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עמוד בית
Sat, 20.07.24

Original Articles

IMAJ | volume 12

Journal 5, May 2010
pages: 262-265

A Costly Covenant: Ritual Circumcision and Urinary Tract Infection

    Summary

    Background:

    Ritual circumcision in neonates may cause a urinary tract infection within 2 weeks of the procedure.

    Objectives:

    To evaluate the prevalence of urinary tract infection among Jewish male circumcised neonates (¡Ü 28 days old) evaluated for fever in the emergency room.

    Methods:

    All available medical records of neonates presenting to the pediatric emergency room for evaluation of fever over a 10 year period were reviewed. Data included gender, ethnic background, age in days on presentation to the emergency room, age in days when circumcision was performed (in males ¡Ý 8 days of age), and results of urine, blood

    and cerebrospinal fluid cultures. Families of males older than 8 days of age who had a UTI[1] were contacted by telephone to verify the circumcision status when the infant presented to the ER[2], to ascertain whether the circumcision was performed ritually by a mohel*
    or by a physician, and, when not recorded in the chart, to verify the day of life on which circumcision was performed.

    Results:

    Among neonates older than 8 days of age, 60 (24.7%) of the 243 febrile Jewish males had a UTI, as compared to 12 (8.4%) of 143 females (P < 0.0001). In 39 of 54 male neonates (72%) for whom circumcision was performed ritually on the eighth day of life, UTI occurred within 9 days of the circumcision. For females, there was no such clustering of UTI cases in the second week of life, nor during any other time period.

    Conclusions

    : Febrile male neonates who have undergone ritual circumcision have a high prevalence of UTI and must be evaluated and treated accordingly.
     

    [1] UTI = urinary tract infection
    [2] ER = emergency room
    * Mohel is a Jewish man trained in the practice of Brit milah (circumcision).

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