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עמוד בית
Tue, 16.07.24

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March 2013
A. Ber and D.S. Seidman
 Background: The insertion of a levonorgestrel-releasing intrauterine system (LNG-IUS) requires experience and is associated with a low failure rate.

Objectives: To assess the reasons given by gynecologists why they failed to insert a LNG-IUS.

Methods: We obtained data from the sole distributor in Israel that prospectively recorded these cases when contacted by gynecologists following an insertion failure.

Results: The mean rate of failed insertions was 0.95% (range 0.77–1.03%) for the 5 year study period 2006–2010. The most common reasons reported by gynecologists for LNG-IUS insertion failure were loss of sterility of the device, inability to insert the device due to a stenotic cervical canal, accidental removal of the device following a successful insertion due to hasty removal of the inserter or the use of blunt scissors, and removal of the newly inserted LNG-IUS following ultrasound evidence that it was misplaced.

Conclusions:  Gynecologists should be aware of the common pitfalls associated with insertion of an LNG-IUS. Several techniques that may aid in avoiding these mishaps are described.

July 2010
D.S. Seidman, A. Yeshaya, A. Ber, I. Amodai, I. Feinstein, I. Finkel, N. Gordon, N. Porat, D. Samuel, E. Shiran-Makler and I. Wolman

Background: Continuous use of combined oral contraceptives is currently attracting growing interest as a means of improving menstrual related symptoms and reducing the number of bleeding days.

Objectives: To evaluate bleeding patterns, menstrual symptoms and quality of life with an extended 84/7 oral contraceptive regimen versus 21/7 cycles.

Methods: In two consecutive run-in cycles, 30 µg ethinyl estradiol and 3 mg drospirenone tablets taken on days 1–21 were followed by a tablet-free period from days 22 to 28 of each cycle and then by two 84 day cycles of pill use with a 7 day tablet-free interval. The primary outcome was the total number of bleeding/spotting days. Secondary outcomes were severity of daily symptoms, general well-being determined by the PGWBI questionnaire, and overall treatment satisfaction.

Results: Of the 137 women invited to participate in the study 109 (aged 18–40 years) were enrolled. The number of bleeding days decreased by about one-third from a calculated 31.8 days of bleeding under a cyclic 21/7 regimen to an expected total of 21.8 days for the extended 84/7 regimen. The incidence of menorrhagia, intermenstrual bleeding, dysmenorrhea, abdominal bloating, breast tenderness, depressive moods and irritability – when compared at enrollment and at the end of the second extended study period – was significantly lower (P < 0.005) among women on the continuous pill regimen. The median (range) global PGWBI scores were not substantially different before and after the extended use cycles: 78.2 (39.1–96.4) and 77.3 (30.9–96.4), respectively. Body weight and skin condition also remained constant. At the completion of the study: 65.5% of the women were either highly satisfied (41.4%) or satisfied (24.1%) with the extended regimen.

Conclusions: The extended 84/7 regimen was found to be satisfactory for the majority of participants and was associated with a decrease in the number of bleeding days and an improvement in menstrual symptoms compared to 21/7 cycles.
 

 

 
 

 

June 2010
A. Itsekson, D. Shepshelovich, A. Kanevsky and D.S. Seidman
Background: Non-invasive screening tests may allow early diagnosis and prompt treatment, thereby potentially reducing morbidity and mortality and reducing costs for the community.  This may be especially important for gynecologic pathologies that are difficult to promptly diagnose, such as endometriosis or ovarian cancer.

Objectives: To evaluate the reliability of measuring skin resistance using the Medex Test for screening and diagnosis of gynecologic pathologies in a blinded single-center study.

Methods: We enrolled 150 patients: 59 with a functional disorder and 91 with an organic disease. Measurements were carried out in all patients and the results were analyzed separately by a second physician who was blinded to the patients’ diagnosis.

Results: A high correlation was found between the clinical diagnosis and the results of the measurement of electrical skin resistance, with a specificity of 76.3% (45/59) for functional disorders and a sensitivity of 85.7% (78/91) for organic disorders, positive predictive value of 84.8% (78/92) and negative predictive value 77.6% (45/58). The kappa value for the results was 0.622, representing a value much better than expected randomly.

Conclusions: The Medex Test has a good specificity and a high sensitivity for the diagnosis of gynecologic disorders. Further prospective studies are needed to validate these preliminary findings.

March 2002
Zeev Rotstein, MD, MHA, Rachel Wilf-Miron, MD, MPH, Bruno Lavi BA, Daniel S. Seidman, MD, MMSc, Poriah Shahaf, MD, MBA, Amir Shahar, MD, MPH, Uri Gabay, MD, MPH and Shlomo Noy, MD, MBA

Background: The emergency department is one of the hospital’s busiest facilities and is frequently described as a bottleneck. Management by constraint is a managerial methodology that helps to focus on the most critical issues by identifying such bottlenecks. Based on this theory, the benefit of adding medical staff may depend on whether or not physician availability is the bottleneck in the system.

Objective: To formulate a dynamic statistical model to forecast the need for allocating additional medical staff to improve the efficacy of work in the emergency department, taking into account patient volume.

Methods: The daily number of non-trauma admissions to the general ED[1] was assessed for the period 1 January 1992 to 1 December 1995 using the hospital computerized database. The marginal benefit to shortening patient length of stay in the ED by adding a physician during the evening shift was examined for different patient volumes. Data were analyzed with the SAS software package using a Gross Linear Model.

Results: The addition of a physician to the ED staff from noon to midnight significantly shortened patient LOS[2]: an average decrease of 6.61 minutes for 80–119 admissions (P<0.001). However, for less than 80 or more than 120 admissions, adding a physician did not have a significant effect on LOS in the ED.

Conclusions: The dynamic model formulated in this study shows that patient volume determines the effectiveness of investing manpower in the ED. Identifying bottleneck critical factors, as suggested by the theory of constraints, may be useful for planning and coordinating emergency services that operate under stressful and unpredictable conditions. Consideration of patient volume may also provide ED managers with a logical basis for staffing and resource allocation.






[1] ED = emergency department



[2] LOS = length of stay


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