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עמוד בית
Fri, 31.05.24

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January 2018
Jaber Mustafa MD, Ilan Asher MD and Zev Sthoeger MD

Upper extremity deep vein thrombosis (UEDVT) is defined as thrombosis of the deep venous system (subclavian, axillary, brachial, ulnar, and radial veins), which drains the upper extremities. It can be caused by thoracic outlet anatomic obstruction, such as Paget–Schroetter syndrome, (primary) or by central intravenous catheters (secondary). UEDVT may be asymptomatic or present with acute severe pain and arm swelling. Clinical suspicion should be confirmed by diagnostic imaging procedures such as duplex ultrasound, computed tomography scan, or magnetic resonance imaging. UEDVT is managed by anticoagulant treatment. In addition to that, early thrombolysis aimed at preventing post-deep vein thrombosis syndrome and thoracic outlet decompression surgery should be given to patients with primary UEDVT. Anticoagulation without thrombolysis is the treatment of choice for patients with catheter-related thrombosis. Mandatory functioning catheters can remain in place with anticoagulant treatment. All other catheters should be immediately removed. The management of patients with UEDVT requires an experience multidisciplinary team comprised of internists, radiologists, hematologists, and vascular surgeons. Understanding the risk factors for the development of UEDVT, the diagnostic procedures, and the treatment modalities will improve the outcome of those patients.

January 2017
Zev Sthoeger MD, Margalit Lorber MD, Yuval Tal MD, Elias Toubi MD, Howard Amital MD, Shaye Kivity MD, Pnina Langevitz MD, Ilan Asher MD, Daniel Elbirt MD and Nancy Agmon Levin MD

Background: Anti-BLyS treatment with the human belimumab monoclonal antibody was shown to be a safe and effective therapeutic modality in lupus patients with active disease (i.e., without significant neurological/renal involvement) despite standard treatment.

Objectives: To evaluate the “real-life” safety and efficacy of belimumab added to standard therapy in patents with active lupus in five Israeli medical centers.

Methods: We conducted a retrospective open-labeled study of 36 lupus patients who received belimumab monthly for at least 1 year in addition to standard treatment. Laboratory tests (C3/C4, anti dsDNA autoantibodies, chemistry, urinalysis and complete blood count) were done every 3–4 months. Adverse events were obtained from patients’ medical records. Efficacy assessment by the treating physicians was defined as excellent, good/partial, or no response.

Results: The study group comprised 36 lupus patients (8 males, 28 females) with a mean age of 41.6 } 12.2 years. Belimumab was given for a mean period of 2.3 } 1.7 years (range 1–7). None of the patients discontinued belimumab due to adverse events. Four patients (11.1%) had an infection related to belimumab. Only 5 patients (13.9%) stopped taking belimumab due to lack of efficacy. The response was excellent in 25 patients (69.5%) and good/partial in the other 6 (16.6%). Concomitantly, serological response (reduction of C3/C4 and anti-dsDNA autoantibodies) was also observed. Moreover, following belimumab treatment, there was a significant reduction in the usage of corticosteroids (from 100% to 27.7%) and immunosuppressive agents (from 83.3% to 8.3%).

Conclusions: Belimumab, in addition to standard therapy, is a safe and effective treatment for active lupus patients.

October 2016
Ilan Asher MD, Keren Mahlab-Guri MD, Daniel Elbirt MD, Shira Bezalel-Rosenberg MD and Zev Sthoeger MD
May 2016
Daniel Elbirt MD, Keren Mahlab-Guri MD, Shira Bezalel-Rosenberg MD, Ilan Asher MD and Zev Sthoeger MD
August 2014
Daniel Elbirt MD*, Ilan Asher MD*, Keren Mahlab-Guri MD, Shira Bezalel-Rosenberg MD, Victor Edelstein MD and Zev Sthoeger MD

Background: Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is an autoimmune disease characterized by disturbance of the innate and adaptive immune systems with the production of autoantibodies by stimulated B lymphocytes. The BLyS protein (B lymphocyte stimulator) is secreted mainly by monocytes and activated T cells and is responsible for the proliferation, maturation and survival of B cells.

Objectivs: To study sera BLyS level and its clinical significance in Israeli lupus patients over time.

Methods: The study population included 41 lupus patients (8 males, 33 females; mean age 35.56 ± 15.35 years) and 50 healthy controls. The patients were followed for 5.02 ± 1.95 years. We tested 221 lupus sera (mean 5.4 samples/patient) and 50 normal sera for BLyS levels by a capture ELISA. Disease activity was determined by the SLEDAI score.

Results: Sera BLyS levels were significantly higher in SLE patients than in controls (3.37 ± 3.73 vs. 0.32 ± 0.96 ng/ml, P < 0.05). BLyS levels were high in at least one sera sample in 80.5% of the patients but were normal in all sera in the control group. There was no correlation between sera BLyS and anti-ds-DNA autoantibody levels. BLyS levels fluctuated over time in sera of lupus patients with no significant correlation to disease activity.

