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עמוד בית
Thu, 18.04.24

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July 2023
Alexander Ioscovich MD, Dmitry Greenman MD, Ilya Goldin MD, Sorina Grisaru-Granovsky MD PhD, Yaacov Gozal MD, Boris Zukerman MD, Fayez Khatib MD, Aharon Tevet MD

Background: Morbidly adherent placentation (MAP) increases the risk for obstetric hemorrhage. Cesarean hysterectomy is the prevalent perioperative approach. Resuscitative endovascular balloon occlusion of the aorta (REBOA) is a minimally invasive and relatively simple endovascular procedure to temporarily occlude the aorta and control below diaphragm bleeding in trauma. It has been effectively used to reduce obstetric hemorrhage.

Objectives: To evaluate whether REBOA during cesarean delivery (CD) in women with morbidly adherent placentation is a safe and effective treatment modality.

Methods: We introduced REBOA for CD with antepartum diagnosis of MAP in 2019 and compared these patients (RG) to a standard approach group (SAG) treated in our center over the preceding year, as a control. All relevant data were collected from patient electronic files.

Results: Estimated blood loss and transfusion rates were significantly higher in SAG; 54.5% of SAG patients received four RBC units or more vs. one administered in RG. No fresh frozen plasma, cryoprecipitate, or platelets were administered in RG vs. mean 3.63, 6, and 3.62 units, respectively in SAG. Ten SAG patients (90.9%) underwent hysterectomy vs. 3 RG patients (30%). Five SAG patients (45%) required post-surgical intensive care unit (ICU) admission vs. no RG patients. Bladder injury occurred in five SAG cases (45%) vs. 2 RG (20%). One RG patient had a thromboembolic event. Perioperative lactate levels were significantly higher in SAG patients.

Conclusions: Use of REBOA during CD in women with MAP is safe and effective in preventing massive bleeding, reducing the rate of hysterectomy, and improving patient outcome.

April 2023
Gad Shaked MD, Yoav Bichovsky MD, Guy Golani MD, Adi Segal BMedSc, Ilia Replyanski MD, Moti Klein MD, Yair Binyamin MD, Amit Frenkel MD MHA

Background: Massive, non-compressible bleeding is a leading cause of preventable trauma mortality. Resuscitative Endovascular Balloon Occlusion of the Aorta (REBOA) is a minimally invasive procedure in which a balloon catheter is maneuvered into the aorta to temporarily occlude large vessels and enable stabilization of the exsanguinating patient.



Objectives: To present experiences in assimilating REBOA at a single level 1 trauma center in Israel, to evaluate the technical aspects of the procedure, and to describe patient characteristics and outcomes.


Methods: This retrospective cohort study comprised civilians admitted with hemorrhagic shock to our trauma department who were treated with REBOA between November 2017 and July 2021. Descriptive statistics of the patients, characteristics of the injuries and patient outcomes are presented.


Results: The study included 22 patients (median age 30.1 years, 21 male). The mean systolic blood pressure (SBP) before REBOA inflation was 59.6 ± 11.4 mmHg, and the mean SBP measured after the procedure was 115.2 ± 26.3 mmHg. In 20 patients (91%), the SBP was normalized (> 90 mmHg) shortly after inflation of the balloon, and they survived the treatment in the trauma department; 15 (75%) survived the first 30 days.



Conclusions: REBOA is an effective method for the initial resuscitation and hemorrhage control of patients with massive, non-compressible bleeding and is relatively easy to assimilate in a hospital. The achievement of immediate normalization of SBP enables medical personnel to correct physiological parameters and obtain accurate imaging before proceeding to the operating theater.

January 2021
Daniel Silverberg MD, Haitam Hater MD, Hakam Sonqrot MD, Daniel Raskin MD, Boris Khaitovich MD, and Moshe Halak MD

Background: Patients with critical limb ischemia (CLI) involving the below-the-knee (BTK) arteries are at increased risk of limb loss. Despite improvement in endovascular modalities, it is still unclear whether an aggressive approach results in improved limb salvage.

Objectives: To assess whether an aggressive approach to BTK arterial disease results in improved limb salvage.

Methods: A comparative study of two groups was conducted. Group 1 included patients treated between 2012 and 2014, primarily with transfemoral angioplasty of the tibial arteries. Group 2 included patients treated between 2015–2019 with a wide array of endovascular modalities (stents, multiple tibial artery and pedal angioplasty, retrograde access). Primary endpoint was freedom from amputation at 4 years.

Results: A total of 529 BTK interventions were performed. Mean age was 71 ± 10.6 years, 382 (79%) were male. Patients in group 1 were less likely to be taking clopidogrel (66% vs. 83%, P < 0.01) and statins (72 % vs. 87%, P < 0.01). Several therapeutic modalities were used more often in group 2 than in group 1, including pedal angioplasty (24 vs. 43 %, P = 0.01), tibial and pedal retrograde access (0 vs. 10%, P = 0.01), and tibial stenting (3% vs. 25%, P = 0.01). Revascularization of two or more tibial arteries was performed at a higher rate in group 2 (54% vs. 50%, P = 0.45). Estimated freedom from amputation at 40 months follow-up was higher in group 2 (53% vs. 63%, P = 0.05).

