Ester Solter RN MHA and Yehuda Carmeli MD MPH
הבהרה משפטית: כל נושא המופיע באתר זה נועד להשכלה בלבד ואין לראות בו ייעוץ רפואי או משפטי. אין הר"י אחראית לתוכן המתפרסם באתר זה ולכל נזק שעלול להיגרם. כל הזכויות על המידע באתר שייכות להסתדרות הרפואית בישראל. מדיניות פרטיות
ז'בוטינסקי 35 רמת גן, בניין התאומים 2 קומות 10-11, ת.ד. 3566, מיקוד 5213604. טלפון: 03-6100444, פקס: 03-5753303