• IMA sites
  • IMAJ services
  • IMA journals
  • Follow us
  • Alternate Text Alternate Text
עמוד בית
Mon, 15.04.24

Search results


December 2022
Asaf Miller MD, Danny Epstein MD, Hanna Amouri MD

A 49-year-old woman presented to the emergency department with a 3-day history of altered mental status. The patient’s medical history was unremarkable, and she did not take medications.

October 2021
Michael Goldenshluger MD, Hen Chaushu MS, Guy Ron MD, Haya Fogel-Grinvald MHA, Shay Mandler MD, Liron Miller MBA PhD, Nir Horesh MD, Batia Segal RN MA, Uri Rimon MD, and Yoram Klein MD

Background: Extra peritoneal packing (EPP) is a quick and highly effective method to control pelvic hemorrhage.

Objectives: To determine whether EPP can be as safely and efficiently performed in the emergency department (ED) as in the operating room (OR).

Methods: Retrospective study of 29 patients who underwent EPP in the ED or OR in two trauma centers in Israel 2008–2018.

Results: Our study included 29 patients, 13 in the ED-EPP group and 16 in the OR-EPP group. The mean injury severity score (ISS) was 34.9 ± 11.8. Following EPP, hemodynamic stability was successfully achieved in 25 of 29 patients (86.2%). A raise in the mean arterial pressure (MAP) with a median of 25 mmHg (mean 30.0 ± 27.5, P < 0.001) was documented. All patients who did not achieve hemodynamic stability after EPP had multiple sources of bleeding or fatal head injury and eventually succumbed. Patients who underwent EPP in the ED showed higher change in MAP (P = 0.0458). The overall mortality rate was 27.5% (8/29) with no difference between the OR and ED-EPP. No differences were found between ED and OR-EPP in the amount of transfused blood products, surgical site infections, and length of stay in the hospital. However, patients who underwent ED-EPP were more prone to develop deep vein thrombosis (DVT): 50% (5/10) vs. 9% (1/11) in ED and OR-EPP groups respectively (P = 0.038).

Conclusions: EPP is equally effective when performed in the ED or OR with similar surgical site infection rates but higher incidence of DVT

November 2012
June 2012
M. Yulish, I. Beiran, B. Miller and J. Pikkel

Background: Corneal haze is a significant complication of photorefractive keratectomy (PRK) and laser-assisted sub-epithelial keratectomy (LASEK).

Objectives: To evaluate the effect of ascorbic acid supplementation in addition to perioperative topical mitomycin-C for the prevention of haze after LASEK.

Methods: We performed a retrospective, non-randomized case series study of two groups of 48 consecutive patients (96 myopic eyes) who had LASEK surgery. The treatment group was given ascorbic acid (vitamin C) orally 500 mg twice daily from 1 week before to 2 weeks after surgery. The control group was not offered any additional treatment. Ascorbate supplementation was the only difference in the postoperative treatment protocol between the treatment and control groups. Haze was assessed on a scale from 0 to 4 at the 1 year visit.

Results: Overall, 33.3% and 37.5% of the patients in the treatment and control groups respectively developed corneal haze. The trend of increased haze severity in the control group did not reach statistical significance.

Conclusions: Our results showed that systemic ascorbate supplementation does not have an additional effect on the prevention of haze after LASEK compared to the effect of topical mitomycin-C alone.

January 2011
A. Gover, D. Bader, M. Weinger-Abend, I. Chystiakov, E. Miller, A. Riskin, O. Hochwald, L. Beni-Adani, E. Tirosh and A. Kugelman

Background: The rate of brain abnormalities in asymptomatic term neonates varies substantially in previous studies. Some of these rates may justify general screening of healthy newborns by head ultrasound.

Objectives: To assess the incidence of intracranial abnormalities among asymptomatic term newborns with HUS[1] and to detect high-risk populations that might need such screening.

Methods: This was a prospective study in 493 term newborns who underwent HUS and a neurological evaluation during the first 3 days of life. The neurological examination results were unknown to the sonographist and the examiner was blinded to the HUS findings. The abnormal HUS findings were classified as significant or non-significant according to the current literature.

