• IMA sites
  • IMAJ services
  • IMA journals
  • Follow us
  • Alternate Text Alternate Text
עמוד בית
Fri, 23.02.24

Search results


January 2024
Yael Dreznik MD, Maya Paran MD, Efraim Bilavsky MD, Efrat Avinadav MD, Dragan Kravarusic MD

Background: The management of complicated appendicitis is inconclusive. Guidelines have not been established for the use of personalized antibiotic treatment.

Objectives: To investigate specific risk factors to consider during the initial first-choice antibiotic therapy in children with complicated appendicitis.

Methods: This study included all pediatric patients younger than 18 years of age who underwent a laparoscopic appendectomy during 2012–2022 at a single tertiary medical center.

Results: In total, 300 pediatric patients underwent laparoscopic appendectomy due to complicated appendicitis. The patients were treated with ceftriaxone + metronidazole (CM). For 57 (19%) patients, the empirical treatment was changed to tazobactam/piperacillin (TP) due to resistant bacteria or clinical deterioration. The presence of generalized peritonitis during surgery and C-reactive protein (CRP) levels above 20 mg/L at admission were identified as risk factors for changing the antibiotic regimen from CM to TP.

Conclusions: Generalized peritonitis and CRP > 20 gr/L were highly correlated with changing the antibiotic regimen to TP. For such patients, initial treatment with TP may result in clinical improvement and shorter hospitalization. 

Milena Tocut MD, Amir Tanay MD, Gisele Zandman-Goddard MD

Paraneoplastic syndromes are reported in 8–15% of patients diagnosed with cancer [1]. They are defined as syndromes that occur due to an underlying malignancy, which has yet to be diagnosed, or at the time of the diagnosis and less frequently following the diagnosis of a malignancy. Several mechanisms are involved including autocrine and paracrine mediators, hormones, peptides, cytotoxic lymphocytes, and cytokines [1,2].

November 2022
Hanan Massalha MD, Milena Tocut MD, Miguel Stein MD, Gisele Zandman-Goddard MD

Hypereosinophilia is defined as the absolute eosinophilic count of above 1500 cells/µL in the peripheral blood on two separate tests taken during one month and/or the pathological confirmation of hypereosinophilia. There are many conditions that are associated with increased eosinophil counts including: parasitic infections, drug reactions, eosinophilic granulomatosis with polyangiitis, allergic reactions, drug reaction with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms (DRESS), primary immunodeficiencies (PID), eosinophilic gastrointestinal diseases (EGID), familial hypereosinophilia, and neoplasms [1]. Molecular classification may be an adjuvant in the classification of hypereosinophilia [2]. Our patient presented with hypereosinophilia as part of a paraneoplastic syndrome.

April 2020
Osama Tanous MD, Tal Dujovny MD, Gabriel Hertzel MD, Ariel Koren MD and Carina Levin MD PhD

Background: Immune thrombocytopenia (ITP) is an autoimmune disorder of variable origin that results in bleeding and decreased platelet count. Autoimmune abnormalities have been described in patients with malignancies including non-Hodgkin's lymphoma but are rarely described in patients with Hodgkin's lymphoma.

Objectives: To describe an unusual presentation of Hodgkin's lymphoma in an unusual age and alarm pediatricians of the challenging diagnosis.  

Methods: We present two cases that highlight an unusual clinical presentation of childhood Hodgkin's lymphoma occurring at an atypical age.

Results: Over a 4-year period, two children aged 5 and 6 years were admitted for suspected ITP, both had cervical lymphadenopathy. Bone marrow examination showed no evidence of tumor or fibrosis. Biopsy of the lymph node was possible only after administration of intravenous immunoglobulins and normalization of the platelet count. Platelet counts increased after initiation of chemotherapy.

Conclusions: The identification of the clinical presentation of ITP as a possible presentation of Hodgkin's lymphoma is important to facilitate timely diagnosis and management.

January 2019
Jonathan Braun, Albert Grinshpun MD MSc, Karin Atlan MD, Sigal Sachar MD, Adi Knigen MD, Liron Yosha-Orpaz PhD, Simona Grozinsky-Glasberg MD, Tawfik Khoury MD and Dean Nachman MD
April 2018
Mahmoud Abu–Shakra MD, Devy Zisman MD, Alexandra Balbir-Gurman MD, Howard Amital MD, Yair Levy MD, Pnina Langevitz MD, Moshe Tishler MD, Yair Molad MD, Suhail Aamar MD, Itzhak Roser MD, Nina Avshovich MD, Daphna Paran MD, Tatiana Reitblat MD, Reuven Mader MD, Hillel Savin MD, Joshua Friedman MD, Nicky Lieberman MD and Sharon Ehrlich MD

Background: Chronic fatigue is common among patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), affecting quality of life. Osteoporosis is a prevalent co-morbidity in RA patients.

