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עמוד בית
Tue, 16.04.24

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January 2018
Jaber Mustafa MD, Ilan Asher MD and Zev Sthoeger MD

Upper extremity deep vein thrombosis (UEDVT) is defined as thrombosis of the deep venous system (subclavian, axillary, brachial, ulnar, and radial veins), which drains the upper extremities. It can be caused by thoracic outlet anatomic obstruction, such as Paget–Schroetter syndrome, (primary) or by central intravenous catheters (secondary). UEDVT may be asymptomatic or present with acute severe pain and arm swelling. Clinical suspicion should be confirmed by diagnostic imaging procedures such as duplex ultrasound, computed tomography scan, or magnetic resonance imaging. UEDVT is managed by anticoagulant treatment. In addition to that, early thrombolysis aimed at preventing post-deep vein thrombosis syndrome and thoracic outlet decompression surgery should be given to patients with primary UEDVT. Anticoagulation without thrombolysis is the treatment of choice for patients with catheter-related thrombosis. Mandatory functioning catheters can remain in place with anticoagulant treatment. All other catheters should be immediately removed. The management of patients with UEDVT requires an experience multidisciplinary team comprised of internists, radiologists, hematologists, and vascular surgeons. Understanding the risk factors for the development of UEDVT, the diagnostic procedures, and the treatment modalities will improve the outcome of those patients.

June 2017
Yaniv Levi MD, Aaron Frimerman MD, Avraham Shotan MD, Michael Shochat MD PhD, David S Blondheim MD, Amit Segev MD, Ilan Goldenerg MD, Mark Kazatsker MD, Liubov Vasilenko MD, Nir Shlomo PhD and Simcha R Meisel MD MSc

Background: Trials have shown superiority of primary percutaneous intervention (PPCI) over in-hospital thrombolysis in ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) patients treated within 6-12 hours from symptom onset. These studies also included high-risk patients not all of whom underwent a therapeutic intervention. 

Objectives: To compare the outcome of early-arriving stable STEMI patients treated by thrombolysis with or without coronary angiography to the outcome of PPCI-treated STEMI patients.

Methods: Based on six biannual Acute Coronary Syndrome Israeli Surveys comprising 5474 STEMI patients, we analyzed the outcome of 1464 hemodynamically stable STEMI patients treated within 3 hours of onset. Of these, 899 patients underwent PPCI, 383 received in-hospital thrombolysis followed by angiography (TFA), and 182 were treated by thrombolysis only.

Results: Median time intervals from symptom onset to admission were similar while door-to-reperfusion intervals were 63, 45 and 52.5 minutes for PPCI, TFA and thrombolysis only, respectively (P < 0.001). The 30-day composite endpoint of death, post-infarction angina and myocardial infarction occurred in 77 patients of the PPCI group (8.6%), 64 patients treated by TFA (16.7%), and 36 patients of the thrombolysis only group (19.8%, P < 0.001), with differences mostly due to post-infarction angina. One-year mortality rate was 27 (3%), 13 (3.4%) and 11 (6.1%) for PPCI, TFA and thrombolysis only, respectively (P = 0.12).

Conclusions: PPCI was superior to thrombolysis in early-arriving stable STEMI patients with regard to 30-day composite endpoint driven by a decreased incidence of post-infarction angina. No 1 year survival benefit for PPCI over thrombolysis was observed in early-arriving stable STEMI patients.

 

May 2017
Michael Findler MD, Jeremy Molad MD, Natan M Bornstein MD and Eitan Auriel MD MSc

Background: Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common arrhythmia and a common cause of ischemic stroke. Stroke patients with AF have been shown to have a poorer neurological outcome than stroke patients without AF.

Objectives: To determine the impact of pre-existing AF on residual degree of disability in patients treated with IV thrombolysis.

Methods: In this case-control study, data of 214 stroke patients (63 with AF and 151 without AF) were collected from the National Acute Stroke Israeli Registry, a nationwide quadrennial stroke database. Stroke severity and outcome were compared using the National Institute of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) on admission and the modified Rankin Scale (mRS) on admission and discharge. Demographics and stroke characteristics were also compared between the groups.

Results: Stroke severity, as determined by NIHSS at admission, was higher in the AF group than the non-AF. In the group of patients who were treated with intravenous tissue plasminogen activator (tPA), more patients had favorable outcomes (mRS = 0–1 on discharge) in the non-AF group than in the AF group (P = 0.058, odds ratio = 2.217, confidence interval 0.973 to 5.05).

Conclusions: Our study suggests worse outcome in thrombolized patients with AF compared to non-AF stroke patients. Therefore, AF itself can be a poor prognostic factor for tPA sensitivity regarding the chance of revascularization and recovery after intravenous tPA.

