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December 2022
Ze'ev Itsekson Hayosh MD, Eiman Abu Bandora MD, Natalia Shelestovich MD, Maya Nulman MD, Mati Bakon MD, Gal Yaniv MD, Boris Khaitovitch MD, Shmuel Balan MD, Alexandra Gerasimova MD, Tali Drori MD, Stefan Mausbach MD, Yvonne Schwammenthal MD, Arnon Afek MD, Joab Chapman MD, Efrat Shavit Stein MD, David Orion MD

Endovascularly retrieved clots may be a potential resource for diagnosing stroke etiology. This method may influence secondary prevention treatment. We measure thrombin activity eluted by serially washing clots. We concluded that an assay measuring the change in thrombin in clots retrieved during acute stroke endovascular thrombectomy procedures may serve as a diagnostic marker of the origin of the clot. The suggested mechanism for these differences may be the clot location before its retrieval, with high blood flow causing thrombin washout in atherosclerotic clots, in contrast to atrium appendage low blood flow retaining high thrombin levels.

March 2022
Alex Byrne BSc MBBS MRCP, Jonathan Lambert BMBS BMed Sci PhD FRCP FRC Path, Derek Yellon PhD DSc FRCP FESC FACC, Malcolm Walker BSc MBChB MD FRCP, Suganya Sivabalasingham MBBS MRCP FRCR MD, and Arjun K. Ghosh MBBS MSc PhD FHEA FACC FESC FRCP FICOS

Advances in Lymphoma management have resulted in significant improvements in patient outcomes over the last 50 years. Despite these developments, cardiotoxicity from lymphoma treatments remains an important cause of mortality and morbidity in this cohort of patients. We outlined the most common cardiotoxicities associated with lymphoma treatments and their respective investigation and management strategies, including the role of cardiac pre-assessment and late effects monitoring.

December 2019
Shirley Handelzalts PhD, Flavia Steinberg-Henn MSc, Nachum Soroker MD, Michael Schwenk PhD and Itshak Melzer PhD

Background: Falls are a common complication in persons with stroke (PwS). Reliable assessment of balance responses to unexpected loss of balance has the potential to identify risk for falls. 

Objectives: To examine inter-observer reliability of balance responses to unannounced surface perturbations in PwS and to explore the concurrent validity of a balance recovery assessment protocol.

Methods: Two observers evaluated balance recovery strategies and fall threshold (a fall into a harness system) in 15 PwS and 15 healthy adults who were exposed to forward, backward, right, and left unannounced surface translations in six increasing intensities while standing. 

Results: Observer agreement was 100% for the fall threshold. Kappa coefficients for step strategies were 0.960–0.988 in PwS and 0.886–0.938 in healthy adults, 0.905–0.988 for arm reactions in PwS and 0.754–0.926 in healthy adults. Significant correlations were found between fall threshold and Berg Balance Scale (r = 0.691), 6-minute walk test (r = 0.599), and fall efficacy scale-international (r= -0.581). 

Conclusions: A trained examiner can reliably classify reactive balance responses to surface perturbations. The high frequency of falls observed in PwS highlights the importance of assessing reactive balance responses to different directions and intensities of surface translations.

April 2019
Yulia Gamerman MPT, Moshe Hoshen MD, Avner Herman Cohen MD, Zhana Alter PT, Luzit Hadad PT and Itshak Melzer PT PhD

Background: Falls while turning are associated with increased risk of hip fracture in older adults. Reliable and clinically valid methods for turn ability assessments are needed.

Objectives: To explore the inter-observer reliability and known group validity of the TURN 180 test.

Methods: We divided 78 independent older adults (mean age 76.6 ± 6.5 years) into three groups: non-fallers, infrequent fallers (1–2 falls per year), and recurrent fallers (> 2 falls per year). Participants underwent performance-based tests: Timed Up and Go (TUG), Performance Oriented Mobility Assessment (POMA), and Berg Balance Scale (BBS). TUG was videotaped for later analysis of the TURN 180 test by two blinded observers.

