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עמוד בית
Tue, 23.07.24

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October 2010
Z. Feldbrin, D. Hendel, A. Lipkin, D. Zin and L. Schorr

Background: Open repair of the Achilles tendon is still the gold standard for treating rupture. This technique has the disadvantage of a long and problematic operative scar and thickly scarred Achilles tendon. To improve the surgical outcome minimally invasive techniques have been developed.

Objectives: To analyze our results of Achilles tendon repair using the Achillon® device and compare them with published studies.

Methods: We performed surgical repair of the Achilles tendon in 28 patients during a 4 year period (2004–2008): 14 patients were treated with the Achillon device, 12 with the open suture technique and 2 with the percutaneous method. Fourteen patients were available for follow-up: the tendon was repaired in 9 patients with the Achillon device, in 3 patients with open suturing and in 2 patients with the percutaneous technique. Follow-up ranged from 1 to 4 years.

Results: The average score of the AOFAS Ankle-Hindfoot Scale for the group treated with the Achillon device was 95.6 points (range 84–100) and for the group treated with the open method, 90 points (range 84–98). The length of the scar in patients operated with a minimally invasive technique was 3.81 cm (range 1–6 cm) as compared to 9.16 cm (range 8–10.5 cm) with the open suture.

Conclusions: This is the first review on this procedure in Israel. Excellent functional results were achieved with this technique. Our outcomes were similar to those of two other studies.
 

January 2009
I.R. Makhoul, H. Sprecher, R. Sawaid, P. Jakobi, T. Smolkin, P. Sujov, I. Kassis and S. Blazer

Background: According to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control guidelines, prolonged rupture of membranes mandates intrapartum antimicrobial prophylaxis for group B Streptococcus whenever maternal GBS[1] status is unknown.

Objectives: To evaluate the local incidence, early detection and outcome of early-onset GBS sepsis in 35–42 week old neonates born after PROM[2] to women with unknown GBS status who were not given intrapartum antimicrobial prophylaxis.

Methods: During a 1 year period, we studied all neonates born beyond 35 weeks gestation with maternal PROM ≥ 18 hours, unknown maternal GBS status and without prior administration of IAP[3]. Complete blood count, C-reactive protein, blood culture and polymerase chain reaction amplification of bacterial 16S rRNA gene were performed in blood samples collected immediately after birth. Unfavorable outcome was defined by one or more of the following: GBS bacteremia, clinical signs of sepsis, or positive PCR[4].

Results:  Of the 3616 liveborns 212 (5.9%) met the inclusion criteria. Only 12 (5.7%) of these neonates presented signs suggestive of sepsis. PCR was negative in all cases. Fifty-eight neonates (27.4%) had CRP[5] > 1.0 mg/dl and/or complete blood count abnormalities, but these were not significantly associated with unfavorable outcome. Early-onset GBS sepsis occurred in one neonate in this high risk group (1/212 = 0.47%, 95% CI 0.012–2.6). 

Conclusions: In this single-institution study, the incidence of early-onset GBS sepsis in neonates born after PROM of ≥ 18 hours, unknown maternal GBS status and no intrapartum antimicrobial prophylaxis was 0.47%.

 






[1] GBS = Group B Streptococcus



[2] PROM = prolonged rupture of membranes



[3] IAP = intrapartum antimicrobial prophylaxis



[4] PCR = polymerase chain reaction



[5] CRP = C-reactive protein



 
December 2008
A. Hadary, I. Dashkovsky, A. Rapaport, J.C. Cozakov

Background: Non-traumatic rupture of the spleen is a rare condition. It can occur in a pathological spleen caused by any of a variety of diseases. For yet unknown reasons this condition may sometimes involve an apparently normal spleen as well.

Objectives: To examine the incidence, symptoms, causes, therapy and prognosis of "spontaneous" splenic rupture.

Methods: We conducted a retrospective study of seven patients diagnosed with splenic rupture not related to any traumatic event, who had been treated in the surgical department of a community hospital within the last 19 years.

Results: The male to female ratio was 5:2. In some patients, no background disease that could explain increased friability of splenic tissue could be identified. In some cases, where hemodynamic stability and absence of peritoneal signs afforded observation, splenectomy was delayed. In one case it was avoided altogether.

Conclusions: “Spontaneous” rupture of spleen should be suspected when abdominal symptomatology occurs against a background of an acute infectious disease, especially in young males, or a disease known to affect target organs of the reticular endothelial system. Preoperative use of imaging studies in hemodynamically stable patients can sometimes obviate surgery, or in cases of massive hemoperitoneum reduce intraoperative time.

