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עמוד בית
Fri, 01.03.24

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May 2023
Yaniv Zager MD, Yuri Goldes MD, Dan Assaf MD, Nadav Zilka MD, Roi Anteby MD, Yehonatan Nevo MD, Liran Barda MD, Avinoam Nevler MD

Background: The neutrophil to lymphocyte ratio (NLR) has demonstrated prognostic value in various malignant conditions, including gastric adenocarcinoma. However, chemotherapy may affect NLR.

Objectives: To evaluate the prognostic value of NLR as an accessory decision-making tool in terms of operating patients after neoadjuvant chemotherapy in patients with resectable gastric cancer.

Methods: We collected oncologic, perioperative, and survival data of patients with gastric adenocarcinoma who underwent curative intent gastrectomy and D2 lymphadenectomy between 2009 and 2016. The NLR was calculated from preoperative laboratory tests and classified as high (> 4) and low (≤ 4). The t-test, chi-square, Kaplan-Meier analysis, and Cox multivariate regression models were used to assess associations of clinical, histologic, and hematological variables with survival.

Results: For 124 patients the median follow-up was 23 months (range 1–88). High NLR was associated with greater rate of local complication (r=0.268, P < 0.01). The rate of major complications (Clavien-Dindo ≥ 3) was higher in the high NLR group (28% vs. 9%, P = 0.022). Among the 53 patients who received neoadjuvant chemotherapy, those with low NLR had significantly improved disease-free survival (DFS) (49.7 vs. 27.7 months, P = 0.025). Low NLR was not significantly associated with overall survival (mean survival, 51.2 vs. 42.3 months, P = 0.19). Multivariate regression identified NLR group (P = 0.013), male gender (P = 0.04), and body mass index (P = 0.026) as independently associated with DFS.

Conclusions: Among gastric cancer patients planned for curative intent surgery who underwent neoadjuvant chemotherapy, NLR may have prognostic value, particularly regarding DFS and postoperative complications.

May 2018
Yehonatan Nevo MD, Yuri Goldes MD, Liran Barda MD, Roy Nadler MD, Mordechai Gutman MD and Avinoam Nevler MD

Background: Recent studies have analyzed risk factors associated with complications after gastric cancer surgery using the Clavien-Dindo classification (CD). However, they have been based on Asian population cohorts (Chinese, Japanese, Korean).

Objectives: To prospectively analyze all post-gastrectomy complications according to severity using CD classification and identify postoperative risk factors and complications.

Methods: We analyzed all gastrectomies for gastric cancer performed 2009–2014. Recorded parameters included demographic data, existing co-morbidities, neo-adjuvant treatment, intra-operative findings, postoperative course, and histologic findings. Postoperative complications were graded using CD classification.

Results: The study comprised 112 patients who underwent gastrectomy. Mean age was 64.8 ± 12.8 years; 53 patients (47%) underwent gastrectomy, 37 (34%) total gastrectomy, and 22 (19%) total extended gastrectomy. All patients had D2 lymphadenectomy. The average number of retrieved lymph nodes was 35 ± 17. Severe complication rate (≥ IIIa) was 14% and mortality rate was 1.8%. In a univariate analysis, age > 65 years; ASA 3 or higher; chronic renal failure; multi-organ resection; and tumor, node, and metastases (TNM) stage ≥ IIIc were found to be significantly associated with CD complication grade > III (P = 0.01, P = 0.05, P = 0.04, P = 0.04, and P = 0.01, respectively). Multivariate regression analysis revealed advanced stage (≥ IIIc) and age > 65 years to be significant independent risk factors (P < 0.05).

Conclusions: Age > 65 and advanced stage (≥ IIIc) were the primary risk factors for complications of grade > III according to the CD classification following gastrectomy for gastric cancer.

March 2018
Avinoam Nevler MD, Yaniv Berger MD, Avital Rabinovitz MD, Oded Zmora MD, Moshe Shabtai MD, Danny Rosin MD and Mordechai Gutman MD FACS

Background: Acute appendicitis (AA) is one of the most common indications for emergency abdominal surgery.

Objective: To assess the diagnostic and prognostic value of serum bilirubin and liver enzyme levels in the management of acute appendicitis.

Methods: Consecutive emergency department patients referred for a surgical consult for suspected AA were prospectively enrolled in the study. Data regarding demographic, clinical and laboratory results were recorded. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve was performed for all evaluated parameters. Clinical and laboratory markers were evaluated for diagnostic accuracy and correlation to the clinical severity, histology reports, and length of hospital stay.

Results: The study was comprised of 100 consecutive patients. ROC curve analysis revealed white blood cell count, absolute neutrophils count (ANC), C-reactive protein, total-bilirubin and direct-bilirubin levels as significant factors for diagnosis of AA. The combination of serum bilirubin levels, alanine transaminase levels, and ANC yielded the highest area under the curve (0.898, 95% confidence interval 0.835–0.962, P<0.001) with a diagnostic accuracy of 86%. In addition, total and direct bilirubin levels significantly correlated with the severity of appendicitis as described in the operative and pathology reports (P < 0.01). Total and direct bilirubin also significantly correlated with the length of hospital stay (P < 0.01).

