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עמוד בית
Sat, 20.07.24

Search results


June 2024
Ehud Jacobzon MD, Avital Lifschitz RN, Danny Fink MD, Tal Hasin MD

Background: Left ventricular assist devices (LVAD) are a staple element in contemporary treatment of advanced heart failure. LVAD surgeries are mostly done in heart transplantations centers, as a destination therapy or as a bridge to heart transplantation.

Objectives: To describe our step-by-step experience in establishing and implementing a new LVAD program in a non-heart transplant center. To give insight to our short- and long-term results of our first 25 LVAD patients.

Methods: Preliminary steps included identifying the need for a new program and establishing the leading team. Next is defining protocols for pre-operative evaluation, operating room, post-operative management, and outpatient follow-up. The leading team needs to educate other relevant units in the hospital that will be involved in the care of these patients. It is essential to work in collaboration with a heart transplant center from the very beginning. Patient selection is of major importance especially in the early experience. Initially “low risk” patients should be enrolled.

Results: We describe our first 25 LVAD patients. Our first five patients all survived beyond 2 years, with no major complications. Overall, there was one operative death due to massive GI bleeding. There were four late deaths due to septic events.

Conclusions: Establishing a new LVAD program can be successful also with small- and medium-size programs. With careful and meticulous planning LVAD implantation can be extended to more centers thus offering an excellent solution for advanced heart failure patients.

Mahmoud Massalha MD, Sharon Reisfeld MD

Background: Gram-negative bloodstream infections (GN-BSI) are life threatening. Appropriate antimicrobial therapy and source control when indicated improve survival. Dementia is an independent risk factor for death and is associated with increased risk for infections, especially in advanced stages. Data about the best diagnostic and therapeutic approaches for patients with dementia and GN-BSI are lacking.

Objectives: To evaluate patients with dementia and GN-BSI and determine whether diagnostic imaging improves clinical outcomes.

Methods: We performed a retrospective cohort study of adult patients with GN-BSI, during 2019–2022. Patients with or without a diagnosis of dementia were compared. Outcomes were in-hospital mortality and recurrent bacteremia. Demographic, clinical, diagnostic, and therapeutic data were collected and analyzed.

Results: A total of 87 patients with dementia and 130 without were included. Patients with dementia received appropriate empirical antimicrobial therapy in 38% of cases compared to 62% of patients without dementia, P < 0.001. Imaging studies were performed in half of patients in both groups. In the dementia group, 17% had abnormal findings that required source control versus 30% in the control group (P = 0.049). Source control was performed in 15% of patients with dementia versus 28% of patients without dementia (P = 0.032). Mortality was 27.6% in the dementia group versus 22.3% in the control group (P = 0.42).

Conclusions: In patients with dementia and GN-BSI, imaging studies have lower effect on clinical outcomes. Imaging studies should be performed in selected cases only and not conducted routinely.

May 2024
Jonathan Eisenberger BSc, Shmuel Somer BSc, Eyal Nachum MD, Eilon Ram MD, Jacob Lavee MD, Leonid Sternik MD, Jeffrey Morgan MD

Background: Long-term support with a HeartMate 3 (HM3) left ventricular assist device (LVAD) has improved outcomes of patients with end-stage heart failure. However, there is a paucity of data on the outcomes of patients who underwent concomitant cardiac surgical procedure (CCSP) during HM3-LVAD implantation.

Objectives: To assess our single-center experience with patients who underwent CCSP during the implantation of an HM3-LVAD.

Methods: From December 2016 until April 2022, 131 adult patients underwent HM3-LVAD implantation. A total of 23 patients underwent CCSP during the HM3-LVAD implantation+CCSP, and 108 underwent only HM3-LVAD implantation (HM3-only).