February 2007
A. Blankstein, A. Israeli, I. Dudkiewicz, A. Chechik, A. Ganel

Background: When encountering complaints of pain in the area of Achilles tendon with a suspected lesion, the clinician seldom reaches a precise diagnosis based only on X-ray and clinical examination. Ultrasonography is useful for evaluating the pathology and treatment.

Objectives: To assess the relative contribution of real-time intraoperative ultrasound examination and immediate postoperative ultrasound in patients with acute rupture of the Achilles tendon treated by percutaneous suture method. The combination of both procedures provides a unique advantage that could facilitate better results.

Methods: Ultrasound examination was used in 20 patients with acute rupture of the Achilles tendon who were treated surgically. Intraoperative as well as postoperative ultrasound examinations were performed in 5 patients whereas 15 patients underwent an immediate postoperative ultrasound.

Results: Ultrasound pathologies were found in all patients. Percutaneous surgical correction of ruptured Achilles tendon with accurate positioning of the foot using real-time sonography was successful in all the patients.

Conclusion: As in many other soft tissue lesions, ultrasonography is a useful tool for evaluating the pathology and for planning the surgical correction of ruptures in the Achilles tendon.

 
 

November 2004
M. Leitman, V. Shir, E. Peleg, S. Rosenblatt, E. Sucher, R. Krakover, E. Kaluski and Z. Vered

Background: Cardiac rupture is a rare but ominous complication of myocardial infarction.

Objectives: To study the clinical presentation, medical course, outcome and echocardiographic predictors of patients with myocardial rupture.

Methods: We evaluated 15 consecutive patients with cardiac rupture during a 4 year period in our department. The current report explores the presence of potential risk factors, timing, relation to the thrombolysis, coronary interventions and outcome.

Results: The index event in all patients was first ST elevation myocardial infarction. In seven patients rupture occurred in the first 24 hours. Pericardial effusion on admission with a clot was present in three patients. Five patients received thrombolytic therapy. Only three patients underwent coronary angioplasty, but in one case it was performed late and in two patients the culprit artery could not be opened. Six patients reached the operating room, of whom three survived.

Conclusions: The lack of early mechanical reperfusion in acute myocardial infarction and thrombolytic therapy are risk factors for cardiac rupture. Pericardial effusion on admission and evidence of a clot are echocardiographic indicators of cardiac rupture and should alert the medical team to further assess the possibility of cardiac rupture.
 

January 2004
D. Goitein, O. Goitein and A. Pikarsky
September 2001
Daniel Schapira, MD, DSc, Alexandra Balbir-Gurman, MD, Alicia Nachtigal, MD and Abraham Menachem Nahir, MD, PhD
July 2000
Shlomo Shimonovitz MD, Anda Botosneano MD and Drorith Hochner-Celnikier MD

Background: Uterine rupture is a catastrophic obstetric complication, most often associated with a preexisting cesarean section scar. Although a vaginal birth after a cesarean is considered safe in modern obstetrics, it is not known whether repeated VBACs increase the risk of rupture, or whether the first VBAC proves the strength and durability of the scar, predicting further successful and less risky vaginal deliveries.

Objectives: To evaluate the effect of repeated vaginal deliveries on the risk of uterine rupture in women who have previously delivered by cesarean section.

Methods: In this retrospective study, 26 VBAC deliveries complicated by uterine rupture were matched for age, parity, and gravidity with 66 controls who achieved VBAC without rupture. The histories, demography, pregnancy, labor and delivery records, as well as neonatal outcome were compared.

Results: We found that the risk of rupture decreases dramatically in subsequent VBACs. Of the 40 cases of uterine rupture recorded during the 18 year study period, 26 occurred during VBAC deliveries. Of these, 21 were complicated first VBACs. We also found that the use of prostaglandin-estradiol, instrumental deliveries, and oxytocin had been used significantly more often during deliveries complicated with rupture than in VBAC controls.

Conclusions: Once a woman has achieved VBAC the risk of rupture falls dramatically. The use of oxytocin, PGE2 and instrumental deliveries are additional risk factors for rupture, therefore caution should be exerted regarding their application in the presence of a uterine scar, particularly in the first vaginal birth after cesarean.

___________________________________

 

VBAC= vaginal birth after cesarean section

PGE2= prostaglandin-estradiol

Jonathan Cohen, FCP (S.A) Maury Shapiro, MD, Elad Grozovski, MD, Menashe Haddad, MD, Nissim Hananel, MD and Pierre Singer, MD,
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