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עמוד בית
Mon, 22.07.24

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April 2024
Afik Tibi MD, Ziyad Khamaysi MD, Emily Avitan-Hersh MD PhD

Background: Group A Streptococcus (GAS) causes a wide spectrum of acute infections and immune-related diseases, most of which include a dermatological presentation. However, dermatological findings have a wide range of other possible etiologies. The diagnosis of GAS-related disease requires an indication of preceding GAS infection by direct culture or by measuring antistreptolysin O (ASLO) titer.

Objectives: To explore the correlation between ASLO positivity and dermatological diseases.

Methods: We analyzed clinical data from all cases of patients over 18 years of age who underwent ASLO testing between the years 2016 and 2020 in the Department of Dermatology at Rambam Health Care Campus.

Results: Of 152 adult patients with ASLO tests, 100 had diagnoses that were potentially related to streptococcal infection. Vasculitis and psoriasis were the most suspected diagnoses. Positive ASLO test was found in 44 (29%) patients. The diagnoses showing the highest ratio of positive ASLO were psoriasis (60%), erythema nodosum (46%), skin infections (43%), Sweet syndrome (33%), and vasculitis (15%). Psoriasis types included plaque psoriasis (8 patients), guttate psoriasis (3 patients), and palmoplantar pustulosis and erythroderma (2 patients each).

Conclusions: Although the applicability of ASLO for the spectrum of dermatological diseases remains unclear, our results enhance the practical relevance of the test. We showed a higher prevalence of positive ASLO tests in psoriasis and erythema nodosum cases and a lower prevalence in vasculitis. Notably, ASLO was positive in all psoriasis subtypes, suggesting high utility of the test for psoriasis.

July 2023
Moran Drucker Iarovich MD, Yael Inbar, MD, Sara Apter MD, Eli Konen MD MHA, Eyal Klang MD, Marrianne Michal Amitai MD

Background: Perivascular cuffing as the sole imaging manifestation of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is an under-recognized entity.

Objectives: To present this rare finding and differentiate it from retroperitoneal fibrosis and vasculitis.

Methods: Patients with abdominal vasculature cuffing were retrospectively collected (January 2011 to September 2017). We evaluated vessels involved, wall thickness, length of involvement and extra-vascular manifestations.

Results: Fourteen patients with perivascular cuffing were retrieved: three with celiac and superior mesenteric artery (SMA) perivascular cuffing as the only manifestation of surgically proven PDAC, seven with abdominal vasculitis, and four with retroperitoneal fibrosis. PDAC patients exhibited perivascular cuffing of either or both celiac and SMA (3/3). Vasculitis patients showed aortitis with or without iliac or SMA cuffing (3/7) or cuffing of either or both celiac and SMA (4/7). Retroperitoneal fibrosis involved the aorta (4/4), common iliac (4/4), and renal arteries (2/4). Hydronephrosis was present in 3/4 of retroperitoneal fibrosis patients. PDAC and vasculitis demonstrated reduced wall thickness in comparison to retroperitoneal fibrosis (PDAC: 1.0 ± 0.2 cm, vasculitis: 1.2 ± 0.5 cm, retroperitoneal fibrosis: 2.4 ± 0.4 cm; P = 0.002). There was no significant difference in length of vascular involvement (PDAC: 6.3 ± 2.1 cm, vasculitis: 7.1 ± 2.6 cm, retroperitoneal fibrosis: 8.7 ± 0.5 cm).

Conclusions: Celiac and SMA perivascular cuffing can be the sole finding in PDAC and may be indistinguishable from vasculitis. This entity may differ from retroperitoneal fibrosis as it spares the aorta, iliac, and renal arteries and demonstrates thinner walls and no hydronephrosis.

March 2023
Sergei Elber-Dorozko MD, Yackov Berkun MD, Abraham Zlotogorski MD, Alexander Maly MD, Ariel Tenenbaum MD

IgA vasculitis, formerly known as Henoch–Schönlein purpura (HSP), is the most common systemic vasculitis in children. It is defined as palpable purpura in the absence of coagulopathy or thrombocytopenia and one or more of the following criteria: abdominal pain, arthritis or arthralgia, biopsy of affected tissue demonstrating predominant IgA deposition, and renal involvement with proteinuria and hematuria or red cell casts [1].

January 2023
Amir Dagan MD, Elsa Sebag MD

A 64-year-old male, with antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody-associated vasculitis was being treated with methotrexate and low dose prednisone. He arrived at the clinic with bluish discoloration of the toes. Inflammatory markers and urine were normal. No history of chilblains or Raynoud's phenomena was noted. He recovered recently from mild coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). A diagnosis of COVID toes (COVID digits) was made [Figure 1].

November 2022
Shada Azem MD, Roy Raphael MD, Shir Raibman-Spector MD, Kobi Faierstein MD, Amir Givon MD, Haim Mayan MD

Intravesicular administration of Bacillus Calmette–Guérin (BCG), a live attenuated strain of Mycobacterium bovis, has long been used as adjuvant therapy for treatment of non-muscle invasive bladder carcinoma. BCG is usually well tolerated; however, infectious complications can range from 1–5% of cases. Infectious complications of BCG [1] can be divided into localized disease, which is considered a late onset disease occurring 3 months following treatment such as cystitis, Epididymo-orchitis, and pyelonephritis. Another form is a systemic disease, which is an early onset manifestation including sepsis syndrome that usually occurs directly after treatment and is the most common form of disseminated BCG infection.

April 2022
Daniel Erez MD, Zamir Dovrish MD, Tanya Zahavi MD, Keren Cohen-Hagai MD, and Ze'ev Korzets MD
February 2022
Itamar Feldman MD, Yigal Frank MD, Ayman Natsheh MD, and Gabriel S. Breuer MD
October 2021
Orr Yahal MD, Yael Halavy MD, Asaf Vivante MD, Noah Gruber MD, Irit Tirosh MD, and Omer Bar-Yosef MD
July 2021
Nir Stanescu MD, Keren Wood MD, Tal Greenberg MD, Marina Maklakovski MD, Avi Rubinov MD, and Amir Dagan MD
June 2021
Omer Gendelman MD, Yuval Kuntzman MD, Ora Shovman MD, Pnina Langevitz MD, Avishai M. Tsur MD MHA, Daniel Erez MD, Yair Levy MD, and Howard Amital MD MHA

Background: Granulomatosis with polyangiitis (GPA) is a rare small vessel vasculitis. It usually involves the respiratory tract and kidney. Rarely, tumor-resembling inflammatory changes ensue.

Objectives: To report three unique cases of GPA presenting with tumor-like lesions in various organs.

Methods: We presented three cases of GPA. Case 1 presented with typical upper respiratory symptoms of GPA and a mediastinal mass. Case 2 presented with low back pain, a large retroperitoneal mass, and nodular skin lesions. Case 3 presented with epigastric pain and a paravertebral inflammatory mass.

Results: The patients were treated successfully with rituximab.

Conclusions: Clinicians should be aware of this presentation of granulomatosis with polyangiitis, which is known as Tumefaction Wegener’s granulomatosis

June 2020
Oren Biham BMedSc, Aviya Kedmi BMedSc, Mohamad Abo Sbet MD and Lior Zeller MD
August 2019
Levente Bodoki MD PhD, Edit Végh MD, Zoltán Szekanecz MD PhD and Gabriella Szűcs MD PhD
July 2019
Doron Rimar MD, Ori Rimar MD, Itzhak Rosner MD, Michael Rozenbaum MD, Lisa Kaly MD, Nina Boulman MD and Gleb Slobodin MD
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