Results: The median age was 59 ± 11 years (range 54-67), 82% (n=108) were male, and 76% (n=100) were implanted as a bridge-to-transplant. The concomitant procedures performed during the implantation included 8 aortic valve repairs/replacements, 14 tricuspid valve repairs, 4 patent foramen ovales or atrial septal defect closures, and 3 other cardiac procedures. The mean cardiopulmonary bypass time was 113 ± 58 minutes for the HM3-only group and 155 ± 47 minutes for the HM3+CCSP group (P = 0.007). The mortality rates at 30 days, 6 months, and 12 months post-implantation were 2 (9%), 5 (22%), and 6 (26%) respectively for the HM3+CCSP group, and 7 (6%), 18 (17%), and 30 (28%) for the HM3-only group (P = 0.658, 0.554, and 1.000).

Conclusions: Our experience demonstrated no significant difference in the 30-day, 6-month, and 12-month mortality rates for patients who underwent a CCSP during HM3-LVAD implantation compared to patients who did not undergo CCSP during HM3-LVAD implantation.

March 2024
Eiman Shalabna MD, Nir Haya MD, Ariel Zilberlicht MD, Rotem Sadeh MD, Yoram Abramov MD

Background: Obliterative vaginal procedures may offer lower perioperative morbidity and equal success rates as reconstructive procedures for frail and elderly women who no longer desire future coital function. The combination of vaginal hysterectomy with either reconstructive or obliterative vaginal procedures has not yet been investigated.

Objectives: To compare peri- and postoperative outcomes of vaginal hysterectomy with pelvic floor reconstruction (VHR) vs. vaginal hysterectomy with colpocleisis (VHC).

Methods: We conducted a retrospective study comparing medical and surgical data of patients undergoing either VHR or VHC between 2006 and 2015. Data were obtained from inpatient and outpatient medical records including peri- and postoperative course, as well as long-term (24 months) follow-up data.

Results: We identified 172 patients who underwent VHR and 44 who underwent VHC. Patients in the VHC group were significantly older (71.3 ± 4.5 vs. 68.6 ± 6.5 years, P = 0.01), and more likely to have medical co-morbidities (P = 0.001 and P = 0.029, respectively). Patients in the VHC group experienced shorter operative time (2.3 ± 0.58 vs. 2.7 ± 1.02 hours, P = 0.007), lower perioperative blood loss (P < 0.0001), shorter hospital stay (P < 0.0001), and lower rates of postoperative urinary retention. Long-term pelvic organ prolapse (POP) recurrence rates were significantly higher among the VHR group. Postoperative resolution of both stress urinary incontinence and overactive bladder were common in both groups.

Conclusions: VHC is associated with lower perioperative blood loss, shorter operative time, shorter hospital stay, shorter time with an indwelling catheter, and lower long-term objective POP recurrence rates.

Amram Kupietzky MD, Roi Dover MD, Ata Maden MD, Nachum Emil Eliezer Lourie MD, Ronit Grinbaum MD

Despite recent advances in the pharmacological and endoscopic treatments for obesity, bariatric surgery is still considered one of the most effective and safe treatments for morbid obesity with over 250,000 bariatric procedures performed each year in the United States. While these procedures are considered safe, they are not free of complications. It has been reported that the primary short-term major complication after Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB), one-anastomosis (Mini) gastric bypass (OAGB), or sleeve gastrectomy (SG) is gastrointestinal leakage, with a reported leak rate of 0.1–8.3%, 0–5.1%, and 0–7%, respectively [1,2]. While the etiology of gastrointestinal leakage following bariatric procedure is multifactorial, including preoperative, intraoperative, and postoperative factors, a single factor can rarely be attributed to this misfortunate complication. We describe a case of a 30-year-old woman who presented on postoperative day (POD) 10 of a OAGB with a gastrointestinal leakage after treated with a high dose of oral misoprostol.

January 2024
Karam Azem MD, Shai Fein MD MHA, Yuri Matatov MD, Philip Heesen MD, Leonid A Eidelman MD, Michael Yohay Stav MD, Yoel Shufaro MD PhD, Sharon Orbach-Zinger MD, Cristian Arzola MD MSc

Background: Pulmonary aspiration is a potentially lethal perioperative complication that can be precipitated by gastric insufflation. Face mask ventilation (FMV), a ubiquitous anesthetic procedure, can cause gastric insufflation. FMV with an inspiratory pressure of 15 cm H2O provides the best balance between adequate pulmonary ventilation and a low probability of gastric insufflation. There is no data about the effects of FMV > 120 seconds.