Conclusions: Most of our lupus patients had high sera BLyS levels, suggesting a role for BLyS in the pathogenesis and course of SLE. Our results support the current novel approach of targeting BLyS (neutralization by antibodies or soluble receptors) in the treatment of active lupus patients.

October 2012
Z. Sthoeger, I. Asher, S. Rosenberg-Bezalel and K. Mahlab-Guri
June 2012
I. Asher, I. Rabinovith, M. Katz and Z. Sthoeger
February 2009
S. Kivity, D. Elbirt, K. Sade, D. Sthoeger, Z. Sthoeger and the Israeli Allergy Rhinitis/Asthma Study Group

Background: Mite allergy is an indoor allergen responsible for most respiratory allergies in the western world. Environmental control can modify disease activity in these patients.

Objectives: To examine the benefit of the Plasma Cluster® device (Sharp, Japan) for inactivating and removing mites from the environment of patients diagnosed with either mite‑sensitive perennial allergic rhinitis or mite‑sensitive allergic asthma.

Methods: Patients with AR[1] (n=30) or AA[2] (n=10) were enrolled into a prospective open observational 8 week study. The first 2 weeks involved initial evaluation, the following 4 weeks consisted of active usage of the device, and the last 2 weeks were designated for follow‑up. Symptom scores (recorded daily by patients and during visits by physicians) were recorded and analyzed.

Results: Patients with AR experienced a significant (P < 0.05) reduction in nasal discharge, post‑nasal drip, nasal congestion, nasal itching, watery eyes, itchy eyes, headache, itchy ears, night disturbances and an improvement in general well‑being during the last 2 days of the study compared to baseline. Patients with AA reported significant (P < 0.05) reduction in dyspnea, wheezing and the need to avoid dust mites. There was a significant (P < 0.05) improvement in mean peak expiratory flow rate at study closure compared to baseline.

Conclusions: Short-term usage of the Plasma Cluster® device resulted in considerable clinical improvement and increased peak expiratory flow rate in patients with AR or AA. The findings of this pilot study warrant longer and controlled studies to determine the value of this device in the treatment of various allergic disorders.






[1] AR = allergic rhinitis



[2] AA = allergic asthma



 
January 2007
D. Ergas, S. Toledo, D. Sthoeger,Z.M. Sthoeger
June 2006
K. Mahlab, M. Katz, S. Shimoni, M. Zborovsky and Z.M. Sthoeger
May 2006
D. Ergas, A. Keysari, V. Edelstein and M.Z. Sthoeger

Background: Q fever is endemic in Israel, yet a large series describing the clinical spectrum of inpatients with acute Q fever in Israel is lacking. 

Objectives: To report on the clinical characteristics and outcome of hospitalized patients with acute Q fever in Israel. 

Methods: We conducted a retrospective study of 100 patients hospitalized in six medical centers, in whom acute Q fever was diagnosed by the presence of immunoglobulin G and M antibodies to phase II Coxiella burnetti antigens. 

Results: The mean age of the patients was 42.7 ± 17.3 years with a male to female ratio of 1.6:1. Acute Q fever occurred throughout the year but was more common during the warm season. The most common clinical presentation was acute febrile disease (98%, mean length of fever 15.5 ± 8.6 days), followed by hepatitis (67%) and pneumonia (32%). The prominent laboratory findings included: accelerated erythrocyte sedimentation rate, normal or low white blood count with many band forms, thrombocytopenia, and abnormal urinalysis. Although the diagnosis of acute Q fever was not known during the hospitalization in the majority of patients, about 80% of our patients received appropriate antibiotic therapy and all patients recovered. 

Conclusions: Patients with acute Q fever present with a typical clinical picture that enables clinical diagnosis and empiric therapy in most cases. The prognosis of hospitalized patients with acute Q fever is excellent.

April 2005
E. Magen, D. Elbirt and Z. Sthoeger
Highly active antiretroviral therapy has dramatically improved the quality of life and life expectancy of patients with human immunodeficiency virus. However, the prolonged use of HAART[1] leads to severe metabolic adverse events. Both HIV[2]infection and HAART can cause changes in lipid and glucose metabolism as well as elevation of blood pressure, promoting the development of atherosclerosis. Cardiovascular diseases have become a major cause of mortality among HIV-infected subjects who respond well to antiretroviral therapy. Nevertheless, a proper lifestyle and pharmacologic intervention can improve cardiovascular risk factors in the HIV-treated population and significantly reduce healthcare investments in the treatment of future cardiovascular complications in this population. In this review we summarize the current knowledge of CVD[3] prevention and treatment in HIV patients.

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[1] HAART = highly active antiretroviral therapy

[2] HIV = human immunodeficiency virus

[3] CVD = cardiovascular disease
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