Objectives: To assess the effect of long-term treatment with tocilizumab on fatigue and bone mineral density (BMD) in RA patients with inadequate response to synthetic or biologic disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs. 

Methods: In this multicenter, open-label, non-controlled, single-arm study, patients ≥ 18 years of age received intravenous tocilizumab 8 mg/kg every 4 weeks for 96 weeks. The primary outcome was the change in Functional Assessment of Chronic Illness Therapy (FACIT)-Fatigue score from baseline to weeks 24, 48, 72, and 96. BMD was assessed before and 96 weeks after treatment. 

Results: The study comprised 145 patients (mean age 53.4 ± 13.4 years, 83.4% women). Of these, 88 (60.7%) completed the 2 year treatment period. The mean FACIT-Fatigue score improved consistently starting from week 4 and showed a statistically significant increase of 5.0 ± 9.7, 6.8 ± 10.5, 7.3 ± 10.9, and 7.3 ± 10.4 from baseline to weeks 24, 48, 72, and 96, respectively (P < 0.0001). Mean BMD of femoral neck and total spine remained stable. Disease activity, acute phase reactants, and composite efficacy measures decreased during the study, while hemoglobin levels increased. Adverse events and serious adverse events were as expected for the known and previously described data.

Conclusions: Tocilizumab therapy for 2 years significantly and clinically decreased fatigue. BMD remained stable and no new safety issue was reported. 

 

February 2017
Gal Ben Haim MD, Uri Manor, Sarit Appel MD, Shadan Lalezari MD, Reuma Margalit-Yehuda MD and Shmuel Steinlauf MD
July 2015
Tamar Brufman MD, Ronen Ben-Ami MD, Michal Mizrahi MD, Edna Bash MSc and Yael Paran MD

Background: Mycetoma is a chronic and destructive infection caused by either fungus or bacteria. Mycetoma has a characteristic clinical presentation of a triad of tumor-like swelling, draining sinuses, and macroscopic grains. Mycetoma infection is extremely rare in Israel; however, in view of the recent immigration from mycetoma-hyperendemic regions of Africa to Israel, physicians in Israel may encounter this infection.

Objectives: To present two cases of mycetoma caused by Madurella mycatomatis in immigrants from endemic regions in Sudan treated at our hospital, and review the current literature. 

Conclusions: Health care professionals in Israel should suspect mycetoma in patients from endemic countries who present with tumor-like swelling especially in the lower extremity. Health care workers should be able to recognize mycetoma and provide the optimal treatment before the lesion progresses to an advanced and disabling disease. 

 

February 2015
Daphna Paran MD and Yaakov Naparstek MD
In the past decade we have witnessed a dramatic change in the management of autoimmune diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis and spondyloarthropathies, due to the development of new biologic drugs designed to target key mediators in the autoimmune process. However, the development of similar target-specific drugs for the management of SLE has not been as successful. The B cell has long been considered central to the pathogenesis of SLE and has been regarded as an important target for biologic drugs. Several B cell-targeted drugs have been developed and although the mechanisms seem promising, most of the studies published to date have failed to achieve their primary endpoints, leading to an ongoing debate regarding the role of B cell therapy in SLE. The present report discusses the pros and cons of B cell-targeted therapy in SLE, reviews the clinical studies, and offers possible explanations for the discrepancies between randomized control studies and real-life experience. 

 
November 2014
Ran Stein MD, David Neufeld MD, Ivan Shwartz MD, Ilan Erez MD, Ilana Haas MD, Ada Magen MD, Elon Glassberg MD, Pavel Shmulevsky MD and Haim Paran MD FACS

Background: Discharge summaries after hospitalization provide the most reliable description and implications of the hospitalization. A concise discharge summary is crucial for maintaining continuity of care through the transition from inpatient to ambulatory care. Discharge summaries often lack information and are imprecise. Errors and insufficient recommendations regarding changes in the medical regimen may harm the patient’s health and may result in readmission.

Objectives: To evaluate a quality improvement model and training program for writing postoperative discharge summaries for three surgical procedures.

Methods: Medical records and surgical discharge summaries were reviewed and scored. Essential points for communication between surgeons and family physicians were included in automated forms. Staff was briefed twice regarding required summary contents with an interim evaluation. Changes in quality were evaluated.

