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עמוד בית
Sat, 22.06.24

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October 2010
Z. Feldbrin, D. Hendel, A. Lipkin, D. Zin and L. Schorr

Background: Open repair of the Achilles tendon is still the gold standard for treating rupture. This technique has the disadvantage of a long and problematic operative scar and thickly scarred Achilles tendon. To improve the surgical outcome minimally invasive techniques have been developed.

Objectives: To analyze our results of Achilles tendon repair using the Achillon® device and compare them with published studies.

Methods: We performed surgical repair of the Achilles tendon in 28 patients during a 4 year period (2004–2008): 14 patients were treated with the Achillon device, 12 with the open suture technique and 2 with the percutaneous method. Fourteen patients were available for follow-up: the tendon was repaired in 9 patients with the Achillon device, in 3 patients with open suturing and in 2 patients with the percutaneous technique. Follow-up ranged from 1 to 4 years.

Results: The average score of the AOFAS Ankle-Hindfoot Scale for the group treated with the Achillon device was 95.6 points (range 84–100) and for the group treated with the open method, 90 points (range 84–98). The length of the scar in patients operated with a minimally invasive technique was 3.81 cm (range 1–6 cm) as compared to 9.16 cm (range 8–10.5 cm) with the open suture.

Conclusions: This is the first review on this procedure in Israel. Excellent functional results were achieved with this technique. Our outcomes were similar to those of two other studies.
 

June 2010
R. Beigel, D. Oieru, O. Goitein, P. Chouraqui, M.S. Feinberg, S. Brosh, E. Asher, E. Konen, A. Shamiss, M. Eldar, H. Hod, J. Or and S. Matetzky

Background: Many patients present to the emergency department with chest pain. While in most of them chest pain represents a benign complaint, in some patients it underlies a life-threatening illness.

Objectives: To assess the routine evaluation of patients presenting to the ED[1] with acute chest pain via the utilization of a cardiologist-based chest pain unit using different non-invasive imaging modalities.

Methods: We evaluated the records of 1055 consecutive patients who presented to the ED with complaints of chest pain and were admitted to the CPU[2]. After an observation period and according to the decision of the attending cardiologist, patients underwent myocardial perfusion scintigraphy, multidetector computed tomography, or stress echocardiography.

Results: The CPU attending cardiologist did not prescribe non-invasive evaluation for 108 of the 1055 patients, who were either admitted (58 patients) or discharged (50 patients) after an observation period. Of those remaining, 445 patients underwent MDCT[3], 444 MPS[4], and 58 stress echocardiography. Altogether, 907 patients (86%) were discharged from the CPU. During an average period of 236 ± 223 days, 25 patients (3.1%) were readmitted due to chest pain of suspected cardiac origin, and only 8 patients (0.9%) suffered a major adverse cardiovascular event.

Conclusions: Utilization of the CPU enabled a rapid and thorough evaluation of the patients’ primary complaint, thereby reducing hospitalization costs and occupancy on the one hand and avoiding misdiagnosis in discharged patients on the other.

 

[1] ED = emergency department

[2] CPU = chest pain unit

[3] MDCT = multidetector computed tomography

[4] MPS = myocardial perfusion scintigraphy

October 2009
Y. Senecky, D. Inbar, G. Diamond, L. Basel-Vanagaite, S. Rigler and G. Chodick

Background: Fetal alcohol spectrum disorder is a range of disabilities caused by gestational exposure to alcohol. FASD[1] is the leading cause of preventable mental retardation and developmental disability in the United States, with an incidence of 1–10 per 1000 live births. FASD in Israel has yet to be examined systematically.

Objectives: To evaluate professionals’ experience, awareness and knowledge of FASD in Israel and their awareness of maternal consumption of alcohol, and to collect epidemiological data on the syndrome in Israel.

Methods: A short questionnaire was sent to all 43 program directors of genetic institutes (n=14) and child developmental centers in Israel (n=29). Four questions related to their experience and knowledge of FASD. The epidemiological survey included data from all 17 hospitals in Israel and from the two main health management organizations within the public health care system.

Results: The response rate was 98% (n=42). A total of 38.1% of respondents reported having diagnosed at least one case of FASD and fewer than 10% of respondents stated that the knowledge regarding FASD among physicians in Israel was adequate. Developmental pediatricians were more likely to have diagnosed at least one case as compared to geneticists. During the period 1998–2007 the diagnosis of FASD appeared in the records of only 4 patients from the total number of 17 hospitals in Israel. During the same period only six patients were diagnosed at the HMO[2] within the public health care system.

Conclusions: Despite the accumulated knowledge on FASD in many countries and the increase in alcohol consumption in Israel, professionals' awareness of its potential damage is limited. Educational programs to increase physician awareness should accompany publicity campaigns warning the public of the dangers associated with alcohol consumption during pregnancy.






