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עמוד בית
Mon, 20.05.24

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June 2023
Yotam Bronstein MD, Dana Elhadad MD, Eyas Midlij MD, Moshe Yana MD, Daniel Yakubovich MD, Nechama Sharon MD

Background: Factor VII (FVII) deficiency is characterized by normal activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT) and prolonged prothrombin time (PT) values. It is diagnosed by determining protein level and coagulation activity (FVII:C). FVII:C measurements are expensive and time consuming.

Objectives: To analyze correlations between PT, international normalized ratio (INR), and FVII:C in pediatric patients before otolaryngology surgery and to establish alternative methods for identifying FVII deficiency.

Methods: FVII:C data were collected from 96 patients with normal aPTT and prolonged PT values during preoperative otolaryngology surgery coagulation workup between 2016 and 2020. We compared demographic and clinical parameters using Spearman correlation coefficient and receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis to determine the accuracy of PT and INR values to predict FVII deficiency.

Results: The median values of PT, INR and FVII:C were 13.5 seconds, 1.14, and 67.5%, respectively. In total, 65 participants (67.7%) displayed normal FVII:C compared to 31 (32.3%) with decreased FVII:C. A statistically significant negative correlation was observed between FVII:C and PT values and between FVII:C and INR. Despite statistically significant ROC of 0.653 for PT (P-value = 0.017, 95% confidence interval [95%CI] 0.529–0.776) and 0.669 for INR (P-value = 0.08, 95%CI 0.551–0.788), we were unable to determine an optimal cutoff point to predict FVII:C deficiency with high sensitivity and high specificity.

Conclusions: We could not identify a PT or INR threshold to best predict clinically relevant FVII:C levels. When PT is abnormal, determining FVII:C protein levels is needed for diagnosing FVII deficiency and considering surgical prophylactic treatment.

December 2022
Miri Schamroth Pravda MD, Daniel Yehuda MD, Nili Schamroth Pravda MD, Eilon Krashin MD

Background: Data regarding risk factors for superficial thrombophlebitis (STP) cases presenting to a hospital is limited.

Objectives: To investigate and stratify clinical and laboratory risk factors for STP

Methods: We conducted a retrospective case control study comparing patients presenting to the emergency department with STP and age- and gender-matched controls. We collected data on multiple risk factors and five blood indices.

Results: The study comprised 151 patients and matched controls. Patients with STP were more likely to have varicose veins (43.7% vs. 5.3%, P < 0.001), recent immobilization (14.6% vs. 1.3%, P < 0.001), obesity (36.4% vs. 18.5%, P = 0.001), a history of venous thromboembolism (VTE) or STP (27.2% vs. 0.7%, P < 0.001), and inherited thrombophilia (9.3% vs. 1.3%, P = 0.002). Following multivariate analysis, all five risk factors remained significant, with a history of VTE or STP associated with the largest risk (odds ratio [OR] 35.7), followed by immobilization (OR 22.3), varicose veins (OR 12.1), inherited thrombophilia (OR 6.1), and obesity (OR 2.7). Mean platelet volume was higher (8.5 vs 7.9 fl, P = 0.003) in STP cases.

Conclusions: A history of VTE or STP, immobilization, varicose veins, inherited thrombophilia, and obesity serve as independent clinical risk factors for STP presenting to hospital.

February 2020
Lev Freidkin MD, Uri Landes MD, Nili Schamroth Pravda MD, Dan Aravot MD, Ran Kornowski MD, Zaza Iakobishvili MD and Aviv Mager MD

Background: Post-pericardiotomy syndrome (PPS) is a major cause of pericarditis, yet data on the risk of recurrence are limited, and the impact of steroids and colchicine in this context is unknown.

Objectives: To examine the effect of prednisone and colchicine on the rate of recurrence of PPS.

Methods: Medical files of patients diagnosed with PPS were reviewed to extract demographic, echocardiographic, X-ray imaging, and follow-up data.