Conclusions: Serum bilirubin levels, alone or combined with other markers, may be considered as a clinical marker for AA correlating with disease existence, severity, and length of hospital stay. These findings support the routine use of serum bilirubin levels in the workup of patients with suspected AA.

April 2017
Avinoam Nevler MD, Gil Har-Zahav MD, Avigdor Abraham MD, Ginette Schiby MD, Oded Zmora MD, Moshe Shabtai MD, Mordechai Gutman MD and Danny Rosin MD

Background: Diagnosis of abdominal lymphadenopathy is challenging when not accompanied by peripheral lymphadenopathy. Computed tomography-guided core-needle biopsy has largely replaced open procedures in recent years, but this approach is limited by access to the anatomic region and the amount of tissue acquired.

Objective: To demonstrate the feasibility of the laparoscopic approach in obtaining abdominal lymph node biopsies and to evaluate the diagnostic adequacy of the technique.

Methods: We reviewed the data of patients who underwent laparoscopic lymph node biopsy between 2014 and 2014 in our department. Demographics, intra-operative parameters and postoperative course were examined, as were histological reports. Postoperative complications were categorized according to the Clavien-Dindo(CD) classification.

Results: Between 2004 and 2014, 57 laparoscopic biopsies were performed for intra-abdominal lymphadenopathy. One case was a repeated attempt due to limited histologic material. The mean age was 49.5 ± 19.6 years. There were two conversions to open laparotomy, one due to small bowel injury and the other due to a sizable mass. Overall, 56 cases had full clinical data: 48 cases (85.7%) had CD=0, six (10.7%) had CD=1, one postoperative severe complication (CD=3) and one mortality (CD=5), which was related to preexisting hepatic insufficiency. Mean hospital stay was 1.6 days. Overall, adequate tissue samples were acquired in 96.7% and only 3 of these cases resulted in inconclusive diagnoses.

Conclusions: Laparoscopic lymph node biopsy is a viable alternative to the currently available methods of tissue retrieval. It provides an access for nodes which are inaccessible percutaneously, and may allow a superior diagnostic yield.

January 2016
Avinoam Nevler MD, Esther Shabtai MD, Danny Rosin MD, Aviad Hoffman MD, Mordechai Gutman MD and Moshe Shabtai MD

Background: High density breast mammography has been associated with a greater risk for breast cancer and an increased likelihood of false negative results. 

Objectives: To assess whether the degree of mammographic breast density correlates with an increased risk for the presence of radiographic findings requiring further histological investigation. 

Methods: Included in the study were 2760 consecutive screening mammograms performed in a large volume, early detection mammography unit. All mammograms were complemented by high resolution ultrasound and interpreted by a single expert radiologist. Breast density (BD) was evaluated using a semi-quantitative 5 grade scale and grouped into low breast density (LBD) and high breast density (HBD) mammograms. Demographic and all relevant obstetric, personal and family history of breast cancer data were recorded. 

Results: Of the 2760 mammograms 2096 (76%) were LBD and 664 (24%) were HBD. Mean age of the LBD and HBD groups was 59 ± 10.5 and 50.9 ± 9.3 years respectively (P = 0.001). Breast density significantly correlated with presence of mammographic findings requiring further histological assessment (8.7% and 12.3% for LBD and HBD respectively, P < 0.01). In women younger than 60 years in whom histological assessment was required due to these findings, malignant pathology was significantly more prevalent in the HBD group (2.3% and 4.1% respectively, P = 0.03). Age, parity, patient history and HBD were identified as independent risk factors for any pathological mammographic finding. 

Conclusions: Highly dense mammography, aside from being an indicator of higher risk for breast cancer, appears to be associated with a significantly higher incidence of findings that will prompt further investigation to achieve a definite diagnosis. 

 

October 2015
January 2015
Yehiel Ziv MD, Avinoam Nevler MD, Ehud Willenz DVM, Ofer Doron, Andrew Zbar MD, Aino Shperber MD and Judith Sandbank MD

Background: New animal models provide insights into the pathogenesis of different types of inflammatory bowel disease as well as novel pathways for new therapeutic options. However, the scarcity of large animal models hinders the research and development of new surgical procedures and technological devices in inflammatory bowel disease surgery. Common small animal inducible models involve chemical agents that result in the development of acute intestinal inflammation.

Objectives: To assess a novel method for the induction of Crohn’s-like colitis using intramural injection of sclerosants in a porcine model.

Methods: Seven domestic pigs underwent several experimental protocols to assess the efficacy of intramural colonic injections of two different compounds (lauromacrogol, and phenol in almond oil). Twenty-five different large bowel segments were treated with intramural injections of the compounds. The animals were followed for 6 weeks, and treated colonic segments were resected for histopathological examination.

Results: Intramural injection of lauromacrogol resulted in non-specific, mild reactive foreign body changes only. Injection of various dosages of 5% phenol in almond oil caused a range of histopathological changes varying from focal fibrosis to Crohn’s-like reactions comprising acute and chronic infiltrates, mucosal ulceration and focal necrosis with enteric and lymphoid non-caseating granulomas.

Conclusions: Intramural colonic phenol in almond oil injection in pigs induces inflammatory reactions that histologically resemble Crohn's disease in humans. 

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