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עמוד בית
Mon, 15.04.24

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May 2010
H. Vaknin-Assa, A. Assali, E. Lev, I. Ben-Dor, D. Brosh, I. Teplitsky and R. Kornowski

Background: The best therapeutic alternative for patients suffering from in-stent restenosis after drug-eluting stent implantation remains to be elucidated.

Objective: To characterize the pattern, treatment and outcomes of DES[1]-related in-stent restenosis in patients treated at our institution.

Methods: We determined the incidence and major adverse clinical events in 71 consecutive patients with DES failure among 2473 patients who were treated with 2548 drug-eluting stents between 2004 and 2007. We analyzed the clinical data, procedural parameters and clinical outcomes.

Results: The type and number of stents implanted were as follows: Cypher (n=1808), Endeavor (421) and Taxus (319) of these, 53 (2.9%), 10 (2.4%), and 8 (2.5%) patients respectively presented with restenosis. The mean time to restenosis was 11.3 ± 9.9 months. Patients’ mean age was 65 ± 11 years 75% were male, and 68% had diabetes mellitus. Unstable angina was the clinical presentation in 52 (73%). At 6 months, 3 patients had developed myocardial infarction (4.2%), repeat restenosis at follow-up was diagnosed in 8 patients (11.3%), the overall major adverse clinical events rate was 18.3% (13 patients), and 2 patients died (2.8%).

Conclusions: Drug-eluting stent-related restenosis is relatively infrequent but remains a clinical challenge. It occurs more frequently in complex lesion subsets, but the overall intermediate-term prognosis is tolerable.
 

[1] DES = drug-eluting stent

March 2010
O. Kobo, M. Hammoud, N. Makhoul, H. Omary and U. Rosenschein

Background: Renal artery stenosis is one of the most frequent causes of secondary hypertension. Appropriate methods for screening, diagnosis and therapy are currently under debate.

Objectives: To evaluate and recommend methods for screening and diagnosing renal artery stenosis, and to assess the clinical outcomes of renal artery stenting.

Methods: A total of 450 patients undergoing non-emergent coronary angiography fulfilled the selection criteria for selective renal arteriography; those with severe (luminal narrowing ≥ 70%) renal artery stenosis underwent percutaneous transluminal renal angioplasty with renal artery stenting.

Results: Of 166 patients (36.9%) with renal artery stenosis, 41 (9.1%) had severe stenosis that required renal artery stenting, and 83% had ostial renal stenosis. The primary success rate was 100% and there were no complications. During the follow-up period, two patients required a second PTRA[1]. After stent deployment, significant reductions were observed in systolic and diastolic pressures (P < 0.001 and P = 0.01, respectively) and in the number of antihypertensive drugs used by the patients (P < 0.001). These reductions were sustained during follow-up. Hypertension was cured (systolic blood pressure < 130 mmHg) in 9 (21.4%) and improved in 27 (64.3%) patients. Plasma creatinine did not change significantly.

Conclusions: Selective renal angiography is an effective diagnostic tool for identifying symptomatic cases of renal artery stenosis in patients undergoing coronary angiography. Our finding of a high success rate and low complication rate supports the use of primary renal artery stenting in symptomatic patients with renal artery stenosis.






[1] PTRA = percutaneous transluminal renal angioplasty


January 2010
Y. Anekstein, Y. Smorgick, R. Lotan, G. Agar, E. Shalmon, Y. Floman and Y. Mirovsky

Background: Diabetes mellitus is a multi-organ disorder affecting many types of connective tissues, including bone and cartilage. Certain skeletal changes are more prevalent in diabetic patients than in non-diabetic individuals. A possible association of diabetes mellitus and lumbar spinal stenosis has been raised.

Objectives: To compare the prevalence of diabetes mellitus in patients with spinal stenosis, degenerative disk disease or osteoporotic vertebral fractures.

Methods: A cross-sectional analysis was performed of 395 consecutive patients diagnosed with spinal stenosis, degenerative disk disease or osteoporotic vertebral fractures. All the patients were examined by one senior author in the outpatient orthopedic clinic of a large general hospital between June 2004 and January 2006 and diagnosed as having either lumbar spinal stenosis (n=225), degenerative disk disease (n=124) or osteoporotic vertebral fractures (n=46).

Results: The prevalence of diabetes mellitus in the three groups (spinal stenosis, osteoporotic fracture, degenerative disk disease) was 28%, 6.5% and 12.1%, respectively, revealing a significantly higher prevalence in the spinal stenosis group compared with the others (P = 0.001). The higher prevalence of diabetes in the stenotic patients was unrelated to the presence of degenerative spondylolisthesis.

Conclusions: There is an association between diabetes and lumbar spinal stenosis. Diabetes mellitus may be a predisposing factor for the development of lumbar spinal stenosis.

December 2009
A.Y. Gur, L. Shopin and N.M. Bornstein

Background: Intravenous tissue plasminogen activator has been approved treatment for acute (≤ 3 hours) ischemic stroke in Israel since late 2004. The Israeli experience with IV tPA[1] is still limited. Several factors may influence the response to IV thrombolysis, including time-to-treatment parameters and tandem internal carotid artery/middle cerebral artery stenosis/occlusion.