Results: A significant difference was found in the TURN 180 test parameters among the groups (P < 0.04). TURN 180 was highly correlated with TUG (r = 0.81–0.89, P < 0.001) and BBS (r = -0.704–0.754, P < 0.0001) and moderately with POMA (r = -0.641–0.698, P < 0.0001). The number of steps was found to be the strongest parameter to determine fallers among older adults (specificity 96.3%, sensitivity 40%). Inter-rater reliability (intraclass correlation coefficient 0.91–0.96, P < 0.0001) was found to be excellent for the number of steps, time taken to accomplish a turn, and total test score categories.

Conclusions: The TURN 180 test is highly reliable and can identify the older adults who fall. Our results show that the TURN 180 test can serve as a good performance-based examination for research or clinical setting.

Itai Gross MD, Ayalon Hadar BSc, Miklosh Bala MD and Saar Hashavya MD

Background: Horse riding has become increasingly popular in recent years and is a common activity among children. As a result, pediatric horse-related injuries are frequently encountered in emergency departments.

Objectives: To examine the characteristics of horse-related injuries in the pediatric population.

Methods: We collected and analyzed the data on all pediatric horse-related injuries presented to a tertiary hospital, level one trauma center, during the years 2006–2016.

Results: A total of 53 children with horse-related injuries were documented. Forty-two patients were male (79%) and their mean age was 11.13 ± 4.72 years. The most common mechanism of injury was falling off a horse (31 patients, 58%) and the most common type of injury was skeletal (32 patients, 60%). Head injuries occurred in 16 patients (30%) and facial injuries in 12 (23%). The mean Injury Severity Score (ISS) was 10.5 ± 6.32, and 15 patients (28%) had severe trauma (ISS > 15). Twenty-nine patients (55%) required trauma team intervention, 12 (23%) were admitted to the intensive care unit, and 24 (45%) required surgery. The mean length of hospitalization was 4.3 ± 3.14 days.

Conclusions: Our study suggests that horse-related trauma may involve serious injuries and it exhibits typical injury patterns. Young boys are at highest risk. The potential severity of these injuries merits a thorough evaluation. We suggest that these injuries be triaged appropriately, preferably to a medical facility with proper trauma capabilities.

May 2016
Yulia Treister-Goltzman MD and Roni Peleg MD

There has been a dramatic increase in the number of female physicians in all fields and specializations of medicine, but this increase has not resulted in a redistribution of domestic tasks and responsibilities. Reviewing the literature of the last two decades (April 1994 to April 2014) on how female physicians cope with the challenge of balancing their family and professional lives for the duration of their professional careers revealed that they suffer from the work-family conflict more than other professionals and that it has a more negative effect on women than on men. Women physicians consider work-family balance significantly when making career choices. These considerations affect their career success, their productivity as faculty members, their marital life, and parenthood. Having a supportive spouse at home and a facilitating mentor at work are important for a positive work-family balance among female physicians. Special career-supporting measures, such as flexible work schedules and expanded support for childcare over the course of work and when taking part in academic activities, are critical for female physicians.

November 2014
Eva Zold MD PhD, Edit Bodolay MD PhD, Balazs Dezső MD PhD, Györgyike Soos MD PhD, Britt Nakken PhD and Peter Szodoray MD PhD
May 2013
M. Abu-Gazala, N. Shussman, S. Abu-Gazala, R. Elazary, M. Bala, S. Rozenberg, A. Klimov, A.I. Rivkind, D. Arbell, G. Almogy and A.I. Bloom
 Background: Renal artery injuries are rarely encountered in victims of blunt trauma. However, the rate of early diagnosis of such injuries is increasing due to increased awareness and the liberal use of contrast-enhanced CT. Sporadic case reports have shown the feasibility of endovascular management of blunt renal artery injury. However, no prospective trials or long-term follow-up studies have been reported.

Objectives: To present our experience with endovascular management of blunt renal artery injury, and review the literature.

Methods: We conducted a retrospective study of 18 months at a level 1 trauma center. Search of our electronic database and trauma registry identified three patients with renal artery injury from blunt trauma who were successfully treated endovascularly. Data recorded included the mechanism of injury, time from injury and admission to revascularization, type of endovascular therapy, clinical and imaging outcome, and complications.