Objectives: To investigate the effect of prolonged FMV on gastric insufflation.

Methods: We conducted a prospective observational study at a tertiary medical center with female patients who underwent oocyte retrieval surgery under general anesthesia FMV. Pre- and postoperative gastric ultrasound examinations measured the gastric antral cross-sectional area to detect gastric insufflation. Pressure-controlled FMV with an inspiratory pressure of 15 cm H2O was continued from the anesthesia induction until the end of the surgery.

Results: The study comprised 49 patients. Baseline preoperative gastric ultrasound demonstrated optimal and good image quality. All supine measurements were feasible. The median duration of FMV was 13 minutes (interquartile range 9–18). In the postoperative period, gastric insufflation was detected in only 2 of 49 patients (4.1%). There was no association between the duration of FMV and delta gastric antral cross-sectional area (β -0.01; 95% confidence interval -0.04 to 0.01, P = 0.31).

Conclusions: Pressure-controlled FMV with an inspiratory pressure of 15 cm H2O carries a low incidence of gastric insufflations, not only as a bridge to a definitive airway but as an alternative ventilation method for relatively short procedures in selective populations.

Bassam Abboud MD, Ron Dar MD, Zakhar Bramnick MD, Moaad Farraj MD

Gastric perforation secondary to foreign body ingestion is rare. While obvious signs of acute abdomen usually lead to a prompt diagnosis by emergency department (ED) staff, this can be delayed in non-responsive or mentally disabled patients. An altered pain perception has been described in schizophrenia, as part of a complex phenomenon, which is thought to be unrelated to changes in nociceptive pathways. Cognitive impairment and negative symptoms may strongly influence the patient’s expression of pain [1].

December 2023
Moshe Salai MD, Yoram Sandhaus MD, Ahuva Golik MD, Naomi Rahimi-Levene MD, Hana Castel MD, Zachi Grossman MD, Avinoam Tzabari MD, Eitan Lunenfeld MD, Shai Ashkenazi MD, Talma Kushnir PhD

The ancient, Biblical, holy Ten Commandments were presented to humanity to serve as guidelines for relationships between individuals and the deity they worship as well as a benchmark for living in civilized communities, irrespective of religious affiliation. The commandments are also embedded in medical education taught to medical students and other health professions throughout the world. Thus, the Ten Commandments are embedded in the medical communications curriculum at Adelson School of Medicine, Ariel University, Ariel, Israel. Unfortunately, most of these commandments were desecrated during the violent, hostile, merciless, and ruthless attack inflicted by the Hamas terror organization on villages, rural communities, and cities in southern Israel on 7 October 2023. We define the Ten Commandments in terms of medical education and describe their desecration by Hamas terrorists before and during the Iron Swords war.

November 2023
Ibrahim Zvidi MD, Ram Dickman MD, Doron Boltin MBBS

Background: Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) prevalence varies according to both geographical region and ethnicity. The interplay between these two factors has been poorly studied.

Objectives: To determine the positivity rate of H. pylori infection among Jewish and Arab patients who live in a mixed urban center in Israel.

Methods: Between November 2009 and September 2014, dyspeptic patients referred to a gastroenterology clinic in Lod, Israel, were enrolled in a prospective study. For each patient, clinical and epidemiological data were collected and a noninvasive or endoscopy-based test for H. pylori was performed.

Results: A total of 429 consecutive patients (322 Jewish and 107 Arabs), mean age 45 years (range 15–91 years) were included; 130 males. Overall positivity for H. pylori was 42.4% (182/429). The positivity rate of H. pylori was 38.8% for Jews (125/322) and 53.2% for Arabs (57/107) in Lod (P < 0.01). When immigrants were excluded, the difference in H. pylori positivity did not reach statistical significance (45.0% [77/171] vs. 53.2% [57/107], P = 0.217, in Jews and Arabs, respectively).

