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עמוד בית
Tue, 23.04.24

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December 2022
Asaf Miller MD, Danny Epstein MD, Hanna Amouri MD

A 49-year-old woman presented to the emergency department with a 3-day history of altered mental status. The patient’s medical history was unremarkable, and she did not take medications.

October 2019
Adi Elias MD, Rudi Hamoudi MD, Naama Schwartz PHD, Gilat Ron MPH and Mazen Elias MD

Background: Recurrent miscarriages are associated with a high prevalence of thrombophilia. Use of a calibrated automated thrombogram (CAT) can serve as a universal test for thrombophilia.

Objectives: To examine whether thrombin generation measured by CAT is elevated during the first trimester in women with unexplained recurrent miscarriages.

Methods: This study comprised 25 pregnant women with recurrent pregnancy loss referred for thrombophilia screening and treated with low-molecular-weight heparin (LMWH). Thrombin generation parameters were measured in women who had miscarriages or live births and who were diagnosed as positive or negative for thrombophilia.

Results: Of the pregnancies, 76% resulted in live birth and 24% ended in miscarriages. Among the women, 76% were positive for thrombophilia. Thrombin generation parameters between pregnancies that ended in miscarriage compared to live births were not significantly different, and CAT parameters failed to predict pregnancy outcome. Although the CAT parameters demonstrated a trend toward a hypercoagulable state in women with thrombophilia, there was no statistical significance (P > 0.05).

Conclusions: Women with unexplained pregnancy loss demonstrated similar thrombin generation in the first trimester, regardless of the pregnancy outcome. CAT parameters failed to predict pregnancy outcome in women with recurrent unexplained pregnancy loss. Our results should be interpreted with caution due to the small number of participants.

March 2017
Marina Pekar-Zlotin MD, Yaakov Melcer MD, Orna Levinsohn-Tavor MD, Josef Tovbin MD, Zvi Vaknin MD and Ron Maymon MD
February 2017
Alexander Margulis MD, Allan Billig MD, Jhonatan Elia MD, Yair Shachar MD and Neta Adler MD

Background: Burn scar reconstruction is extremely challenging, even for the most proficient reconstructive surgeon. Within the arsenal of tools at the plastic surgeon’s disposal, tissue expansion provides an efficient modality for reconstruction despite the reported complication rates. 

Objectives: To critically review our experience with tissue expansion for burn scar reconstruction, comparing particularly the adult and pediatric populations.

Methods: We conducted a retrospective study of the outcomes of patients who underwent burn scar reconstruction with tissue expansion at Hadassah Medical Center between January 2003 and July 2012. The data included patient age, anatomical site of expansion, number of procedures, and associated complications. The outcomes of the above-mentioned populations were also compared with those in a control group of patients undergoing reconstruction with tissue expansion for indications other than burn scars. 

Results: Sixty-seven tissue expansion procedures were carried out in 50 patients, 42 in the pediatric population (< 16 years of age) and 25 in the adult population. Complications were observed in 10 of the 42 pediatric procedures (23.8%) and in 3 of the 25 adult procedures (12%). This difference was found to be statistically significant. When the complication rate for each population was compared to its control group (tissue expansion for indications other than burn scar reconstruction, such as reconstruction for motor vehicle accident scarring, congenital nevi, or vascular malformations), no statistically significant difference was found between them (complication rates 19.8% and 12.5%, respectively). Furthermore, there was no statistically significant difference in complication rates between the different anatomical areas of expansion within both populations undergoing burn scar reconstruction. Most of the complicated cases completed successful reconstruction.

Conclusions: Tissue expansion is a useful surgical tool in post-burn scar reconstruction, both in the adult and pediatric populations and in all anatomic sites, despite consistently high complication rates, especially in the pediatric population. This complication rate is not higher than in patients undergoing tissue expansion for indications other than burn scar reconstruction. 

April 2016
Nicola A. Pascarelli PhD, Sara Cheleschi PhD, Giovanni Bacaro PhD, Giacomo M. Guidelli MD, Mauro Galeazzi MD and Antonella Fioravanti MD PhD

Background: Balneotherapy is one of the most commonly used non-pharmacological approaches for osteoarthritis (OA). Recent data indicate that some biomarkers could be useful to predict OA progression and to assess therapeutic response.

Objectives: To evaluate the effects of mud-bath therapy on serum biomarkers in patients with knee OA. 