Results: The study comprised 132 patients (57% men), aged 27–86 years. Medical treatment included prednisone in 80 patients, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory agents in 41 patients, colchicine monotherapy in 2 patients, and no anti-inflammatory therapy in 9 patients. Fifty-nine patients were given colchicine for prevention of recurrence. The patients were followed for 5–110 months (median 64 months). Recurrent episodes occurred in 15 patients (11.4%), 10 patients had a single episode, 4 patients had two episodes, and one patient had three episodes. The rate of recurrence was lower in patients receiving colchicine compared to patients who did not (8.5% vs. 13.7%), and in patients not receiving vs. receiving prednisone (7.7% vs. 13.8%) but the differences were non-significant. Twenty-three patients died and there were no recurrence-related deaths.

Conclusions: The rate of recurrence after PPS is low and multiple recurrences are rare. The survival of patients with recurrent PPS is excellent. Prednisone pre-treatment was associated with a numerically higher rate of recurrence and colchicine treatment with a numerically lower rate, but the differences were non-significant.

January 2020
Miri Schamroth Pravda MD, Nili Schamroth Pravda MD, Yitzhak Beigel MD, Shlomi Matetzky MD and Roy Beigel MD

In this review, the authors re-examine the role of aspirin in the primary prevention of cardiovascular disease. They discuss the history of the use of aspirin in primary prevention, the current guidelines, and the recent evidence surrounding aspirin use as primary prevention in special populations such as those with moderate cardiovascular risk, diabetes mellitus, and the elderly

 

June 2019
Mark Kheifets MD, Eli Karniel MD, Daniel Landa MD, Shelly Abigail Vons MD, Katya Meridor MD and Gideon Charach MD

Background: Cannabinoid hyperemesis syndrome (CHS) is under-recognized by clinicians. It is characterized by nausea, severe abdominal pain, and cyclical vomiting in the context of chronic cannabis use. Oral benzodiazepine is a proposed treatment for CHS. It decreases activation of Cannabinoid Type 1 Receptor (CB1) in the frontal cortex, has a sedative and hypnotic effect and reduces the anticipation of nausea and vomiting. These effects on the central nervous system (CNS) might explain its beneficial antiemetic effect for this syndrome.

Objectives: To increase the index of suspicion for CHS, a unique syndrome that requires a unique treatment with benzodiazepines and not antiemetics.

Methods: We describe a series of four patients with documented cannabis use, who were admitted to an internal medicine department of Meir Medical Center due to symptoms consistent with abdominal pain, nausea, and vomiting. They were initially treated with conventional antiemetics and proton pump inhibitors without response. Intensive investigations were conducted to exclude common and sometimes urgent gastrointestinal or CNS syndromes.

Results: After excluding urgent gastrointestinal and CNS origins for the vomiting, we suspected CHS. All four patients experienced similar symptoms and failure of conventional treatment with antiemetics and proton pump inhibitors. They experienced relief after administration of benzodiazepines.

Conclusions: A high index of suspicion for CHS allows for rapid, appropriate treatment with benzodiazepines, which in turn may lead to cessation of the debilitating symptoms caused by this syndrome.

April 2017
July 2015
Smadar Eventov-Friedman MD PhD, Ayala Frumkin PhD, Benjamin Bar-Oz MD and Annick Raas-Rothschild MD
June 2015
Yacov Shacham MD, Eran Leshem-Rubinow MD, Arie Steinvil MD, Gad Keren MD, Arie Roth MD and Yaron Arbel MD

Abstract

Background: In the era of primary percutaneous coronary intervention (PPCI), information on the incidence and prognostic significance of high degree atrioventricular block (AVB) in ST elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) patients is limited.

Objectives: To assess the incidence, time of onset, predictors and prognostic significance of high degree AVB in a large cohort of consecutive STEMI patients undergoing PPCI.

Methods: We retrospectively studied 1244 consecutive STEMI patients undergoing PPCI. Patient records were reviewed for the presence of high degree AVB, its time of occurrence and relation to in-hospital complications, as well as long-term mortality over a 5 year period.