Conclusions: H. pylori infection was more common in Arabs that Jews in the mixed city of Lod, Israel. This finding may suggest that non-environmental factors were responsible for the observed difference in H. pylori positivity.

Jonathan Eisenberger BSc, Shmuel Somer BSc, Eilon Ram MD, Eyal Nachum MD, Jonathan Frogal MD, Shany Levin MA, Jacob Lavee MD, Leonid Sternik MD, Jeffrey Morgan MD

Background: Unfractionated heparin is the preferred anticoagulant used during open heart surgeries, including left ventricular assist device (LVAD) implantation. In cases in which patients are heparin-induced thrombocytopenia positive (HIT+), the accepted practice has been to substitute heparin with bivalirudin. This practice may be associated with significant bleeding and adverse outcomes.

Objectives: To review our experience with HIT+ patients who were heparin-induced thrombocytopenia with thrombosis negative (HITT-) and who underwent HeartMate 3 LVAD implantation using heparin intraoperatively rather than bivalirudin.

Methods: From 2016 to 2022, 144 adult patients were implanted with HeartMate 3 LVAD at our center. Among them, 7 were detected as HIT+ but HITT- and therefore were prescribed intraoperatively with heparin and treated pre- and postoperatively with bivalirudin. We reviewed the preoperative, intraoperative, and postoperative characteristics as well as short-term mortality and the complication rates of these HIT+ patients.

Results: The median age of our cohort was 56 years (51–60), 71% were male (n=5), all were INTERMACS Level 1, and most were bridged to transplant (n=6, 86%). The 30-day mortality rate post-implantation was 0%. The average 24-hour chest drain postoperative output was 1502.86 ± 931.34 ml. There were no intraoperative pump thromboses, perioperative thromboses, cerebrovascular accidents, or gastrointestinal bleeding within the first 24 hours postoperative. One patient required a revision due to bleeding.

Conclusions: Intraoperative unfractionated heparin may be administered to patients who are HIT+ and HITT- while undergoing LVAD implantation. However, further investigation is required.

October 2023
Gilad Rotem MD, Amir Arami MD, Iana Leineman MD, Alon Covo MD

Psoriatic arthritis can present with significant hand and wrist deformity and dysfunction [1]. The development of newer biological therapies has resulted in higher rates of remission [2]. However, surgical intervention is still indicated in pain, disability, and severe deformation cases. The management of patients with rheumatic diseases has a controversial history, characterized by rheumatologists and hand surgeons debating the efficacy of surgical interventions. Some surgeons attribute the controversial results to “too little and too late” referral of patients from rheumatologists [3]. While the availability of new and more effective medication has changed the indications and postponed surgical intervention, it is important to remember that surgery is often more effective when used preventively in the early stages than when forced to salvage. In the following case, we present a patient with psoriatic arthritis who presented with advanced-stage debilitating hand deformity and was treated surgically.

September 2023
Alon Abraham MD, Beatrice Abramovich PhD, Tamar Banon MSc, Clara Weil MSc, Gabriel Chodick PhD, Nurit Birman MD, Yaara Fainmesser MD, Vivian E. Drory MD

Background: There is an unmet need for real-world data regarding laboratory results, co-morbidities, and medication use prior to the first symptoms of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Researchers must identify specific subpopulations at risk for developing ALS and understand pathogenic mechanisms preceding the clinical presentation of ALS as well as possible subclinical disease manifestations.

Objectives: To valuate the role of laboratory results, co-morbidities, and medication use prior to the first symptoms of patients with ALS in Israel so that specific subpopulations at risk for developing ALS can be identified and for possible subclinical disease manifestations. To understand pathogenic mechanisms preceding the clinical presentation of ALS.

Methods: At the ALS clinic at Tel Aviv Sourasky Medical Center, 259 ALS patients insured by Maccabi Healthcare Services and seen between January 1998 and December 2017 were included. Comparisons of demographics, co-morbidities, medications taken, history of trauma, and laboratory tests prior to disease onset were performed between patients and 1295 matched controls.