Methods: The study group comprised 103 patients with primary symptomatic bilateral knee OA who were randomly assigned to receive a cycle of mud-bath therapy over a period of 2 weeks or to continue their standard therapy alone. Clinical and biochemical parameters were assessed at baseline and after 2 weeks. Clinical assessments included global pain score on a Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) and the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Index (WOMAC) subscores for knee OA. Cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP), C-terminal cross-linked telopeptide type II collagen (CTX-II), myeloperoxidase (MPO) and high sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP) serum levels were assessed by ELISA.

Results: At the end of mud-bath therapy we observed a statistically significant improvement in VAS and WOMAC subscores. Serum levels of COMP, MPO and hsCRP did not show any significant modification in both groups, while a significant increase (P < 0.001) in CTX-II serum levels was observed in the mud-bath group after the treatment.

Conclusions: A cycle of mud-bath therapy added to usual treatment had a beneficial effect on pain and function in patients with knee OA. The evaluation of serum biomarkers showed only a significant increase of CTX-II, perhaps due to an increase of cartilage turnover induced by thermal stress.

January 2015
Lior Leibou MD, Oscar Herman MD, Jacob Frand MD, Eyal Kramer MD and Shimonov Mordechai MD
November 2014
Ricardo Silvariño MD MSc, Oscar Noboa MD and Ricard Cervera MD PhD FRCP
Basement membranes form an anatomic barrier that contains connective tissue. They are composed of type IV collagen, laminin and proteoglycans. Anti-basement membrane antibodies bind to the non-collagen site of the α3 chain of type IV collagen. A group of renal diseases, pulmonary diseases and perhaps others affecting different organs have long been associated with the presence of antibodies directed against glomerular basement membrane (GBM), alveolar basement membrane and tubular basement membrane. Goodpasture disease has a frequency of 0.5 to 1 case by million/year, and is responsible for up to 20% of crescentic glomerulonephritis in renal biopsy. It has been associated with genetic and immune abnormalities and there are usually environmental triggers preceding clinical onset. Renal disease can occur isolated or in association with pulmonary hemorrhage. In general, renal disease has a rapid progression that determines severe compromise, with rare spontaneous resolution. The diagnosis of Goodpasture disease requires the presence of the anti-GBM antibody, either in circulation or in renal tissue. The prognosis of non-treated patients is poor. The standard of care is plasma exchange combined with prednisone and cyclophosphamide. Anti-GBM antibody levels must be monitored frequently until their disappearance, and then every 6 months to confirm sustained remission in the absence of clinical signs of recurrence. Prognosis of the disease is strongly associated with its initial presentation. Survival rates are related to the degree of renal compromise at onset of the disease. Recurrence of the disease post-transplantation is low.
July 2014
Arnon Blum MD, Saleh Nazzal MD and Avi Peretz PhD
May 2014
Zeeshan Ramzan MD and Florian Anzengruber MD
April 2014
Eyal Kramer MD, Oscar Herman MD, Jacob Frand MD, Lior Leibou MD, Letizia Schreiber MD and Hananya Vaknine MD
 Background: Basal cell carcinoma (BCC) is the most common malignancy in humans. Several factors have been associated with the biological behavior of these tumors, including histopathologic type, depth of tumor invasion, perineural invasion, and the expression of several biologic markers including Ki67, a proliferative marker. Previous studies assessing the relationship between the proliferative fraction, as expressed by Ki67, and the histologic variants of BCC as well as its association with the tendency to recur, failed to illustrate significant statistical correlation.

Objectives: To examine the proliferative index, as expressed by Ki67, in various subtypes of basal cell carcinoma, and to assess its relationship to various histological and clinical variables.

Methods: In this retrospective study 51 lesions of BCC were examined. In each case, the following data were gathered: demographic (age and gender), anatomic location, size of the lesion, and clinical follow-up.  Each case was stained immunohistochemically with anti-Ki67 antigen (MIB-1), and the proliferative index was determined. Histologic analysis was performed for the following data: presence of an ulcer, intensity of inflammatory infiltrate, histologic subtype, mitotic count, and the presence of perineural invasion.

Results: Basal cell carcinoma exhibited a wide variation of proliferative indices, ranging from 1% to 61%. A significant statistical correlation was observed between the proliferative index and the mitotic activity, tumor ulceration and brisk tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes.

