• IMA sites
  • IMAJ services
  • IMA journals
  • Follow us
  • Alternate Text Alternate Text
עמוד בית
Sun, 16.06.24

Search results


April 2015
Dorit E. Zilberman MD, Uri Rimon MD, Roy Morag MD, Harry Z. Winkler MD, Jacob Ramon MD and Yoram Mor MD

Abstract

Background: Iatrogenic ureteral injury may be seen following abdominopelvic surgeries. While ureteral injuries identified during surgery should be immediately and surgically repaired, those that are postoperatively diagnosed may be treated non-surgically by draining the ipsilateral kidney. Data regarding the outcome of this approach are still missing.

Objectives: To evaluate the success rates of non-surgical management of ureteral injuries diagnosed following abdominopelvic surgeries.

Methods: We retrospectively reviewed the files of all patients treated for iatrogenic ureteral injuries diagnosed following abdominopelvic surgeries. Patients' ipsilateral kidney was percutaneously drained following diagnosis of injury by either nephrostomy tube (NT)/nephro-ureteral stent (NUS) or double-J stent (DJS) inserted retrogradely. The tube was left in place until a pyelogram confirmed healing or a conservative approach was abandoned due to failure.

Results: Twenty-nine patients were identified as having ureteral injury following abdominopelvic surgery. Median time from injury to renal drainage was 9 days, interquartile range (IQR) 4–17 days. Seven cases (24%) had surgical repair. Among the other 22 patients, in 2 oncology patients the conservative approach was maintained although renal drainage failed to resolve the injury. In the remaining 20, median drainage length was 60 days (IQR 43.5–85). Calculated overall success rates following renal drainage was 69% (18/29), and with NS approached 78.5%.

Conclusions: Ureteral injuries diagnosed following abdominopelvic surgeries can be treated conservatively. Ipsilateral renal drainage should be the first line of treatment before surgical repair, and NUS may be the preferred drainage to obtain spontaneous ureteral healing. 

Nir Gal-or MD, Tamir Gil MD, Issa Metanes MD, Munir Nashshibi MD, Leonid Bryzgalin MD, Aharon Amir MD and Yaron Har-Shai MD
March 2015
Michael Shpoliansky BSc, Dan Spiegelstein MD, Amihai Shinfeld MD and Ehud Raanani MD
December 2014
Sharon Gannot MD, Paul Fefer MD, Eran Kopel MD, Ksenia Kuchkina MD, Roy Beigel MD, Ehud Raanani MD, Ilan Goldenberg MD, Victor Guetta MD and Amit Segev MD

Background: The Syntax score (SS) is a helpful tool for determining the optimal revascularization strategy regarding coronary artery bypass surgery (CABG) vs. percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) in patients with complex coronary disease. While an association between higher SS and mortality was found for PCI patients, no such association was found for CABG patients.

Objectives: To assess whether the SS predicts late mortality in patients undergoing CABG in a real-world setting.

Methods: The study included 406 consecutive patients referred for CABG over a 2 year period. Baseline and clinical characteristics were collected. Angiographic data SS were interpreted by an experienced angiographer. Patients were divided into three groups based on SS tertiles: low ≤ 21 (n=205), intermediate 22–31 (n=138), and high ≥ 32 (n=63). Five year mortality was derived from the National Mortality Database.

Results: Compared with low SS, patients with intermediate and high scores were significantly older (P = 0.02), had lower left ventricular ejection fraction (64% vs. 52% and 48%, P < 0.001) and greater incidence of acute coronary syndrome, left main disease, presence of chronic total occlusion of the left anterior descending and/or right coronary artery, and a higher EuroSCORE (5% vs. 5% and 8%, P < 0.01). Patients with intermediate and high SS had higher 5 year mortality rates (18.1% and 19%, respectively) compared to patients with low score (9.8%, P = 0.04). On multivariate analysis, SS was not an independent predictor of late mortality.

Conclusion: Patients with lower SS had lower mortality after CABG, which is attributable to lower baseline risk. SS is not independently predictive of late mortality in patients with multi-vessel coronary artery disease undergoing CABG.