Conclusions: An aggressive, multimodality approach in treating BTK arteries results in improved limb salvage.

January 2020
Daniel Silverberg MD, Ahmad Abu Rmeileh MD, Daniel Raskin MD, Uri Rimon MD and Moshe Halak MD

Background: Endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) of abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA) is associated with decreased perioperative morbidity and mortality.

Objectives: To report the outcomes of EVAR among patients older than 80 years of age.

Methods: In this retrospective study, we reviewed patients older than 80 years of age who underwent elective EVAR at our institution between 2007 and 2017. The demographics, perioperative morbidity and mortality, and long-term results are reported.

Results: During the study period, 444 patients underwent elective EVAR for AAAs. Among them 128 patients (29%) were > 80 years of age. Mean age was 84 ± 3.4 (range 80–96) years, and 110 patients (86%) were male. The EVAR was technically successful in 127 patients (99%) and there were intraoperative mortalities. Within 30 days of the surgery, nine patients (7%) died. Major and minor adverse events occurred in 26 (20%) and 59 (46%) patients, respectively. Factors associated with increased risk of perioperative morbidity and mortality included chronic kidney disease, peripheral artery disease, and the existence of three or more co-morbidities.

Conclusions: EVAR in the elderly can be performed with a high rate of success; however, it is associated with a substantial rate of morbidity and mortality, particularly when patients present with multiple co-morbidities. When performing EVAR in this population group, the risk of rupture must be considered opposed to the life expectancy of these patients and the risk of perioperative morbidity and mortality.

July 2018
Yuval Cavari MD, Victor Ginzburg MD, Gabriel Szendro MD, Anatoly Leytzin MD, Evelin Novik Farkash MD and Isaac Lazar MD
May 2017
Inbal Fuchs MD, Jonathan Taylor, Anna Malev MD and Victor Ginsburg MD
August 2015
June 2015
Eitan Heldenberg MD, Igor Rabin MD, Amir Peer MD Rebekah Karplus MD, and Arie Bass MD
May 2014
Eyal Lotan MD MSc, David Orion MD, Mati Bakon MD, Rafael Kuperstein MD and Gahl Greenberg MD
January 2014
Daniel Silverberg, Violeta Glauber, Uri Rimon, Yakubovitch Dmitry, Emanuel- Ronny Reinitz, Basheer Sheick-Yousif, Boris Khaitovich, Jacob Schneiderman and Moshe Halak
Background: Surgery for complex aortic aneurysms (thoracoabdominal, juxtarenal and pseudoaneurysms) is associated with a high morbidity and mortality rate. Branched and fenestrated stent grafts constitute a new technology intended as an alternative treatment for this disease.

Objectives: To describe a single-center experience with fenestrated and branched endografts for the treatment of complex aortic aneurysms.

Methods: We reviewed all cases of complex aortic aneurysms treated with branched or fenestrated devices in our center. Data collected included device specifics, perioperative morbidity and mortality, re-intervention rates and mid-term results.

Results: Between 2007 and 2012 nine patients were treated with branched and fenestrated stent grafts. Mean age was 73 years. Mean aneurysm size was 63 mm. Perioperative mortality was 22% (2/9). During the follow-up, re-interventions were required in 3 patients (33%). Of 34 visceral artery branches 33 remained patent, resulting in a patency rate of 97%. Sac expansion was seen in a single patient due to a large endoleak. No late aneurysm- related deaths occurred.

Conclusions: Branched and fenestrated stent grafts are feasible and relatively safe alternatives for the treatment of complex aortic aneurysms involving the visceral segment. Further research is needed to determine the long-term durability of this new technology. 

December 2013
Daniel Silverberg, Tal Yalon, Uri Rimon, Emanuel R. Reinitz, Dmitry Yakubovitch, Jacob Schneiderman and Moshe Halak
 Background: Peripheral arterial occlusive disease is common in patients with chronic renal failure requiring dialysis. Despite the increasing use of endovascular revascularization for lower extremity ischemia, the success rates of treating lower extremity ischemia in this challenging population remain obscure. 

Objectives: To assess the results of endovascular revascularization for lower extremity ischemia in dialysis patients.

Methods: We conducted a retrospective review of all dialysis patients who underwent endovascular treatment for critical limb ischemia (CLI) in our institution between 2007 and 2011. Data collected included comorbidities, clinical presentation, anatomic distribution of vascular lesions, amputation and survival rates.

Results: We identified 50 limbs (41 patients). Indications included: gangrene in 22%, non-healing wounds in 45%, rest pain in 31%, and debilitating claudication in 4%. Mean follow-up was 12 months (1–51 months). Nineteen patients required amputations. Freedom from amputation at 5 years was 40%. Factors associated with amputation included non-healing wounds or gangrene (68% and 36% respectively) and diabetes (P < 0.05). The survival rate was 80% after 5 years.

Conclusions:  Despite improvement in endovascular techniques for lower extremity revascularization, the incidence of limb salvage among dialysis patients remains poor, resulting in a high rate of major amputations. 

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