Objectives: To compare our experience with IV tPA treatment of patients with acute ischemic stroke to the findings of the SITS-MOST (Safe Implementation of Thrombolysis in Stroke-MOnitoring STudy, international data) and of the Sheba Medical Center (national data) and to compare the early outcome among patients with ischemic stroke in the MCA[2] with and without severe ICA[3] stenosis.

Methods: We obtained demographic data, timing details, stroke severity, hemorrhagic complications, mortality, and early outcome from the records of IV tPA-treated acute ischemic stroke patients.

Results: Fifty-eight patients (median age 69 years, 26 females) with acute ischemic stroke were treated by IV tPA at the Tel Aviv Sourasky Medical Center in 2006–2007. Median time between stroke onset and IV tPA administration was 148 minutes for the Sourasky center, 150 minutes for the Sheba center, and 140 minutes for SITS-MOST. The Sourasky mortality rate was 10.5%. Of the 31 patients who suffered MCA stroke, 8 had severe ipsilateral ICA stenosis. These 8 had significantly lower neurological improvement than the 23 without ipsilateral ICA stenosis (1/8 versus 15/23, P <0.001).

Conclusions: Our data demonstrate fairly similar parameters of IV tPA treatment compared to other centers and suggest that patients with severe ICA stenosis might be less likely to benefit from IV tPA.


 




[1] tPA = tissue plasminogen activator



[2] MCA = middle cerebral artery



[3] ICA = internal carotid artery


October 2009
E. Atar, R. Avrahami, Y. Koganovich, S. Litvin, M. Knizhnik and A. Belenky

Background: Critical limb ischemia is an increasingly common condition that has high surgical morbidity and limited non-surgical options.  

Objectives: To evaluate the use of silicon carbide-coated Motion stents, as compared to reported data for bare metal stents, in elderly patients with infrapopliteal artery stenoses causing critical limb ischemia after failed or complicated percutaneous transluminal angioplasty.

Methods: Between January 2003 and March 2004, 41 stents were inserted into 17 consecutive patients (11 males, 6 females, mean age 82 years, range 75–93) following unsuccessful or complicated PTA[1]. Seven patients had one-vessel run-off, six had two-vessel and four had three vessel run-off. All patients suffered from CLI[2], had up to three lesions and more than one co-morbid condition, and were considered at high surgical risk. Silicon carbide-coated Motion coronary stents, 2.5–4 mm diameter and 25 and 30 mm length, were used. Pre-intervention assessment included clinical condition, ankle brachial index, Doppler ultrasound and digital subtracted angiography. Post-intervention evaluation included clinical condition, ABI[3], and Doppler ultrasound at 3, 6 and 12 months.

Results: The technical success rate per lesion was 100% (41/41). Two patients died of unrelated causes after 2 and 8 months respectively. Primary patency rates with duplex ultrasound were 68.7% (11/16) at 3 months, 43.7% (7/16) at 6 months and 40% (6/15) after 12 months. Nine patients developed complete occlusion in 13 stents; three of these patients underwent a below-knee amputation and two patients a partial foot amputation. Re-intervention (PTA only) was performed in 7 patients (43.7%). Secondary patency rate was 81.2% (13/16) at 6 months and 60% (9/15) at one year. Mean ABI index had improved at 6 months from 0.32 to 0.67, and to 0.53 at one year. Clinical improvement was evident in 87.5% (14/16) at 6 months and in 66.6% (10/15) at one year.

Conclusions: Silicon carbide-coated stents are comparable to bare metal stents after 6 and 12 months in infrapopliteal interventions in CLI when stenting is indicated.


 




[1] PTA = percutaneous transluminal angioplasty



[2] CLI = critical limb ischemia



[3] ABI = ankle brachial index


April 2009
D. Dvir, A. Assali, H. Vaknin, A. Sagie, Y. Shjapira, A. Battler, E. Porat and R. Kornowski

The incidence of aortic valve stenosis is growing rapidly in the elderly. Nonetheless, many symptomatic patients are not referred for surgery usually because of high surgical risk. Unfortunately, percutaneous balloon valvuloplasty is unsatisfactory due to high recurrence rates. In 2002, Cribier and colleagues were the first to describe percutaneous aortic valve implantation, opening a new era of aortic stenosis management. In the present review we report a patient treated by this novel method, discuss and assess how it is implanated, report the findings of studies conducted to date, and suggest future directions for percutaneous treatment of aortic valve disease.
 

September 2008
February 2008
I. Kimiagar, C. Klein, J.M. Rabey, A. Peer, E. Kaluski, M. Zaretsky

Background: Carotid artery stenting is used as an alternative to surgical endarterectomy.

Objectives: To determine the outcome of CAS[1] in a retrospective cohort of patients.

Methods: Between July 1999 and March 2003, 56 consecutive patients with carotid artery stenosis who were considered ineligible for surgery were treated (45 male, 11 female, mean age 69). All cases were performed prior to the introduction of distal protective devices in Israel.