November 2014
Ran Stein MD, David Neufeld MD, Ivan Shwartz MD, Ilan Erez MD, Ilana Haas MD, Ada Magen MD, Elon Glassberg MD, Pavel Shmulevsky MD and Haim Paran MD FACS

Background: Discharge summaries after hospitalization provide the most reliable description and implications of the hospitalization. A concise discharge summary is crucial for maintaining continuity of care through the transition from inpatient to ambulatory care. Discharge summaries often lack information and are imprecise. Errors and insufficient recommendations regarding changes in the medical regimen may harm the patient’s health and may result in readmission.

Objectives: To evaluate a quality improvement model and training program for writing postoperative discharge summaries for three surgical procedures.

Methods: Medical records and surgical discharge summaries were reviewed and scored. Essential points for communication between surgeons and family physicians were included in automated forms. Staff was briefed twice regarding required summary contents with an interim evaluation. Changes in quality were evaluated.

Results: Summaries from 61 cholecystectomies, 42 hernioplasties and 45 colectomies were reviewed. The average quality score of all discharge summaries increased from 72.1 to 78.3 after the first intervention (P < 0.0005) to 81.0 following the second intervention. As the discharge summary’s quality improved, its length decreased significantly.

Conclusions: Discharge summaries lack important information and are too long. Developing a model for discharge summaries and instructing surgical staff regarding their contents resulted in measurable improvement. Frequent interventions and supervision are needed to maintain the quality of the surgical discharge summary.  

September 2014
Itai Horowitz MD, Alla Kaplan MD, Suzanna Mostovoy MD, Nurit El-Bar MD, Alex Gizunterman MD and Daniela Amital MD MHA
August 2014
June 2014
Ephraim Eviatar MD, Koby Pitaro MD, Haim Gavriel MD and Daniel Krakovsky MD

Background: Over the past 20 years, advances in endoscopic sinus surgery (ESS) techniques have led to widespread applications of this technology in both adult and pediatric populations with better results and lower morbidity.

Objectives: To update data regarding the rate of minor and major complications following ESS procedures that used powered instrumentation.

Methods: We retrospectively reviewed the charts of all patients who, with general anesthesia, underwent ESS utilizing powered instrumentation between January 1996 and December 2006. Age, gender, indication for surgery, length of hospitalization, and type and rate of surgical complications were recorded.

Results: A total of 1190 patients were included in our study (1309 surgeries). The male:female ratio was 1.7:1.0 and the average age was 39 years (range 4–86 years). The most common indication for surgery was chronic rhinosinusitis. The rate of major complications was 0.31% and that of minor complications 1.37%. The only major complication that occurred was cerebrospinal fluid leak. The minor complications included epistaxis, periorbital emphysema, ecchymosis and mucocele formation.

Conclusions: Compared to previously published series, the rate of major and minor complications in our study was low. The results indicate that the use of powered instruments during ESS is safe.

Nasser Sakran MD, David Goitein MD, Asnat Raziel MD, Dan Hershko MD and Amir Szold MD
 Background: Modifications to conventional laparoscopic cholecystectomy (CLC) are aimed at decreasing abdominal wall trauma and improving cosmetic outcome. Although single-incision laparoscopic surgery (SILS) provides excellent cosmetic results, the procedure is technically challenging and expensive compared to the conventional laparoscopic approach.

Objectives: To describe a novel, hybrid technique combining SILS and conventional laparoscopy using minimal abdominal wall incisions.

Methods: Fifty patients diagnosed with symptomatic cholelithiasis were operated using two reusable 5 mm trocars inserted through a single 15 mm umbilical incision and a single 2–3 mm epigastric port. This technique was dubbed “minimal incision laparoscopic cholecystectomy” (MILC).

Results: MILC was completed in 49 patients (98%). In five patients an additional 3 mm trocar was used and in 2 patients the epigastric trocar was switched to a 5 mm trocar. The procedure was converted to CLC in one patient. Mean operative time was 29 minutes (range 18–60) and the average postoperative hospital stay was 22 hours (range 6–50). There were no postoperative complications and the cosmetic results were rated excellent by the patients.

Conclusions: MILC is an intuitive, easy-to-learn and reproducible technique and requires small changes from CLC. As such, MILC may be an attractive alternative, avoiding the cost and complexity drawbacks associated with SILS.

