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עמוד בית
Thu, 13.06.24

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July 2016
Meir Kestenbaum MD, Daphne Robakis MD, Blair Ford MD, Roy N. Alcalay MD MSc and Elan D. Louis MD MSc

Background: Only a minority of patients with essential tremor (ET) and Parkinson’s disease (PD) undergo deep brain stimulation (DBS) surgery. Data on patient selection factors are useful.

Objectives: To compare the clinical characteristics of ET and PD patients who underwent DBS surgery with those of patients who had not undergone surgery.

Methods: We abstracted data from the electronic medical records of 121 PD and 34 ET patients who underwent DBS surgery at Columbia University Medical Center during the period 2009–2014. We compared this group with 100 randomly selected PD and 100 randomly selected ET patients at the Center who had not undergone DBS surgery. 

Results: Among other differences, age of onset in PD patients who had undergone surgery was younger than in those who did not: 14.9% vs. 3.0% with onset before age 40 (P = 0.003). They had also tried nearly double the number of medications (3.9 ± 1.7 vs. 2.3 ± 1.5, P < 0.001). Interestingly, there was no difference in the proportion of patients with tremor (81.0% vs. 88.0%, P = 0.16). Medical co-morbidities (heart and lungs) were less common in the PD patients who underwent DBS surgery. In the ET group, tremor causing impairment in activities of daily living occurred in all surgical patients compared to 73.0% of non-surgical patients (P < 0.001). The former had tried nearly double the number of medications compared to the latter (3.2 ± 1.7 vs. 1.3 ± 1.3, P < 0.001).

Conclusions: These data add to our understanding of the numerous clinical factors associated with patient referral to DBS surgery. 

 

Mordechai Shimonov MD, Lior Leibou MD, Eduard Davidov MD, Olga Bernadsky MD, Julio Wainstein MD and Eyal Leibovitz MD

Background: Helicobacter pylori (HP) infection of the gastric mucosa may be involved in the development of insulin resistance (IR). 

Objectives: To investigate the association between HP status in stomach biopsies and weight reduction in patients who underwent laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy (LSG). 

Methods: In this retrospective analysis of medical charts, all patients who underwent LSG for weight reduction and had at least 1 year of follow-up were included. HP status was ascertained by two to four biopsies of the removed stomach. 

Results: The study group comprised 70 patients; their mean age was 45.9 ± 11.9 years and 31.9% were males. Fourteen patients (20%) tested positive for HP colonization in gastric mucosa. HP status was not associated with age or smoking status. No difference was noted in the rate of diabetes mellitus (DM) or hypertension, but patients with HP had lower rates of hyperlipidemia (0 vs. 29 patients, 52%, P < 0.001). Patients lost an average of 10.5 kg/m2 after 12 months of follow-up, and no difference was noted between HP-positive and HP-negative patients. The rate of DM control was also similar between HP-positive and HP-negative patients at baseline (33.3 vs. 29.4, P = NS) and at 12 months of follow-up (70% vs. 50%, P = NS). 

Conclusions: HP status was not associated with changes in metabolic profiles and co-morbidity status, or in the efficacy of LSG. 

 

June 2016
Michal Fertouk MD, Shahar Grunner MD, Zvi Peled MD, Zvi Adler MD, Oz M. Shapira MD and Gil Bolotin MD PhD
February 2016
Moshe Herskovitz MD and Yitzhak Schiller MD PhD

Background: Resective epilepsy surgery is an accepted treatment option for patients with drug-resistant epilepsy (DRE). Presurgical evaluation consists of a phase 1 non-invasive evaluation and a phase 2 invasive evaluation, when necessary.

Objectives: To assess the results of phase 1 evaluation in patients with focal DRE.

Methods: This observational retrospective study was performed in all consecutive DRE patients admitted to our clinic from January 2001 to July 2010, and who underwent a presurgical evaluation which included at least magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scan and long-term video EEG monitoring (LTVEM).

Results: A total of 253 consecutive patients with a diagnosis of DRE (according to the ILAE recommendations) who underwent presurgical evaluation were extracted from our clinic and department registry. In 45 of these patients either imaging or ictal video EEG data were missing; the final analysis therefore involved 208 patients. The combined result of the LTVEM and the MRI scan were as follows: 102 patients (49% of the cohort) had a lesion on the MRI scan, in 77 patients (37% of the cohort) the LTVEM results were localizing and congruent with the MRI findings, and in 25 patients (12% of the cohort) the LTVEM results were either non-localizing or incongruent with the MRI findings. In 106 patients (51% of the cohort) the MRI scan was normal or had a non-specific lesion. The LTVEM was localizing in 66 of these patients (31.7% of the cohort) and non-localizing in 40 (19.2% of the cohort).

Conclusions: Although some of the patients with focal DRE can be safely treated with resective surgery based solely on the findings of phase 1 evaluation, a substantial percent of patients do need to undergo a phase 2 evaluation before a final surgical decision is made.

 

January 2016
Yehuda Hershkovitz MD, Hasan Kais MD, Ariel Halevy MD and Ron Lavy MD

Background: The timing of interval laparoscopic cholecystectomy continues to be a matter of debate. 