Results: High degree AVB was present in 33 patients (3.0%), in 25 (76%) of whom the conduction disorder occurred prior to PPCI. Twelve patients (36%) required temporary pacing, all prior to or during coronary intervention, and all AVB resolved spontaneously before hospital discharge. AVB was associated with a significantly higher 30 day (15 % vs. 2.0%, P = 0.001) and long-term mortality rate (30% vs. 6.0%, P < 0.001). Time of AVB had no effect on mortality. In a multivariate regression model, AVB emerged as an independent predictor for long-term mortality (hazard ratio 2.8, 95% confidence interval 1.20–6.44, P = 0.001).

Conclusions: High degree AVB remains a significant prognostic marker in STEMI patients in the PPCI era, albeit transient.

December 2014
Yael Weintraub MD, Noa Rabinowicz MD, Penny Hanuka, Michal Rothschild MD, Shulamit Kotzki and Yosef Uziel MD

Background: Intra-articular corticosteroid injection (IACI), a common procedure in juvenile idiopathic arthritis, is usually associated with anxiety and pain. In a previous study, we concluded that nitrous oxide (NO2) provides effective and safe sedation for such procedures. Following the introduction of medical clowns in our hospital, we added them as an integral part of the team performing IACI.

Objectives: To prospectively evaluate the effect of a medical clown on pain perception during intra-articular corticosteroid injection for juvenile idiopathic arthritis using NO2 conscious sedation.

Methods: Patients scheduled for IACI first met and interacted with the medical clown. During the procedure, the rheumatologist and the medical clown worked in parallel to create distraction. NO2 was administered. The patient, parent, physician, medical clown and nurse completed a visual analog scale (0–10) for pain. Change in heart rate ≥ 15% was recorded to evaluate physiologic response to pain and stress.

Results: A total of 46 procedures were performed in 32 children: 23 girls, 9 boys, with a mean age of 10.9 ± 3.6 years. The median visual analog scale pain score for the patients, parents, physicians, medical clown and nurses was 2, 2, 1, 1 and 1, respectively. Five patients had increased heart rate and experienced increased pain.

Conclusions: Active participation of a medical clown during IACI with nitrous oxide for juvenile idiopathic arthritis further decreases pain and stress and results in a positive patient experience. 

Borys A. Cornejo-Moreno MD MSc, Diego Uribe-Escamilla MD and Fabio Salamanca-Gómez MD
Breast cancer, specifically mammary carcinoma, is the most common cause of death from cancer in women worldwide, with a lifetime risk of one in nine, and its prevalence is increasing. It represents around 30% of all cancer in females and approximately 40,000 deaths in the United States per year. Important advances have been made in detection and treatment, but a significant number of breast cancers are still detected late. This summary of its epidemiology and history, the molecular aspects of detection and the main implicated genes emphasizes the etiology and heterogeneity of the disease. It is still not clear whether the remaining cases of breast cancer negative to BRCA are due to mutations in another high penetrance gene or to unknown factors yet to be discovered.
August 2014
Elon Glassberg MD MHA, Roy Nadler MD, Ari M. Lipsky MD PhD, Avi Shina MD, David Dagan MD MHA and Yitshak Kreiss MD MHA MPA
June 2014
Joshua Feinberg*, Laurel Grabowitz*, Pnina Rotman-Pikielny MD, Maya Berla MD and Yair Levy MD
December 2013
Yacov Shacham, Eran Leshem-Rubinow and Arie Roth
 Studies on trials conducted before the use of thrombolysis demonstrated both short- and long-term benefits of beta-blockers, and one meta-analysis of those trials showed a 25% reduction in 1 year mortality. Treatment with beta-blockers was and continues to be recommended for patients following ST elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI), but many patients failed to receive these agents, mostly because physicians were unconvinced of their benefit. A similar analysis of the studies in STEMI patients treated with thrombolysis also showed an overall 23% reduction in mortality associated with β-blocker use in the era of primary percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). In the present review, we examine the relationship between the pharmacology of β-blockers and their potential utility in order to review early trials on their post-infarct efficacy and to place these findings in the context of this specific patient population in the era of primary PCI.

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