Results: Abnormal HUS was found in 11.2% of the neonates. Significant findings were noted in 3.8% of the infants. There was no association between non-structural HUS findings (hemorrhage or echogenicity) and mode of delivery. There was no relationship between any HUS abnormality and birth weight, head circumference and maternal age, ethnicity, education or morbidity. The rate of abnormal neurological, hearing or vision evaluation in infants with a significant abnormal HUS (5.2%) was comparable to the rate in infants with normal or non-significant findings on HUS (3.1%).

Conclusions: There is no indication for routine HUS screening in apparently healthy term neonates due to the relatively low incidence of significant brain abnormalities in these infants in our population.

 






[1] HUS = head ultrasound



 
November 2010
A. Bass, S. Viesgarten, E. Heldenberg; C.G. Miller
September 2010
A. Soroksky, J. Lorber, E. Klinowski, E. Ilgayev, A. Mizrachi, A. Miller, T.M. Ben Yehuda and Y. Leonov

Background: Enteral nutrition in the critically ill patient is often complicated by gastrointestinal intolerance, manifested by a large gastric residual volume. The frequency of GRV[1] assessment and the intolerant level above which feeding is stopped is controversial.

Objectives: To evaluate a novel approach to EN[2] by allowing high GRV and once-daily assessment that was correlated with the paracetamol absorption test.

Methods: We conducted a pilot prospective study in an 18 bed general intensive care unit. The study group comprised 52 consecutive critically ill mechanically ventilated patients. Enteral nutrition was started at full delivery rate. Once-daily assessment of GRV with three consecutively repeated threshold volumes of 500 ml was performed before stopping EN. The paracetamol absorption test was performed and correlated to GRV. Patients were divided into two groups: low GRV (< 500 ml), and high GRV (at least one measurement of GRV > 500 ml). Clinical outcome included maximal calories delivered, incidence of pneumonia, ICU[3] length of stay, and ICU and hospital mortality.

Results: There were 4 patients (9.5%) with ventilator-associated pneumonia in the low GRV group and 3 (30%) in the high GRV group (P = 0.12). GRV was inversely correlated to paracetamol absorption; however, neither GRV nor paracetamol absorption was associated with the development of pneumonia. Both groups had similar ICU length of stay (11.0 ± 8.2 vs. 13.8 ± 14.4 days, P = 0.41), and similar ICU (21% vs. 40%, P = 0.24) and hospital mortality (35% vs. 40%, P = 1.0).

Conclusions: In critically ill mechanically ventilated patients, allowing larger gastric residual volumes, measured once daily, enables enteral feeding with fewer interruptions which results in high calorie intake without significant complications or side effects.






[1] GRV = gastric residual volume



[2] EN = enteral nutrition



[3] ICU = intensive care unit


October 2007
D. Ergas, A. Abdul-Hai. Z. Sthoeger, B-H. Menahem and R. Miller
April 2006
E. Miller, Y. Barnea, A. Karin, D. Leshem, J. Weiss, L. Leider-Trejo and S. Schneebaum
October 2005
E. Mezer, I. Krasnits, I. Beiran, B. Miller, R. Shreiber and D. Goldsher.
February 2005
A. Barak, M. Dulitzki, O. Efrati, A. Augarten, A. Szeinberg, N. Reichert, D. Modan, B. Weiss, M. Miller, D. Katzanelson and Y. Yahav
Background: Along with the increased life expectancy in cystic fibrosis and the remarkable progress in its management and therapy, issues of female fertility and pregnancy are frequently raised. These include infertility, severity of lung disease, pancreatic insufficiency, poor nutritional status, glucose intolerance and diabetes, drug safety, and long-term maternal and neonatal outcome.

Objective: To describe the experience of our CF[1] center in the management of CF pregnant woman from 1977 to 2004.

Methods: We analyzed 27 years of records (1977–2004) of the national CF registry of all CF women who wished to conceive and became pregnant.