January 2017
Moshe Rav Acha MD PhD, Aharon Medina MD, David Rosenmann MD, Naama Bogot MD, Marc W. Klutstein MD, Adi Butnaru MD and Giora Weisz MD
December 2009
A.Y. Gur, L. Shopin and N.M. Bornstein

Background: Intravenous tissue plasminogen activator has been approved treatment for acute (≤ 3 hours) ischemic stroke in Israel since late 2004. The Israeli experience with IV tPA[1] is still limited. Several factors may influence the response to IV thrombolysis, including time-to-treatment parameters and tandem internal carotid artery/middle cerebral artery stenosis/occlusion.

Objectives: To compare our experience with IV tPA treatment of patients with acute ischemic stroke to the findings of the SITS-MOST (Safe Implementation of Thrombolysis in Stroke-MOnitoring STudy, international data) and of the Sheba Medical Center (national data) and to compare the early outcome among patients with ischemic stroke in the MCA[2] with and without severe ICA[3] stenosis.

Methods: We obtained demographic data, timing details, stroke severity, hemorrhagic complications, mortality, and early outcome from the records of IV tPA-treated acute ischemic stroke patients.

Results: Fifty-eight patients (median age 69 years, 26 females) with acute ischemic stroke were treated by IV tPA at the Tel Aviv Sourasky Medical Center in 2006–2007. Median time between stroke onset and IV tPA administration was 148 minutes for the Sourasky center, 150 minutes for the Sheba center, and 140 minutes for SITS-MOST. The Sourasky mortality rate was 10.5%. Of the 31 patients who suffered MCA stroke, 8 had severe ipsilateral ICA stenosis. These 8 had significantly lower neurological improvement than the 23 without ipsilateral ICA stenosis (1/8 versus 15/23, P <0.001).

Conclusions: Our data demonstrate fairly similar parameters of IV tPA treatment compared to other centers and suggest that patients with severe ICA stenosis might be less likely to benefit from IV tPA.


 




[1] tPA = tissue plasminogen activator



[2] MCA = middle cerebral artery



[3] ICA = internal carotid artery


November 2006
Y. Schwammenthal, R. Tsabari, M. Bakon, D. Orion, O. Merzeliak and D. Tanne
 Background: Rapid restoration of cerebral blood flow is the principle goal of acute ischemic stroke therapy. Intravenous recombinant tissue plasminogen activator is an effective therapy for acute ischemic stroke, has been available in the United States for over a decade and was approved for use in Israel at the end of 2004.

Objectives: To assess the implementation of intravenous rt-PA[1] in routine clinical care at our center after its formal approval in Israel, and the therapeutic and logistic implications for reperfusion therapy for acute ischemic stroke in Israel.

Methods: Patients with acute ischemic stroke, admitted between January 2005 and June 2006, who were treated with intravenous rt-PA or endovascular-based reperfusion were reviewed. Implementation, timing, safety and clinical outcomes were assessed.

Results: Forty-six patients received reperfusion therapy (37 with intravenous rt-PA and 9 with endovascular-based therapy), corresponding to 4.0% of ischemic stroke patients in 2005 and a projection of 6.2% in 2006. Mean age of intravenously treated patients was 67 years (range 22–85 years), median baseline NIHSS score was 14 (range 10–18, 25–75%) and the median ‘onset to drug time’ was 150 minutes (range 120–178, 25–75%). Symptomatic intracerebral hemorrhage and orolingual angioedema each occurred in one patient (2.7%). Significant clinical improvement occurred in 54% of treated patients and 38% of patients were independent at hospital discharge.

Conclusions: Use of reperfusion therapy for acute ischemic stroke has increased in our center after the formal approval of rt-PA therapy to over 5%, with ‘onset to drug time’, safety and outcome after intravenous rt-PA treatment comparing favorably with worldwide experience. A prerequisite for the implementation of effective reperfusion therapy and expansion of the proportion of patients treated nationwide is the establishment of a comprehensive infrastructure.


 





[1] rt-PA = recombinant tissue plasminogen activator


R.R. Leker, R. Eichel, G. Rafaeli and T. Ben-Hur
 Acute ischemic stroke is one of the leading causes of mortality and chronic disability in the western world. Yet, despite the enormous socioeconomic burden that it imposes, therapies to combat AIS are not widely available. Moreover, revascularization of the ischemic tissue with tissue plasminogen activator, the only FDA-approved therapy for AIS[1], is hampered by a very narrow therapeutic time window and is only used in a minority of patients. Cerebral ischemia leads to brain damage caused by several pathologic mechanisms that can potentially be blocked by neuroprotective drugs that aim to salvage the ischemic penumbra. However, despite numerous clinical trials no single drug candidate has proved efficacious in AIS. The current situation clearly calls for novel therapeutic strategies to be used in acute ischemic stroke. This review surveys some of these novel and promising cutting edge therapies.







[1] AIS = acute ischemic stroke


February 2004
Y. Schwammenthal, M.J. Drescher, O. Merzeliak, R. Tsabari, B. Bruk, M. Feibel, C. Hoffman, M. Bakon, Z. Rotstein, J. Chapman and D. Tanne

Background: Intravenous recombinant tissue plasminogen activator therapy within 3 hours of stroke onset is a proven effective treatment for acute ischemic stroke.