March 2014
Lela Migirov, Gahl Greenberg, Ana Eyal and Michael Wolf
Cholesteatoma is an epidermoid cyst that is characterized by independent and progressive growth with destruction of adjacent tissues, especially the bone tissue, and tendency to recurrence. Treatment of cholesteatoma is essentially surgical. The choice of surgical technique depends on the extension of the disease, and preoperative otoscopic and radiological findings can be decisive in planning the optimal surgical approach. Cholesteatoma confined to the middle ear cavity and its extensions can be eradicated by use of the minimally invasive transmeatal endoscopic approach. Computerized tomography of the temporal bones fails to distinguish a cholesteatoma from the inflammatory tissue, granulations, fibrosis or mucoid secretions in 20–70% of cases showing opacification of the middle ear and mastoid. Using the turbo-spin echo (TSE), also known as non-echo planar imaging (non-EPI) diffusion-weighted (DW) magnetic resonance imaging, cholesteatoma can be distinguished from other tissues and from mucosal reactions in the middle ear and mastoid. Current MRI sequences can support the clinical diagnosis of cholesteatoma and ascertain the extent of the disease more readily than CT scans. The size determined by the TSE/HASTE (half-Fourier acquisition single-shot turbo-spin echo) DW sequences correlated well with intraoperative findings, with error margins lying within 1 mm. Our experience with more than 150 endoscopic surgeries showed that lesions smaller than 8 mm confined to the middle ear and its extension, as depicted by the non-EPI images, can be managed with transmeatal endoscopic approach solely. We call upon our otolaryngologist and radiologist colleagues to use the newest MRI modalities in the preoperative evaluation of candidates for cholesteatoma surgery.

February 2014
Renata Faermann, Fani Sperber, Schlomo Schneebaum and Daphna Barsuk
Background: The surgical approach to breast cancer has changed dramatically in the past 20 years. The surgical objective today is to remove the tumor, ensuring negative margins and good cosmetic results, and preserving the breast when possible. Magnetic resonance imaging of the breast has become an essential imaging tool prior to surgery, diagnosing additional tumors and assessing tumor extent. Tumor-to-breast volume ratio, an important predictor of breast conservation, can be measured with MRI and may change the surgical decision.

Objectives: To measure the tumor-to-breast volume ratio using MRI in order to assess whether there is a correlation between this ratio and the type of surgery selected (breast-conserving or mastectomy).

Methods: The volumes of the tumor and the breast and the tumor-to-breast volume ratio were retrospectively calculated using preoperative breast MRI in 76 patients who underwent breast-conserving surgery or mastectomy.

Results: Breast-conserving surgery (lumpectomy) was performed in 64 patients and mastectomy in 12. The average tumor-to-breast volume ratio was 0.06 (6%) in the lumpectomy group and 0.30 (30%) in the mastectomy group (P < 0.0001).

Conclusion: The tumor-to-breast volume ratio correlated with the type of surgery. As measured on MRI, this ratio is an accurate means of determining the type of surgery best suited for a given patient. It is recommended that MRI-determined tumor-to-breast volume ratio become part of the surgical planning protocol for patients diagnosed with breast cancer.

January 2014
Mona Boaz, Alexander Bermant, Tiberiu Ezri, Dror Lakstein, Yitzhak Berlovich, Iris Laniado RN and Zeev Feldbrin
Background: Surgical adverse events are errors that emerge during perioperative patient care. The World Health Organization recently published “Guidelines for Safe Surgery.”

Objectives: To estimate the effect of implementation of a safety checklist in an orthopedic surgical department.


Methods: We conducted a single-center cross-sectional study to compare the incidence of complications prior to and following implementation of the Guidelines for Safe Surgery checklist. The medical records of all consecutive adult patients admitted to the orthopedics department at Wolfson Medical Center during the period 1 July 2008 to 1 January 2009 (control group) and from 1 January 2009 to 1 July 2009 (study group) were reviewed. The occurrences of all complications were compared between the two groups.