[1] FASD = fetal alcohol spectrum disorder



[2] HMO = health management organization


September 2009
G. Gal and R. Gross; G. Chodiak and Y. Senecky; D. Lakstein; G. Volpin
August 2009
S. Ariad, I. Lipshitz, D. Benharroch, J. Gopas and M. Barchana

Background: Hodgkin’s lymphoma is a distinct primary solid tumor of the immune system that shows wide variation in incidence among different geographic regions and among various races. It was previously suggested that susceptible people living in certain parts of Israel had a higher risk of HL[1] because of exposure to unidentified environmental factors in these regions. Compared with other parts of Israel, these regions were characterized by a higher proportion of Israeli-born Jews.

Objectives: To study time trends in the incidence rate of HL in Israeli-born Jews of all age groups during the years 1960–2005.

Results: A total of 4812 Jewish cases of HL were reported to the Israel Cancer Registry during the study period 1960–2005. There has been a persistent increase in the age-standardized incidence rate of HL, all subtypes pooled, in Israeli-born Jews in both men and women. The age distribution pattern in both genders was bimodal in all periods. The highest incidence was observed in the 20–24 year age group: for women (9.13 per 100,000 per year) during the period 1988–1996, and for men (6.60 per 100,000 per year) during the period 1997–2005.

Conclusions: The reported incidence level of HL in Israeli-born young adult Jews in Israel has increased in recent years to high levels compared with other western countries. Our findings suggest a cohort effect to unidentified factors affecting Israeli-born young adult Jews in Israel.






[1] HL = Hodgkin’s lymphoma


S. Godfrey, C. Springer and E. Bar-Yishay
April 2009
E. Bar-Yishay, E. Matyashchuk, H. Mussaffi, M. Mei-Zahav, D. Prais, S. Hananya, G. Steuer and H. Blau

Background: The forced oscillation technique is a non-invasive and effort-independent technique and is well suited for lung function measurement in young children. FOT[1] employs small-amplitude pressure oscillations superimposed on normal breathing. Therefore, it has the advantage over conventional lung function techniques in that it does not require patient cooperation for conducting respiratory maneuvers.

Objectives: To test the feasibility of the FOT test in preschool children and to compare the results to the commonly used spirometry before and after the administration of bronchodilator therapy.

Methods: Forty-six children (median age 4.9 years, range 1.8–18.3) attending the Pulmonary Clinic at Schneider Children's Medical Center tried to perform FOT and routine spirometry. Results were retrospectively analyzed. 

Results: Of the 46 children 40 succeeded in performing FOT and only 29 succeeded in performing simple spirometry. All but one of the 32 children aged 4 years and above (97%) could perform both tests. Nine of 14 children (64%) aged 4 and less could perform the FOT but only 3 (21%) could perform spirometry. Baseline values of respiratory resistance measured at 6 Hz (R6) negatively correlated with body length (r2 = 0.68, P < 0.005). Twenty-four children performed both tests before and after bronchodilator therapy. A significant concordance was found between the measured responses to bronchodilators by FOT and spirometry (P < 0.01). Only one child had a negative response by FOT but a positive response by spirometry.

Conclusions: The FOT is a simple, non-invasive technique that does not require subject cooperation and thus can be utilized for measuring lung function in children as young as 2 years of age. Furthermore, the FOT was shown to reliably measure response to bronchodilator therapy.






[1] FOT = forced oscillation technique



 
January 2009
A. Dortort Lazar, O. Shpilberg, M. Shaklai and O. Bairey

Background: There is currently no standard salvage chemotherapy for the 40–50% of patients with non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma who fail first-line treatment.

Objectives: To review the experience of a major tertiary medical center with DVIP (dexamethasone, etoposide, ifosfamide and cisplatin) salvage therapy for primary refractory/relapsing NHL[1].

Methods: We reviewed the records of all patients with NHL who received DVIP salvage therapy during the period 1993 to 2005.

Results: We identified 37 adult patients (mean age 56.3 years): 29 with aggressive lymphoma and 8 with indolent lymphoma. Mean event-free survival was 13.5 months (range 0–82 months), mean time between diagnosis and DVIP treatment 18.5 months (range 2–101), and mean number of DVIP cycles 1.9. Four patients (11%) achieved a complete response and 9 (24%) a partial response (overall response 35%). Consolidation with stem cell transplantation was used in 14 patients with aggressive lymphoma and 4 with indolent lymphoma; 14 patients, all with aggressive lymphoma, responded (12 complete, 2 partial). Of the 10 patients who underwent SCT[2] despite no response to salvage DVIP, 6 achieved a complete response. Five year overall survival from diagnosis for the whole sample was 39.4 ± 8.7%, and 5 year post-DVIP overall survival 37.6 ± 8.0%. On multivariate analysis, SCT was the strongest predictor of survival (relative risk 0.73, P < 0.0001) followed by a high score on the International Prognostic Index (RR[3] 3.71, P = 0.032).