Conclusions: The wide variation in the degree of proliferation (from almost no activity to highly proliferative tumors) suggests that basal cell carcinoma exhibits a wide spectrum of biological characteristics. Ulcerated lesions were characterized by high proliferative index. No true correlation was demonstrated between the proliferative index and the aggressive histologic subtypes, implying that other factors were more biologically significant. The degree of proliferation also showed significant statistical correlation with the degree of tumor infiltration by lymphocytes. The significance of this proliferation-associated increased immunogenicity needs to be further studied.

February 2014
Salman Zarka, Masad Barhoum, Tarif Bader, Itay Zoaretz, Elon Glassberg, Oscar Embon and Yitshak Kreiss
December 2013
Nir Samuel, Anat K. Politansky, Ron Hoffman, Shlomit Itzkovich and Hanna Mandel
November 2012
L. Leibou, J. Frand, M. Sadeh, A. Lossos, E. Kremer, A. Livneh, D. Yarnitsky, O. Herman and R. Dabby

Background: Transthyretin (TTR)-associated familial amyloid polyneuropathy (FAP) is an autosomal dominant multisystem disease with neurological and extra-neurological manifestations. It is caused by various mutations in the TTR gene leading to the formation of insoluble amyloid.

Objectives: To describe the clinical and genetic findings in patients with TTR-associated FAP in Israel.

Methods: We evaluated eight patients clinically and genetically during the years 2006 to 2011.

Results: At onset, all the patients exhibited sensory loss of the lower and upper limbs, five patients experienced muscle pain, and one patient had lower limb weakness. Five patients had autonomic nervous system manifestations, and four demonstrated evidence of amyloid cardiomyopathy. Nerve conduction studies showed sensorimotor axonal neuropathy in all patients. Sural nerve biopsies were obtained in five patients; only three biopsies revealed amyloid deposit. In four patients of Yemenite descent, genetic analysis of the TTR gene demonstrated ser77tyr mutation. One patient of Tunisian descent and one Ashkenazi patient harbored the val30met mutation. One patient of Iranian descent showed val32ala mutation, and another Ashkenazi patient showed phe33leu mutation.

Conclusions: TTR-associated FAP is a progressive and fatal disease that exists in the Israeli population and is unproportionally common among Yemenite Jews. This disease may be under-diagnosed and should be considered in the differential diagnosis of any patient with rapidly progressive neuropathy, especially with autonomic involvement or extra-neural features. The absence of amyloid in nerve biopsy should not rule out the diagnosis.  
 

May 2012
A. Zamora-Ustaran, R.O. Escarcega-Alarcón, M. Garcia-Carrasco, E. Faugier, S. Mendieta-Zeron, C. Mendoza-Pinto, Á. Montiel-Jarquin, M. Muñoz-Guarneros, A. Lopez-Colombo and R. Cervera

Background: Data on pediatric antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) are very sparse.

Objectives: To describe the main clinical characteristics, laboratory data and complications of pediatric APS patients, and to analyze the differences between primary APS and APS associated with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE).

Methods: We retrospectively reviewed clinical and laboratory data of 32 children at “Federico Gomez,” the children’s hospital of México. Nineteen patients had SLE, 12 (37.5%) had primary APS and 1 (3%) had immune thrombocytopenic purpura. We collected information on sociodemographic variables, vaccinations, age at onset, and family history of rheumatic disease, hematological disorders, skin disorders and non-thrombotic neurological disorders. Immunological features included immunoglobulin (Ig) G and M aCl antibodies, IgG and IgM b2 glycoprotein I, lupus anticoagulant, anti-dsDNA and antinuclear antibodies.

Results: The patients included 24 females and 8 males. The most common thrombotic events were small vessel thrombosis (44%), venous thrombosis (28%) mainly deep venous thrombosis (DVT) in lower extremities, and arterial thrombosis (25%). The most common clinical non-thrombotic manifestations were hematological (53%) and neurological disorders (22%). There were no significant differences between groups with regard to the site of thrombosis, non-thrombotic clinical manifestations or laboratory features.

Conclusions: There were some important differences between the clinical manifestations of APS in children compared with adults, but we found no significant differences between patients with primary and APS associated with SLE. Larger studies in Latin American APS children are necessary to determine whether there are differences between ethnic groups.

 


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