Results: The records of 760 patients (380 in each group) hospitalized during this 12 month period were analyzed. Postoperative fever occurred in 5.3% vs. 10.6% of patients with and without the checklist respectively (P = 0.008). Significantly more patients received only postoperative prophylactic antibiotics rather than both pre-and postoperative antibiotic treatment prior to implementation of the checklist (3.2% vs. 0%, P = 0.004). In addition, a statistically non-significant 34% decrease in the rate of surgical wound infection was also detected in the checklist group. In a logistic regression model of postoperative fever, the checklist emerged as a significant independent predictor of this outcome: odds ratio 0.53, 95% confidence interval 0.29–0.96, P = 0.037.

Conclusion: A significant reduction in postoperative fever after the implementation of the surgical safety checklist was found. It is possible that the improved usage of preoperative prophylactic antibiotics may explain the reduction in postoperative fever.

Asnat Raziel, Nasser Sakran, Amir Szold, Ofir Teshuva, Mirit Krakovsky, Oded Rabau and David Goitein
 Background: Laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy (LSG) is gaining credibility   as a simple and efficient bariatric procedure with low surgical risk. Surgical treatment for morbid obesity is relatively rare in adolescents, hence few results have been accumulated so far.

Objectives: To prove the safety and efficacy of LSG surgery in an adolescent population

Methods: Data were prospectively collected regarding adolescent patients undergoing LSG. All patients underwent pre- and postoperative medical and professional evaluation by a multidisciplinary team.

Results: Between the years 2006 and 2011, 32 adolescents underwent LSG in our center (20 females and 12 males). Mean age was 16.75 years (range 14–18 years), mean weight was 121.88 kg (83–178 kg), and mean body mass index 43.23 (35–54). Thirty-four comorbid conditions were identified. In all the patients LSG was the primary bariatric procedure. Mean operative time was 60 minutes (range 45–80 min). There were two complications (6.25%): an early staple line leak and a late acute cholecystitis. There was no mortality. Mean percent excess weight loss at 1, 3, 6, 9,12, 24, 36, 48, and 60 months post-surgery was 27.9%, 41.1%, 62.6%, 79.2%, 81.7% , 71%, 75%, 102.9% and 101.6%, respectively. Comorbidities were completely resolved or ameliorated within 1 year following surgery in 82.4% and 17.6%, respectively.

Conclusions: LSG is feasible and safe in morbidly obese adolescents, achieving efficient weight loss and impressive resolution of comorbidities. Further studies are required to evaluate the long-term results of this procedure, as well as its place among other bariatric options. 

November 2013
I. Strauss, T. Jonas-Kimchi, Z. Lidar MD, D. Buchbut, N. Shtraus, B. W. Corn and A. A. Kanner
 Background: Radiation treatment of spinal and paraspinal tumors has been limited by the tolerance of the spinal cord. As such, therapeutic options are restricted to surgically accessible lesions or the use of suboptimal dosing of external beam irradiation.

Objectives: To evaluate the safety and applicability of the Elekta Synergy-S radiation unit for the treatment of spinal tumors.

Methods: We retrospectively reviewed all patients treated with stereotactic radiosurgery to spinal tumors between November 2007 and June 2011.

Results: Thirty-four patients were treated for 41 lesions. Treatment indications were local tumor control and pain palliation. The mean follow-up was 10.8 ± 11.6 months (range 0.5–38 months). No acute radiation toxicity or new neurological deficits occurred during the follow-up period. Local tumor control was achieved in 21 of the 24 lesions (87.5%) available for radiological follow-up at a median of 9.8 months (range 3–32 months). Good analgesia was achieved in 24/30 lesions (80%) that presented with intractable pain.

Conclusions: The safety and feasibility of delivering single and multiple-fraction stereotactic spinal irradiation was demonstrated and became a standard treatment option in our institution. 

Legal Disclaimer: The information contained in this website is provided for informational purposes only, and should not be construed as legal or medical advice on any matter.
The IMA is not responsible for and expressly disclaims liability for damages of any kind arising from the use of or reliance on information contained within the site.
© All rights to information on this site are reserved and are the property of the Israeli Medical Association. Privacy policy

2 Twin Towers, 35 Jabotinsky, POB 4292, Ramat Gan 5251108 Israel