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עמוד בית
Mon, 17.06.24

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January 2003
M. Roif, E.B. Miller, A. Kneller and Z. Landau
November 2002
Itzchak Beiran, MD, Tamar Talmon, MD and Benjamin Miller, MD

Background: The prevalence of traumatic hyphema as well as the distribution of its severity varies between different patient populations. Treatment recommendations in the literature differ significantly among various published reports. This lack of a uniformly accepted treatment probably reflects the different characteristics of this pathology among the populations investigated and calls for a population-adjusted treatment recommendation.

Objectives: To report the characteristics and functional outcome of patients with traumatic hyphema and to discuss possible recommendations regarding the use of ε‑aminocaproic acid.

Methods: A prospective, non-randomized study was conducted among 154 consecutive patients with traumatic hyphema, including data collection of ophthalmic status at various time points, the presence or absence of secondary hemorrhage, and final visual acuity.

Results: Of the 154 eyes studied over 3½ years, nearly 90% had hyphema of grade 1 or less, 3 (3.25%) experienced rebleeding, and 2 (1.3%) – neither of which rebled – needed surgical intervention. None of the four patients who experienced final visual acuity of 6/40 or less suffered rebleeding.

Conclusion: The use of ε‑aminocaproic acid in the studied population was unjustified and routine use of e-aminocaproic acid in our patient population is probably not indicated. A treatment policy regarding e-aminocaproic acid use should be adjusted to the population being treated.

October 2002
Kosta Y. Mumcuoglu, PhD, Jacqueline Miller, PhD, Chen Zamir, MD, MPH, Gary Zentner, FRACP, Valery Helbin, MD and Arieh Ingber, MD

Background: Head louse infestations are prevalent worldwide. Over the past 20-25 years, 15-20% of all children in Israel between 4 and 13 years of age have been infested with head lice; This is mainly due to the existence of ineffective pediculicides on the market.

Objective: To examine the pediculicidal efficacy and safety of a natural remedy (”Chick-Chack") and to compare it in an open clinical study with a known pesticide spray.

Methods: The natural remedy, which contains coconut oil, anise ail and ylang ylang oil:, was applied to the hair of infested.children three times at 5 day intervals. Each treatment lasted for 15 minutes. The control pediculicide was a spray, formulation containing permethrin, malathion, piperonyl butoxide, isododecane and propellant gas, which was applied twice for 10 minutes with a 10 day interva1 between applications.

Results: Of 940 Children, aged 6-14 years, from six schools in Jerusalem who were examined for head louse infestastion,199 (21:.2÷/) were infested with lice and eggs, while 164 (17.4% ) were infested only  with nits. Altogether, 119 children were randomly treated with either the natural remedy or the control product. Treatment was successful with the natural remedy  in 60 children (92.3%) and with the control pediculicide in 59 children (92.2%). There were no significant side effects associated with either formulation.

Conclusions: The natural remedy was very effective in controlling  louse infestations under clinical conditions and caused no serious side effects.
 

October 2001
Imad Kasis, MD, Lea Lak, MD, Jakov Adler, MD, Rinat Choni, MD, Gila Shazberg, MD, Tewade-Doron Fekede, MD, Ehud Shoshani, MD, Douglas Miller, MD and Samuel Heyman, MD

Background: Following the recent drought in Ethiopia, the Jewish Agency, aided by the Israel Ministry of Foreign Affairs, launched a medical relief mission to a rural district in Ethiopia in May-August 2000.

Objectives: To present the current medical needs and deficiencies in this representative region of Central Africa, to describe the mission’s mode of operation, and to propose alternative operative modes.

Methods: We critically evaluate the current local needs and existing medical system, retrospectively analyze the mission’s work and the patients’ characteristics, and summar­ize a panel discussion of all participants and organizers regarding potential alternative operative modes.

Results: An ongoing medical disaster exists in Ethiopia, resulting from the burden of morbidity, an inadequate health budget, and insufficient medical personnel, facilities and supplies. The mission operated a mobile outreach clinic for 3 months, providing primary care to 2,500 patients at an estimated cost of $48 per patient. Frequent clinical diagnoses included gastrointestinal and respiratory tract infections, skin and ocular diseases (particularly trachoma), sexually trans­mitted diseases, AIDS, tuberculosis, intestinal parasitosis, malnutrition and malaria.

Conclusions: This type of operation is feasible but its overall impact is marginal and temporary. Potential alternative models of providing medical support under such circum­stances are outlined.
 

March 2001
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