Objectives: To assess the feasibility and safety of rt-PA[1] therapy for reperfusion in routine clinical practice in Israel, in a setting of a dedicated stroke unit.

Methods: Consecutive patients presenting within less than 3 hours of stroke onset were evaluated by an emergency physician and the neurology stroke team. After brain computerized tomography eligible patients were treated with intravenous rt-PA (0.9 mg/kg; maximum dose 90 mg) according to an in-hospital protocol corresponding to recommended criteria. Patients were admitted to the acute stroke unit. Safety and clinical outcome were routinely assessed. Re-canalization was assessed by serial transcranial Doppler.

Results: The study group comprised 16 patients, mean age 61 years (range 47–80 years), male to female ratio 10:6, whose median baseline National Institutes of Health stroke scale was 13 (range 6–24). They were treated within a mean door-to-CT time of 39 minutes (range 17–62 min), door-to-drug time 101 minutes (range 72–150), and stroke onset-to-drug time 151 minutes (range 90–180). There was an early improvement within 24 hours (of ≥ 4 points in the NIHSS[2] score) in 7 patients (44%) and no early deteriorations. There were no protocol deviations, no symptomatic intracranial hemorrhages, and no major systemic hemorrhage within 36 hours of rt-PA treatment. Three asymptomatic hemorrhagic transformations of the infarct were noted on routine follow-up brain CT associated with neurologic improvement. Outcome data were comparable to the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke rt-PA Stroke Study.

Conclusion: Intravenous rt-PA treatment within 3 hours of stroke onset in routine clinical practice in Israel is feasible and appears safe in the setting of a neurology stroke unit and team. Careful implementation of rt-PA therapy for selected patients in Israel is encouraged.






[1] rt-PA = recombinant tissue plasminogen activator



[2] NIHSS = National Institutes of Health stroke scale


December 2003
A. Wolak, H. Gilutz, G. Amit, C. Cafri, R. Ilia and D. Zahger

Background: Reperfusion practices have changed markedly over the last few years with the introduction of primary percutaneous coronary intervention. This technique has gained growing popularity in Israel, but little published data are available regarding the delays to primary PCI[1] in real life in this country.

Objectives: To examine temporal trends in time to reperfusion achieved in a large tertiary center over 6 years.

Results: Between 1997 and 2002, 1,031 patients were admitted to our hospital with ST elevation myocardial infarction. Of these, 62% underwent thrombolysis and 38% primary PCI. The proportion of patients referred for primary PCI increased steadily, from 14% in 1997 to 68% in 2002. Door to treatment time among patients referred for thrombolysis or primary PCI was 54 ± 42 and 117 ± 77 minutes, respectively (P < 0.00001). The door to needle time in patients given thrombolysis remained virtually unchanged during the study period at around 54 minutes. In contrast, the door to balloon time has progressively and substantially decreased, from 175 ± 164 minutes in 1997 to 96 ± 52 minutes in 2002.

Conclusions: There is a steady increase in the proportion of patients referred for primary PCI than for thrombolysis. The door to needle delay in patients given thrombolysis substantially exceeds the recommended time. The door to balloon time has declined considerably but still slightly exceeds the recommended time. Given the inherent delay between initiation of lysis and arterial recanalization, it appears from our experience that PCI does not substantially delay arterial reperfusion as compared to thrombolysis. Efforts should continue to minimize delays to reperfusion therapy.






[1] PCI = percutaneous coronary intervention


March 2002
Alp Aydinalp, MD, Alice Wishniak, MD, Lily van den Akker-Berman, MD, Tsafrir Or and Nathan Roguin, MD

Background: Myocardial infarction-associated pericarditis is a common cause of chest pain following MI[1], its frequency depending on how it is defined.

Objectives: To investigate the incidence of acute pericarditis and pericardial effusion in the acute phase of ST-elevation MI treated with thrombolytic therapy.

Methods: The study group comprised 159 consecutive patients fulfilling the criteria for acute MI who were admitted to our department during 18 months. Infarct-associated pericarditis was defined as the finding of a pericardial friction rub, a typical pleuropericardial pain, or both. All patients underwent physical examination of the cardiovascular system four times daily for 7 days, as well as daily electrocardiogram and echo Doppler examinations.

Results: Fourteen patients (8.8%) developed a friction rub and 11 patients (6.9%) had a mild pericardial effusion. Six patients (4.0%) had both a friction rub and pericardial effusion. Two patients had a friction rub for more than 7 days. Pleuropericardial chest pain was present in 31 patients (19.5%) but only 7 of them had a friction rub.  The in-hospital mortality rate was 1.3% and no mortality was observed in the acute pericarditis group.

Conclusion: The incidence of signs associated with acute pericarditis was lower in MI patients treated with thrombolysis, compared with historical controls, when a friction rub and/or pericardial effusion was present. There was no significant reduction in the incidence of pleuropericardial chest pain.






[1] MI = myocardial infarction


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