Objectives: To evaluate the best timing for performing this procedure after an episode of acute cholecystitis. 

Methods: In this retrospective analysis, we divided 213 patients into three groups based on the time that elapsed since an episode of acute cholecystitis to surgery: Group I: 1–6 weeks, Group II: 6–12 weeks, Group III: > 12 weeks. 

Results: The mean operative time ranged from 50 to 62 minutes, complication rate from 2.6% to 5.9%, conversion rate from 2.6% to 10.8%, length of hospitalization from 1.55 to 2.2 days, and the 30 day readmission rate from 2.7% to 7.9%. There were no statistically significant differences between the study groups in the primary outcome parameters.

Conclusions: Due to the lack of statistically significant differences between the groups, interval laparoscopic cholecystectomy can be performed safely and without increasing the complication rate within 6 weeks following the acute episode as well as 12 weeks after. However, a trend towards higher conversion and complication rates was observed in Group II (6–12 weeks).

 

Eyal R. Nachum MD, Ehud Raanani MD, Amit Segev MD, Victor Guetta MD, Ilan Hai MD, Amihai Shinfeld MD, Paul Fefer MD, Hamdan Ashraf MD, Israel Barabash MD, Amjad Shalabi MD and Dan Spiegelstein MD

Background: The rate of mitral bioprosthesis implantation in clinical practice is increasing. Transcatheter valve-in-valve implantation has been described for high risk patients requiring redo valve surgery. 

Objectives: To report our experience with transapical valve-in-valve implantation for failed mitral bioprosthesis.

Methods: Since 2010, 10 patients have undergone transapical valve-in-valve implantation for failed bioprosthesis in our center. Aortic valve-in-valve implantation was performed in one of them and mitral valve-in-valve implantation in nine. Mean age was 82 ± 4 years and 6 were female (67%). Mean time from original mitral valve (MV) replacement to valve-in-valve procedure was 10.5 ± 3.7 years. Follow-up was completed by all patients with a mean duration of 13 ± 12 months. 

Results: Preoperatively, all patients presented with significant mitral regurgitation; two with mitral stenosis due to structural valve failure. All nine patients underwent successful transapical valve-in-valve implantation with an Edwards Sapien™ balloon expandable valve. There was no in-hospital mortality. Mean and median hospital duration was 15 ± 18 and 7 days respectively. Valve implantation was successful in all patients and there were no major complications, except for major femoral access bleeding in one patient. At last follow-up, all patients were alive and in NYHA functional class I or II. Echocardiography follow-up demonstrated that mitral regurgitation was absent or trivial in seven patients and mild in two. At follow-up, peak and mean gradients changed from 26 ± 4 and 8 ± 2 at baseline to 16.7 ± 3 and 7.3 ± 1.5, respectively.

Conclusions: Transcatheter transapical mitral valve-in-valve implantation for failed bioprosthesis is feasible in selected high risk patients. Our early experience with this strategy is encouraging. Larger randomized trials with long-term clinical and echocardiographic follow-up are recommended.

 

November 2015
Asnat Raziel MD, Nasser Sakran MD, Amir Szold MD, Judith Sandbank MD, Dan Hershko MD and David Goitein MD

Background: Gallbladder (GB) cancer is rare. Most cases are incidentally found in specimens after a cholecystectomy. Cholelithiasis is almost always present when this diagnosis is made. Obesity is a known risk factor for gallstone formation and thus may be related to GB cancer. 

Objectives: To highlight the importance of evaluation of the gallbladder before surgery, resection of the gallbladder whenever required, and screening the resected tissue for malignancy.

Methods: We retrospectively queried a prospectively maintained database of all bariatric procedures during the last 8 years for cases of concomitant laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy (LSG) and laparoscopic cholecystectomy (LC). Pathologic reports of the gallbladders were reviewed. Demographic data and perioperative parameters were documented. 

Results: Of 2708 patients reviewed, 1721 (63.55%) were females and 987 (36.45%) males. Excluded were 145 (5.35%) who had a previous cholecystectomy. Of the remaining 2563, 180 (7.02%) had symptomatic gallbladder disease and underwent LSG with LC. Of these, two females (BMI 53 kg/m² and BMI 47 kg/m², both age 60) were found by histological examination to have adenocarcinoma in their GB specimens (1.11%). Both were reoperated, which included partial hepatectomy of the GB bed, resection of the cystic stump, lymph node dissection, and resection of the port sites. One patient is doing well, with no evidence of disease at a postoperative follow-up of 4 years. The second patient had recurrent disease with peritoneal spread and ascites 20 months post-surgery and died 18 months later. 

Conclusions: GB cancer is a rare finding in cholecystectomy specimens. The incidence of this entity might be higher in obese older females owing to the higher incidence of cholelithiasis in these patients. 

 

October 2015
David Goitein MD, Alex Zendel MD, Lior Segev MD, Anya Feigin MD and Douglas Zippel MD

Background: Obesity causes specific sexual problems, including diminished sexual desire, poor performance and avoidance of sexual encounters.