Results: Eight CF women (mean age 24 ± 4.5 years) who wished to conceive had 11 pregnancies and delivered 12 neonates. The pregestational results of forced expiratory volume per 1 second varied significantly among patients (59 ± 23%), yet most (10/11) stayed stable throughout the pregnancy course. Maternal deterioration in CF condition occurred in only one mother, necessitating cesarean section. In 9 of the 11 pregnancies the women were pancreatic-insufficient. Of the 11 pregnancies, 2 CF women had diabetes mellitus and 3 developed gestational diabetes. One pregnancy occurred in a mother with a transplanted lung. Of the 12 neonates, 3 were preterm and one was born with esophageal atresia. No miscarriages, terminations or neonatal mortalities occurred. Although most of the CF mothers had FEV1[2] below 55% before pregnancy, the maternal and neonatal outcome was favorable and lung function tests generally remained stable.

Conclusions: We conclude that pregnancy in CF is feasible with a positive maternal and neonatal outcome. Early participation of the CF physician in the wish of the CF woman to reproduce is required. The integration of an intensive multidisciplinary approach during pregnancy, which includes close follow-up of maternal and fetal condition by the various specialists, should ensure an optimal outcome.

_______________________

[1] CF = cystic fibrosis

[2] FEV1 = forced expiratory volume per 1 sec

December 2004
K.Y. Mumcuoglu, S. Magdassi, J. Miller, F. Ben-Ishai, G. Zentner, V. Helbin, F. Kahana and A. Ingber

Background: Head lice move easily from head to head. The lack of safe, effective repellents leads to reinfestation.

Objectives: To test the efficacy of a slow-release citronella formulation as a repellent against the head louse.

Methods: During 4 months in 2003 a randomized, placebo-controlled double-blind clinical study was conducted in four elementary schools; 103 children were treated with the test formulation and 95 with a placebo.

Results: A significant difference was observed during the second examination 2 months later, when 12.0% of the children treated with the test repellent and 50.5% of those treated with placebo were infested with lice. A significant difference was also observed at the third examination 2 months later, when 12.4% of the children treated with the test repellent and 33.7% treated with placebo were infested. Overall, there were significant differences between those treated with the repellent and those treated with the placebo (15.4% and 55.1% respectively, P < 0.0001). Side effects were observed in 4.4% of children who disliked the odor of the formulation, and an additional 1.0% who complained of a slight itching and burning sensation.

Conclusions: Use of an effective repellent could significantly lower the incidence of reinfestations, which would lower expenditure on lice control, including pediculicides, combs and products for nit removal, and the time spent on treatment and removal of the nits.

January 2004
J. Pikkel, I. Beiran, A. Ophir and B. Miller
April 2003
M. Eidelman, V. Bialik, Y. Miller and I. Kassis

Background: Puncture wounds in the feet of children present a clinical dilemma.

Objectives: To evaluate our approach, we reviewed the charts and all available images of 80 children admitted to our institution because of plantar punctures from 1988 to 1999.

Methods: The charts of 80 children were reviewed retrospectively.

Results: Three groups of patients were found: 59 with superficial cellulitis, 11 with retained foreign bodies, and 10 with osteomyelitis and/or septic arthritis. There was a significant presentation delay in patients from the second and third groups. Most common organisms were Staphylococcus aureus or Group A Streptococcus. Of the 80 children, 34 were treated surgically and 46 were treated with antibiotic therapy alone. All patients with osteomyelitis and septic arthritis were re-examined; at follow-up, all but one were asymptomatic apart from residual radiologic sequelae in four.

Conclusions: Patients with an established infection 24–36 hours after a plantar puncture should be admitted to hospital for parenteral antibiotic therapy. Delayed presentation is a significant marker for deep-seated infection. Further infection or relapse after initial improvement suggests the presence of osteomyelitis or a retained foreign body. A bone scan is advisable in all patients with suspected osteomyelitis: a positive bone scan necessitates aggressive early debridement combined with appropriate antibiotics; while negative bone scan, X-ray and exploration suggest that the infection is due to a foreign body, which can be detected by computed tomography.
 

March 2003
Legal Disclaimer: The information contained in this website is provided for informational purposes only, and should not be construed as legal or medical advice on any matter.
The IMA is not responsible for and expressly disclaims liability for damages of any kind arising from the use of or reliance on information contained within the site.
© All rights to information on this site are reserved and are the property of the Israeli Medical Association. Privacy policy

2 Twin Towers, 35 Jabotinsky, POB 4292, Ramat Gan 5251108 Israel