Results: Intraprocedural complications included transient neurological findings in 5 patients (8%), cerebrovascular accident in 2 (3%), hemodynamic changes in 11 (18%), and 4 procedural failures. Post-procedural complications included transient ischemic attack in 3 patients and cardiovascular accident in 6 (10%). At 30 days follow-up, three patients (5%) remained with signs of CVA[2]. Two patients (3%) died during the post-procedural period and 16 (28%) during the 5 year follow-up, one due to recurrent CVA and the remainder to non-neurological causes. Five-year carotid Doppler follow-up was performed in 25 patients (45%), which revealed normal stent flow in 21 (84%), 50–60% restenosis in 3 patients (12%) and > 70% restenosis in one patient (4%).

Conclusions: This study confirms that stent procedures are beneficial for symptomatic carotid stenosis in patients not eligible for surgery.






[1] CAS = carotid artery stenting

[2] CVA = cardiovascular accident


August 2007
M. Wolf, A. Primov-Fever, Y.P. Talmi and J. Kronenberg

Background: Posterior glottic stenosis is a complication of prolonged intubation, manifesting as airway stenosis that may mimic bilateral vocal cord paralysis. It presents a variety of features that mandate specific surgical interventions.

Objectives: To summarize our experience with PSG[1] and its working diagnosis.

Methods: We conducted a retrospective review of a cohort of adult patients with PGS operated at the Sheba Medical Center between 1994 and 2006.

Results: Ten patients were diagnosed with PGS, 6 of whom also had stenosis at other sites of the larynx and trachea. Since 2000, all patients underwent laryngeal electromyographic studies and direct laryngoscopy prior to surgery. Surgical interventions included endoscopic laser procedures (in 2 patients), laryngofissure and scar incision (in 1), laryngofissure with buccal mucosa grafting (in 3) or with costal cartilage grafting (in 1), laryngofissure with posterior cricoid split and stenting (in 1); one patient was not suitable for surgery. Postoperative follow-up included periodical fiberoptic endoscopies. Voice analysis was evaluated by the GRBAS grading. Seven patients were successfully decannulated within one to three procedures. Voice quality was defined as good in 7 patients, serviceable in 2 and aphonic in 1.

Conclusions: Posterior glottic stenosis may be isolated or part of complex laryngotracheal pathologies. Electromyographic studies and direct laryngoscopy must be included in the diagnostic workup. Costal cartilage or buccal mucosa grafts are reliable, safe and successful with respect to graft incorporation and subglottic remodeling.

 






[1] PSG = posterior glottic stenosis


June 2007
R. Gepstein, Z. Arinzon, Y. Folman, S. Shabat, A. Adunsky

Background: Surgery for spinal stenosis is a frequent procedure in elderly patients. Presentation, hospital course and outcome of disease, including pain perception, may vary among patients of different ethnic origin.

Objectives: To evaluate whether differences in various medical indicators can explain differences in pain perception between two ethnic groups

Methods: We conducted a case-control study on the experience of two spinal units treating a mixed Arab and Jewish population, and compared the data on 85 Arab and 189 Jewish patients undergoing spinal lumbar surgery.

Results: Arab patients were younger (P = 0.027), less educated (P < 0.001), had a higher body mass index (P = 0.004) and included a higher proportion of diabetics (P = 0.013). Preoperative pain intensity (P = 0.023) and functional disability (P = 0.005) were more prominent, and factors associated with pre- or postoperative pain perception differed between the two ethnic groups. Despite these differences, results on follow-up were similar with respect to pain perception and level of disability.

Conclusions: A better understanding of ethnic differences is crucial for predicting surgery outcomes.

 
 

August 2006
A. Primov-Fever, Y.P. Talmi, A. Yellin and M. Wolf
 Background: Intubation and tracheostomy are the most common causes of benign acquired airway stenosis. Management varies according to different conceptions and techniques.

Objectives: To review our experience with cricotracheal resection and to assess related pitfalls and complications.

Methods: We examined the records of all patients who underwent CTR[1] in a tertiary referral medical center during the period January 1995 to April 2005.

Results: The study included 61 patients (16 women and 45 men) aged 15–81 years. In 17 patients previous interventions had failed, mostly dilatation and T-tube insertion. Complete obstruction was noted in 19 patients and stenosis > 70% in 26. Concomitant lesions included impaired vocal cord mobility (n=8) and tracheo-esophageal fistula (n=5). Cricotracheal anastomosis was performed in 42 patients, thyrotracheal in 12 and tracheotracheal in 7. A staged procedure was planned for quadriplegic patients and for three others with bilateral impaired vocal cord mobility. Restenosis occurred in six patients who were immediately revised with T-tube stenting. Decanulation was eventually achieved in 57 patients (93.4%). Complications occurred in 25 patients, the most common being subcutaneous emphysema (n=5). One patient died of acute myocardial infarction on the 14th postoperative day.

Conclusions: CTR is a relatively safe procedure with a high success rate in primary and revised procedures. A staged procedure should be planned in specific situations, namely, quadriplegics and patients with bilateral impaired vocal cord mobility. 


 





[1] CTR = cricotracheal resection


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