Results: Summaries from 61 cholecystectomies, 42 hernioplasties and 45 colectomies were reviewed. The average quality score of all discharge summaries increased from 72.1 to 78.3 after the first intervention (P < 0.0005) to 81.0 following the second intervention. As the discharge summary’s quality improved, its length decreased significantly.

Conclusions: Discharge summaries lack important information and are too long. Developing a model for discharge summaries and instructing surgical staff regarding their contents resulted in measurable improvement. Frequent interventions and supervision are needed to maintain the quality of the surgical discharge summary.  

May 2013
E. Glassberg, D. Neufeld, I. Shwartz, I. Haas, P. Shmulewsky, A. Benov and H. Paran
 Background: Laparoscopic repair of giant diaphragmatic hernias (GDH) can be challenging, especially when partial or complete volvulus of the herniated stomach is encountered.

Objectives: To review our experience with laparoscopic repair of GDH, emphasizing preoperative investigation, technical aspects, and outcome.

Methods: We conducted a retrospective review of patients operated on for GDH who were diagnosed when at least half the stomach was found in the mediastinum at surgery. Technical aspects and surgical outcomes were evaluated.

Results: Fifty patients underwent laparoscopic GDH repair during an 8 year period. Four patients admitted with acute symptomatic volvulus of the stomach were initially treated by endoscopic decompression followed by surgery during the same admission. Two cases were converted to open surgery. Initial surgery was successful in 45 patients; 3 had an immediate recurrence, 1 was reoperated for dysphagia during the same admission, and 1 had a mediastinal abscess. During long-term follow-up, six patients required reoperation for recurrent hernias. Another four patients had asymptomatic partial herniation of the stomach. The main reason for failure was incomplete reduction of the hernia sac, especially the posterior component. No correlation was found between the type of repair and surgical failure. Most patients who did not undergo an anti-reflux procedure had postoperative reflux unrelated to their preoperative workup.

Conclusions: Laparoscopic repair of GDH is challenging, but practical and safe. It should be the treatment of choice for this potentially life-threatening condition. Careful attention to pitfalls, such as the posterior element of the sac, and routine performance of an anti-reflux procedure are crucial.

 

October 2011
T. Wolak, A. Belkin, V. Ginsburg, G. Greenberg, O. Mayzler, A. Bolotin, E. Paran and G. Szendro

Background: Percutaneous angioplasty (PTA) and stenting is an established procedure for the treatment of hypertension caused by atherosclerotic renal artery stenosis. However recently, the decision whether or not to perform this procedure has raised considerable debate.

Objectives: To examine the association between the basic clinical and radiological characteristics of candidates for renal artery PTA and the clinical outcome of the procedure in terms of improvement of blood pressure control and renal function.

Methods: We conducted a retrospective cohort study of all patients who underwent percutaneous transluminal renal artery angioplasty (PTRA) and stent implantation in a tertiary medical center during the period 2000–2007. The clinical and radiological data were extracted from the medical file of each patient. Blood pressure measurements and creatinine level were recorded before the procedure and 1 month, 6 months, 12 months and 18 months after PTRA.

Results: Thirty-two patients were included in the final statistical analysis. The mean age of the study population was 66.6 ± 8.8 years old and 75% were men. There was a significant reduction in both systolic and diastolic blood pressure 1 month after the procedure: 160.5 ± 24.7 vs. 141.8 ± 23.6 mmHg and 83.8 ± 12.9 vs. 68.8 ± 11.8 mmHg respectively (P < 0.001). The reduction in blood pressure was constant throughout the follow-up period and was evident 18 months after the procedure: 160.5 ± 24.7 vs. 135.0 ± 35.1 mmHg and 83.8 ± 12.9 vs. 71.3 ± 16.5 mmHg respectively (P < 0.001). However, no improvement in renal function was observed at any time during the follow-up period. We could not demonstrate an association between clinical or radiological features and the clinical outcome after PTRA.

Conclusions: Our findings show that PTRA[1] can be considered an effective procedure for improving blood pressure control in patients with atherosclerotic renal artery stenosis (ARAS) and resistant hypertension. This research, together with previous studies, strengthens the knowledge that the decline in glomerular filtration rate seen in many patients with ARAS is non-reversible and is not improved by PTRA.






[1] PTRA = percutaneous transluminal renal artery angioplasty


Legal Disclaimer: The information contained in this website is provided for informational purposes only, and should not be construed as legal or medical advice on any matter.
The IMA is not responsible for and expressly disclaims liability for damages of any kind arising from the use of or reliance on information contained within the site.
© All rights to information on this site are reserved and are the property of the Israeli Medical Association. Privacy policy

2 Twin Towers, 35 Jabotinsky, POB 4292, Ramat Gan 5251108 Israel