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עמוד בית
Sat, 18.05.24

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April 2024
Roy Apel MD, Slava Bard MD, Ari Naimark MD, Nikolai Menasherov MD PhD, Nir Wasserberg MD, Ory Wiesel MD

Hiatal hernia is defined as a protrusion of abdominal contents through the hiatal foramen into the thoracic cavity. Etiology is presumed to be a congenital malformation, trauma, or iatrogenic like prior surgical dissection of the hiatus during surgery for esophageal or gastric etiology. Age, sex, hormonal changes, body habitus (i.e., kyphosis, scoliosis), and increased body weight are key risk factors. Most hiatal hernias are asymptomatic and discovered incidentally. Surgical repair of hiatal hernia is indicated in symptomatic patients with dysphagia, weight loss, respiratory symptoms such as aspirations, and recurrent pneumonia events [1]. Complications arising from laparoscopic repair of hiatal hernia are generally minor and do not typically necessitate surgical intervention. Major complications include pneumothorax, splenic laceration, esophageal rupture, and pericardial injury. Other complications include recurrence of hernia, vagal nerve injury, gastroesophageal reflux disease, and gastroparesis. The utilization of mesh in repair procedures introduces additional complications such as mesh migration and mesh infection. Previously reported recurrence rates following the repair of a hiatal hernia with mesh range from 10–30%. In this case communications, we presented a case involving the early recognition and treatment of postoperative cardiac tamponade.

June 2023
Mustafa Gabarin MD, Yoav Arnson MD, Yoram Neuman MD, Ziad Arow MD, Abid Assali MD, David Pereg MD

Background: Direct oral anticoagulants (DOACs) are the treatment of choice for patients with non-valvular atrial fibrillation; however, bleeding risk remains significant. We reported a single-center experience with 11 patients who presented with hemorrhagic cardiac tamponade while treated with DOACs.

Objectives: To evaluate the characteristics and clinical outcomes of patients under DOACs with cardiac tamponade.

Methods: We retrospectively identified 11 patients treated with DOACs admitted with pericardial tamponade in our cardiology unit during 2018–2021.

Results: The mean age was 84 ± 4 years; 7 males. Atrial fibrillation was the indication for anticoagulation in all cases. DOACs included apixaban (8 patients), dabigatran (2 patients), and rivaroxaban (1 patient). Urgent pericardiocentesis via a subxiphoid approach under echocardiography guidance was successfully performed in 10 patients. One patient was treated with urgent surgical drainage with a pericardial window. Reversal of anticoagulation using prothrombin complex concentrate and idarucizumab was given before the procedure to 6 patients treated with apixaban and one patient treated with dabigatran. One patient, initially treated with urgent pericardiocentesis, underwent pericardial window surgery due to re-accumulation of blood in the pericardium. The pericardial fluid analysis demonstrated hemopericardium. Cytology tests were negative for malignant cells in all cases. Discharge diagnoses regarding the cause of hemopericardium included pericarditis (3 patients) and idiopathic (8 patients). Medical therapy included non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (1 patient), colchicine (3 patients), and steroids (3 patients). No patient died during hospitalization.

Conclusions: Hemorrhagic cardiac tamponade is a rare complication of DOACs. We found good short-term prognosis following pericardiocentesis.

December 2021
Benjamin Russell MD, Yoram Klein MD, Uri Rimon MD, Zehavit Kirshenboim MD, Nir Horesh MD, and Yaniv Zager MD
June 2018
Adi Guy MD, Corey Saperia, Mohammed S. Yassin MD and Howard Amital MD MHA
April 2011
V. Feldman, Z. Dovrish, N. Weisenberg, Y. Neuman and H. Amital
September 1999
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