Results: Prior to disease presentation, ALS patients had a higher frequency of hypertension and cardiovascular disease; presented more frequently with trauma and viral infections; more frequently used analgesics, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, narcotics, antibiotics, and antiviral medications; and had higher creatine kinase levels.

Conclusions: ALS patients showed higher frequency of cardiovascular disease prior to diagnosis, as well as higher frequency of trauma, infections, and pain medication usage.

Galit Almoznino DMD MSc MHA MPH, Maayan Sherman DMD, Doron J. Aframian DMD PhD, Yaron Haviv DMD PhD

Migraine is very common headache disorder, usually starting at a young age with a higher prevalence in females. In this narrative review, we summarize the prevalence, burden, and socio-demographic characteristics of migraineurs worldwide and specifically in Israel. We searched standard electronic bibliographic databases, including MEDLINE (via PubMed), Embase, Google Scholar, and Up to Date using combinations of search terms and reviewed the articles we found. The factors reviewed included prevalence and incidence, burden, sex differences, age distribution, cognitive function, socioeconomic status, religion, country of origin, and urban vs. rural dwelling.

August 2023
Sheer Shabat MD, Ronit Grinbaum MD, Yoram Kluger MD, Haggi Mazeh MD, Zvi Ackerman MD, Orit Pappo MD, Offir Ben-Ishay MD

Background: Signet ring cell carcinoma (SRCC) is classified as an undifferentiated gastric carcinoma with poor prognosis. Early SRCCs are associated with improved prognosis.

Objectives: To describe the outcomes of incidental SRCC.

Methods: In this case series, 900 medical charts of patients with SRCC were screened to identify patients with incidental SRCC, defined as diagnosed in random, non-focal-lesion-targeted biopsies.

Results: Six patients were diagnosed with incidental SRCC and underwent gastrectomy. The final pathology of five patients revealed one or more small foci of early SRCC without lymphovascular invasion. Only one patient had no evidence of malignancy. The median follow-up after surgery was 4.2 years (50 months, range 37–90 months). No deaths or recurrences were recorded during the follow-up period. These results resemble the reported survival rate for early SRCC.

Conclusions: An aggressive surgical approach in incidental gastric SRCC patients is recommended, as they have a chance for long-term survival.

Michal M. Amitai MD, Nadin Kanaan MD, Shelly Soffer MD, Lee Alper, Noa Rozendorn MD, Daniel Jacob Harrington, Uri Kopylov MD, Adi Lahat MD, Doron Yablecovitch MD, Rami Eliakim MD, Shomron Ben-Horin MD, Eyal Klang MD

Background: Jejunal disease is associated with worse prognosis in Crohn's disease. The added value of diffusion weighted imaging for evaluating jejunal inflammation related to Crohn's Disease is scarce.

Objectives: To compare diffusion weighted imaging, video capsule endoscopy, and inflammatory biomarkers in the assessment of Crohn's disease involving the jejunum.

Methods: Crohn's disease patients in clinical remission were prospectively recruited and underwent magnetic resonance (MR)-enterography and video capsule endoscopy. C-reactive protein and fecal-calprotectin levels were obtained. MR-enterography images were evaluated for restricted diffusion, and apparent diffusion coefficient values were measured. The video capsule endoscopy-based Lewis score was calculated. Associations between diffusion weighted imaging, apparent diffusion coefficient, Lewis score, and inflammatory biomarkers were evaluated.

Results: The study included 51 patients, and 27/51 (52.9%) with video capsule endoscopies showed jejunal mucosal inflammation. Sensitivity and specificity of restricted diffusion for video capsule endoscopy mucosal inflammation were 59.3% and 37.5% for the first reader, and 66.7% and 37.5% for the second reader, respectively. Diffusion weighted imaging was not statistically associated with jejunal video capsule endoscopy inflammation (P = 0.813).

Conclusions: Diffusion weighted imaging was not an effective test for evaluation of jejunal inflammation as seen by video capsule endoscopy in patients with quiescent Crohn's disease.

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