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עמוד בית
Sun, 26.05.24

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January 2019
Moran Livne Margolin MD, Nona Zeitlin MD, Yehudit Eden Friedman MD, Opher Globus MD and Meir Mouallem MD
May 2018
Yehudit Eden Friedman MD, Gabriela Gayer MD, Moran Livne Margolin MD, Abraham Kneller MD and Meir Mouallem MD
October 2010
H. Duskin-Bitan, S. Kivity, D. Olchovsky, G. Schiby, D. Ezra and M. Mouallem

Background: Kikuchi-Fujimoto disease is a benign and self-limited disease, first reported in Japan in 1972. The characteristic features of this disorder include lymphadenopathy and fever.

Objectives: To summarize our experience with Kikuchi disease with regard to clinical manifestations and outcome.

Methods: The patients included in the study were those diagnosed with Kikuchi disease during the years 2005–2008 in two departments of internal medicine at Sheba Medical Center.

Results: We identified five patients with Kikuchi disease; four of them were women and the mean age was 22.6 years. All the patients had cervical lymphadenopathy; three had other sites of lymphadenopathy. Four of the patients had fever higher than 39ºC. Two of them had splenomegaly and three reported weight loss. Three of the five patients experienced a relapse of the disease and were treated with steroids or non-steroidal anti-inflammatory agents. The diagnosis was confirmed in all the patients by an excisional biopsy of lymph node.

Conclusions: Kikuchi disease must be considered in every young patient with fever and lymphadenopathy. The disease usually has a benign course.

October 2003
M. Mouallem, T. Sirotin and Z. Farfel
October 1999
Peretz Weiss MD, Meir Mouallem MD, Rafael Bruck MD, David Hassin MD, Amir Tanay MD, Chaim M. Brickman MD, Zvi Farfel MD and Simon Bar-Meir MD
 Background: Nimesulide is a relatively new non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug that is gaining popularity in many countries because it is a selective cyclooxygenase 2 inhibitor. Occasionally, treatment is associated with mild elevation of liver enzymes, which return to normal upon discontinuation of the drug. Several cases of nimesulide-induced symptomatic hepatitis were also recently reported, but these patients all recovered.

Objectives: To report the characteristics of liver injury induced by nimesulide.

Patients and Methods: We report retrospectively six patients, five of them females with a median age of 59 years, whose aminotransferase levels rose after they took nimesulide for joint pains. In all patients nimesulide was discontinued, laboratory tests for viral and autoimmune causes of hepatitis were performed, and sufficient follow-up was available.

Results: One patient remained asymptomatic. Four patients presented with symptoms, including fatigue, nausea and vomiting, which had developed several weeks after they began taking nimesulide (median 10 weeks, range 2–13). Hepatocellular injury was observed with median peak serum alanine aminotransferase 15 times the upper limit of normal (range 4–35), reversing to normal 2–4 months after discontinuation of the drug. The remaining patient eveloped symptoms, but continued taking the drug for another 2 weeks. She subsequently developed acute hepatic failure with encephalopathy and hepatorenal syndrome and died 6 weeks after hospitalization. In none of the cases did serological tests for hepatitis A, B and C, Epstein-Barr virus and cytomegalovirus, as well as autoimmune hepatitis reveal findings.

Conclusions: Nimesulide may cause liver damage. The clinical presentation may vary from abnormal liver enzyme levels with no symptoms, to fatal hepatic failure. Therefore, monitoring liver enzymes after initiating therapy with nimesulide seems prudent.

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