Objectives: To systematically evaluate the effect of bariatric surgery on patients' sexual function as compared to their preoperative status.

Methods: Bariatric surgery candidates were given a validated sexual function questionnaire the day before surgery and again 1 year after surgery. Females were polled with the Female Sexual Function Index (FSFI) and males with the Brief Sexual Function Inventory (BSFI). Statistical analysis was performed to elucidate differences in response to the questionnaires.

Results: The study population included 34 females and 14 males. Mean age and body mass index (BMI) were 40.2 ± 10.2 years and 43.4 ± 5.3 kg/m2, respectively. Postoperative BMI was 31.4 ± 4.9 kg/m2 (P < 0.001). Laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy was performed in 36 patients and laparoscopic Roux-y gastric bypass in 12. In females, the FSFI index rose significantly from 24 to 30 (P = 0.006), indicating increased sexual performance and satisfaction. In males the BSFI increased from 40.2 to 43.9 but did not reach statistical significance (P = 0.08). However, general satisfaction, desire and erection were each significantly improved within the BSFI.

Conclusions: In addition to the well-documented medical and quality-of-life benefits of bariatric surgery, there is also clear improvement in patients' sexual function, both physical and psychosexual.

 

September 2015
Emad Matanes MD, Sari Boulus MD and Lior Lowenstein MD MS

Background: In the last decade the number of robotic devices and the medical procedures utilizing them increased significantly around the world.

Objective: To evaluate the implementation of robotic surgeries in Israel in various surgical disciplines.

Methods: We conducted a retrospective study accessing information about the annual purchases of robots, the number of physicians trained for their use, and the number of robotic surgeries performed each year, according to indications of surgery and the disciplines of the operating medical staff. The data were taken from the database of Intuitive Surgical Inc.

Results: Six robots were purchased by six medical centers in Israel during the years 2008–2013. There are currently 150 physicians trained to use the robot in one of the simulators of Intuitive Surgical Inc. Of them, 104 are listed as active robotic surgeons. Most of these physicians are urologists, gynecologists, or general surgeons. The number of robotic surgeries increased each year in all fields in which it was implemented. In 2013, 975 robotic surgeries were performed in Israel. Of them, 52% were performed by urologists; 80% of which were radical prostatectomy. 

Conclusions: The use of robotic surgery increased considerably in Israel over recent years, in urology, gynecology, general surgery, and otolaryngology. Despite the lack of conclusive evidence of the advantages of robotic surgery over the laparoscopic approach, the market power and the desire to be at the technological forefront drive many medical centers to purchase the robot and to train physicians in its use.

 

August 2015
Michail Papoulas MD and Stergios Douvetzemis MD

Most of the terminology in medicine originates from Greek or Latin, revealing the impact of the ancient Greeks on modern medicine. However, the literature on the etymology of Greek words used routinely in medical practice is sparse. We provide a short guide to the etymology and meaning of Greek words currently used in the field of hepatopancreatobiliary (HPB) anatomy and surgery. Focusing on HPB medical literature, the etymology and origin of Greek words including suffixes and prefixes are shown and analyzed. Thus, anatomy (anatomia) is a Greek word derived from the prefix ana- (on, upon) and the suffix -tomy from the verb temno meaning to cut. Surgery, however, is not a Greek word. The corresponding Greek word is chirourgiki derived from the cheir (hand) and the ergon (action, work) meaning the action made by hands. Understanding the root of Greek terminology leads to an accurate, precise and comprehensive scientific medical language, reflecting the need for a universal medical language as a standardized means of communication within the health care sector. 

 

July 2015
Michael Papiashvili MD, Ehud Deviri MD, Ilan Bar MD and Lior Sasson MD

Background: The efficacy of video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery lobectomy in patients with previous coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) surgery is controversial.

Objectives: To investigate whether skeletonized left internal mammary artery (LIMA) mobilization contributes to the development of severe adhesions, which will affect what type of lung surgery (open or closed procedure) will be required in the future.

Methods: Eight patients (mean age 73.9 years) with previous CABG surgery using a LIMA to left anterior descending (LAD) graft underwent left-sided lobectomy for operable non-small cell lung carcinoma. 

Results: The lobectomy by thoracotomy rate was 62.5% (5 patients), generally in patients with tumors in the left upper lobe or in patients post-neoadjuvant chemotherapy, while the video-assisted thoracic surgery lobectomy rate was 37.5% (3 patients). Mean hospital stay was 8.3 days. There was no mortality or major morbidity, apart from six minor complications in four patients (50%) (air leak, atrial fibrillation, atelectasis, pneumonia). 

Conclusions: Patients with operable non-small cell lung carcinoma following CABG surgery who need left upper lobe resection do not benefit from the video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery technique due to significant adhesions between the LIMA to LAD graft and the lung. The method of preserving a small portion of the lung on the LIMA to LAD graft may help during left upper lobe resections. Adhesions in the left pleural space after LIMA mobilization appear to generally minimally affect left lower lobe video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery.

 

June 2015
Michael Papiashvili MD, Henri Hayat MD, Letizia Schreiber MD and Israel E. Priel MD
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