Results: Mean time from injury to endovascular revascularization was 193 minutes and mean time from admission to revascularization 154 minutes. Stent-assisted angioplasty was used in two cases, while angioplasty alone was performed in a 4 year old boy. A good immediate angiographic result was achieved in all patients. At a mean follow-up of 13 months the treated renal artery was patent in all patients on duplex ultrasound. The mean percentage renal perfusion of the treated kidney at last follow-up was 36% on DTPA renal scan. No early or late complications were encountered.

Conclusions: Endovascular management for blunt renal artery dissection is safe and feasible if an early diagnosis is made. This approach may be expected to replace surgical revascularization in most cases.

 

September 2009
M. Bala, A. I. Bloom, L. Appelbaum, P. Levensart, A.I. Rivkind
September 2008
M. Shuvy, J. E. Arbelle, A. Grosbard and A. Katz

Background: Heart rate variability is a sensitive marker of cardiac sympathetic activity.

Objectives: To determine whether long-term hyperthyroidism induced by thyroxine suppressive therapy affects HRV[1].

Methods: Nineteen patients treated with suppressive doses of thyroxin for thyroid cancer and 19 age-matched controls were enrolled. Thyroid function tests and 1 minute HRV were performed on all subjects and the results were compared between the groups. The 1 minute HRV was analyzed during deep breathing and defined as the difference in beats/minute between the shortest and the longest heart rate interval measured by eletrocardiographic recording during six cycles of deep breathing.

Results:  One minute HRV during deep breathing was significantly lower among thyroxine-treated patients compared to healthy controls (25.6 ± 10.5 vs. 34.3 ± 12.6 beats/min, P < 0.05). There were no significant differences in mean, maximal and minimal heart rate between the groups

Conclusions: Thyroxine therapy administered for epithelial thyroid cancer resulted in subclinical hyperthyroidism and significantly decreased HRV due to autonomic dysfunction rather than basic elevated heart rate.






[1] HRV = heart rate variability


December 2007
M. Bala, Y. Edden, Y. Mintz, D. Kisselgoff, I. Gercenstein, A.I. Rivkind, M. Farugy and G. Almogy

Background: Non-operative management of blunt splenic trauma is the preferred option in hemodynamically stable patients.

Objectives: To identify predictors for the successful non-operative management of patients with blunt splenic trauma.

Methods: The study group comprised consecutive patients admitted with the diagnosis of blunt splenic trauma to the Department of Surgery, Hadassah-Hebrew University Medical Center in Jerusalem over a 3 year period. Prospectively recorded were hemodynamic status, computed tomography grade of splenic tear, presence and extent of extra-abdominal injury, number of red blood cell units transfused, and outcome. Hemodynamic instability and the severity of associated injuries were used to determine the need for splenectomy. Hemodynamically stable patients without an indication for laparotomy were admitted to the Intensive Care Unit and monitored.

Results: There were 64 adults (45 males, mean age 30.2 years) who met the inclusion criteria. On univariate analysis the 13 patients (20.3%) who underwent immediate splenectomy were more likely to have lower admission systolic blood pressure (P = 0.001), Glasgow Coma Scale < 8 (P = 0.02), and injury to at least three extra-abdominal regions (P = 0.06). Nine of the 52 patients (17.3%) who were successfully treated non-operatively suffered from grade ≥4 splenic tear. Multivariate analysis identified admission systolic BP[1] (odds ratio 1.04) and associated injury to less than three extra-abdominal regions (OD[2] 8.03) as predictors for the success of non-operative management, while the need for blood transfusion was a strong predictor (OR 66.67) for splenectomy.

Conclusions: Admission systolic blood pressure and limited extra-abdominal injury can be used to identify patients with blunt splenic trauma who do not require splenectomy and can be safely monitored outside an ICU[3] environment. 

 






[1] BP = blood pressure

[2] OD = odds ratio

[3] ICU = Intensive Care Unit


P. Soltesz, K. Veres, E. Szomjak, G. Kerekes, H. Der, Z. Sandor, B. Dezso, K. Devenyi and Z. Szekanecz
September 2006
R. Elazary, M. Bala, G. Almogy, A. Khalaileh, D. Kisselgoff, M. Rav-Acha, A.I. Rivkind and Y Mintz
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