Conclusions: DVIP salvage therapy for NHL was associated with a low response rate of 35% but a 5 year post-DVIP survival rate of 37.6%. Patients who are refractory to salvage treatment with DVIP might still be salvaged with SCT.






[1] NHL = non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma



[2] SCT = stem cell transplantation



[3] RR = relative risk



 
Y. Senecky, G.Chodick, G. Diamond, D. Lobel, R. Drachman and D. Inbar

Background: Studies from many countries have reported an increasing prevalence of autistic spectrum disorder in childhood. No comprehensive epidemiological studies of ASD[1] have been performed in Israel.

Objectives: To describe time trends in the reported number of patients with ASD in Israel and to characterize the demographic features of the reported patients.

Methods: We reviewed the charts of the National Insurance Institute of Israel from 1972 to 2004 for all children with a diagnosis of ASD receiving disability benefits.

Results: A total of 3509 children met the study criteria. Eighty percent were boys and 98% were Jewish. The incidence data showed an increase in the number of cases from zero in 1982–84 and 2 (1.2 per million capita under 18 years) in 1985 to a high of 428 cases in 2004 (190 per million).

Conclusions: This is the first comprehensive study of the incidence of ASD in Israel. According to data derived from official health records, the rate of occurrence of ASD has substantially increased in the last 20 years. Further studies are needed to determine if this is a true increase or if the findings were confounded by external factors, such as recent improvements in diagnostic measures and social stigmas.






[1] ASD = autistic spectrum disorder



 
September 2008
Y. Bloch and A. Toker

Background: Children report various types of fear in the context of hospitalization, such as fear of separation from the family, having injections and blood tests, having to stay in the hospital for a long time, and being told “bad news” about their health.

Objectives: To examine the effects of the “Teddy Bear Hospital” method on preschool children’s fear of future hospitalization.

Methods: The study group comprised 41 preschool children aged 3–6.5 years (mean 5.1 ± 0.7 years), and 50 preschool children, age matched and from a similar residential area, served as the control group. Assessment included a simple one-item visual analog scale of anxiety about hospitalization. This was assessed individually one day prior to the intervention and again a week after the intervention in both groups

Results: While baseline levels of anxiety were not different between groups [t(89) = .4, NS], children in the “Teddy Bear Hospital” group reported significantly lower levels of anxiety than the control group at follow-up

Conclusions: Our results indicate that by initiating a controlled pain-free encounter with the medical environment in the form of a “Teddy Bear Hospital,” we can reduce children’s anxiety about hospitalization.

April 2008
S. Atias, S. Mizrahi, R. Shaco-Levy and A.Yussim

Background: In contrast to the relative scarcity of donor kidneys and hearts, the potential supply of deceased donor pancreata is exceeding the demand. However, this potential organ surplus is not being fully realized because in current transplantation practice the duration of pancreas storage before transplantation is limited and many organs with established or anticipated cold ischemia time exceeding 8–10 hours are discarded owing to the extreme vulnerability of pancreatic tissue to anaerobic damage caused by preservation.

Objectives: To reduce cold ischemic injury in order to increase the utilization of donor pancreases in Israel for whole-organ and cell transplantation.

Methods: We evaluated a novel two-layer preservation oxygenated cold storage method that uses perfluorocarbon to continuously supply oxygen to the pancreas during preservation in conventional University of Wisconsin solution.

Results: Pancreatic tissue morphology, viability and adenosine-triphosphate content were serially examined during preservation of the pig pancreas for 24 hours either by a two-layer or by conventional simple cold storage. Already after 12 hours of storage, the superiority of the two-layer method over the University of Wisconsin method was apparent. Starting at this time point and continuing throughout the 24 hours of preservation, the tissue architecture, mitochondrial integrity, cellular viability and ATP[1] tissue concentration were improved in samples preserved in oxygenated UW[2]/PFC[3] as compared to controls stored in conventional UW solution alone.

Conclusions: The UW/PFC two-layer preservation method allowed tissue ATP synthesis and amelioration of cold ischemic tissue damage during extended 24 hour pancreas preservation. This method could be implemented in clinical practice to maximize utilization of pancreata for whole-organ and islet transplantation as well as for pancreas sharing with remote centers.






[1] ATP = adenosine-triphosphate

[2] UW = University of Wisconsin

[3] PFC = perfluorocarbon


October 2007
Y. Talmon, P. Gilbey, R. Falah, A. Samet, H. Cohen and J. Khoury
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