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עמוד בית
Thu, 29.02.24

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October 2023
Rachel Shemesh MD, Tal Serlin MD, Moroz Iris MD, Vicktoria Vishnevskia-Dai MD

Uveal melanoma (UM) affects approximately six individuals per million per year in the United States, with similar rates in Mediterranean countries. Although it appears to have a low prevalence, it is the most common primary intraocular malignancy in adults. Clinically, it presents in most patients as a painless loss or distortion of vision, although it may also be accidentally discovered at routine ophthalmic examination. Associated risk factors include fair skin tone, light eye color, presence of a choroidal nevus, oculodermal melanocytosis (nevus of ota), dysplastic nevus syndrome, and germline BRCA-associated protein 1 mutations (BAP1 mutations) [1].

June 2023
Achia Nemet MD, Ofira Zloto MD, Or Segev MD, Ido Didi Fabian MD, Iris Moroz MD, Vicktoria Vishnevskia-Dai MD

The prevalence of choroidal nevi associated with choroidal neovascular membrane (CNV) is estimated to range between 0.58% and 8.6% [1]. The pathogenesis of CNV is not completely understood. Researchers have suggested that damage caused to the choroid capillaries above the nevi affects the overlying retinal pigment epithelium and triggers production of angiogenic factors that, in turn, cause the development of CNV [2,3]. Hypoxia and inflammation may be involved in the process. Data have been inconsistent with both theories [4].

April 2022
Noa Gal MD, Elena Didkovsky MD, Emmilia Hodak MD, and Batya B Davidovici MD

Background: Solid organ transplant recipients (SOTRs) are at increased risk for both skin and internal malignancies (IM). The risk of IM after the occurrence of non-melanoma skin cancer (NMSC) has been studied in the general population but very little is known about this association in SOTRs.

Objectives: To evaluate the risk of IM following a prior diagnosis of post transplantation NMSC in SOTRs.

Methods: This single center retrospective cohort study included a study population of 329 SOTRs from Rabin Medical Center who had a post-transplant diagnosis of skin malignancy, internal malignancy, or both from 2012 to 2018.

Results: In total, 135 (41.03%) SOTRs were diagnosed with IM without a preceding diagnosis of NMSC while only 42 (12.76%) patients diagnosed with IM had a preceding diagnosis of NMSC. SOTRs with a diagnosis of NMSC showed a significantly decreased risk of developing subsequent IM (hazard ratio [HR] 0.64, 95% confidence interval [95%CI] 0.44–0.94, P = 0.02) compared to those without a prior NMSC diagnosis. Liver and lung transplant patients showed a significantly decreased risk of developing subsequent IM after a diagnosis of NMSC (HR 0.09 and 0.43, respectively). When stratified by type of IM, only patients who were diagnosed with a hematological malignancy had a significantly lower risk of developing this malignancy if they had a prior NMSC (HR 0.26).

Conclusions: The findings of this study suggest a protective effect of NMSC on subsequent IM in the organ transplant population.

November 2020
Noa Sabag MD Alexander Yakobson MD and Eldad Silberstein MD

Malignant melanoma is one of the most extensively studied diseases in the last few decades. The outcome of these studies and the treatment changes that followed have dramatically altered the landscape of not only melanoma therapy, but all solid tumors. In this review we presented the recent advances of surgical and adjuvant management of patients with cutaneous malignant melanoma. This review focuses on stage III melanoma since this stage of disease requires surgical treatment as well as adjuvant therapy

December 2015
Abdulla Watad MD, Qasim Odeh MD, Nora Balint Lahat MD and Howard Amital MD MHA
November 2009
D.B. Zippel, R. Shapira , I. Kuchuk, D. Goitein, E. Winkler, M.Z. Papa and J. Schachter

Background: Patients with thick melanomas > 4 mm deep are at great risk for regional and distant metastatic disease. Historically, the appropriate management of thick melanomas has remained unclear and there is no consensus in the literature. Many have taken the nihilistic view that surgical intervention to excise regional nodal basins is not justified in light of the poor overall prognosis and risk of occult distant disease.

Objectives: To review the outcome of patients with thick node negative melanoma treated at a multidisciplinary academic center

Methods: We retrospectively reviewed a database of melanoma patients to identify patients with thick melanomas, > 4 mm, who were either clinically or sentinel node biopsy negative, staged T4N0, stage IIb or IIc. The charts of these patients were reviewed and updated, with a median follow-up of 4 years.

Results: We identified 23 patients who fit these criteria. Of these, 18 (78%) remain alive with a median follow-up of 4 years. Five patients died of metastatic disease. Of the 18 surviving patients, 14 remained with no evidence of disease after initial resection of their primary lesions. The majority of the recurrences were non-nodal.
Conclusions: The overall survival of patients in our study remains above 75%, at median follow-up of 4 years, even with thick initial index tumor depths. Most of the failures were due to hematogenous spread with lymphatic sparing. Tumor biology that may inhibit lymphatic spread could be a target of future investigation

May 2009
S. Frenkel, K. Hendler and J. Pe’er

Background: Uveal melanoma is the most common primary intraocular tumor in adults. In the last two decades the Hadassah-Hebrew University ocular oncology clinic has become a referral center for uveal melanoma patients.

Objectives: To describe the characteristics of uveal melanoma patients in Israel, their treatment modalities and outcomes during the years 1988–2007.

Methods: Data were collected from the files of uveal melanoma patients in the departments of ophthalmology and oncology in our facility. Statistical analysis was performed using JMP statistical software.

Results: Data were available for 558 patients. The annual incidence of uveal melanoma in the last 5 years was 47.2 ± 7.1 new cases per year (mean ± standard error). There were 309 women (55.4%). The age at diagnosis was 60.8 ± 16.5 years (range 5–95). Overall, 6.6%, 16.8% and 86.9% involved the iris, ciliary-body and choroid, respectively. Tumors were classified as small, medium and large (9.0%, 64.5% and 17.9%, respectively) according to the COMS grouping criteria. The most common primary treatment was brachytherapy (74%), followed by enucleation (17.9%). Local recurrence was noted in 11.1% of patients, while metastases developed in 13.3%. The 5, 10 and 15 year melanoma-related mortality rate was 11.4%, 17.0% and 23.3%, respectively. Of the overall study population 9.3% died of metastatic uveal melanoma.

Conclusions: Uveal melanoma patients in Israel have tumors with characteristics similar to those in other countries. Brachytherapy is the predominant treatment, the local recurrence rate is low, and survival is comparable to that reported in the medical literature.

May 2008
A. Bogdanov-Berezovsky, L. Rosenberg, E. Cagniano, and E. Silberstein.

Background: Skin basal and squamous cell carcinomas together account for over half of all newly diagnosed cancer cases. Frozen  section control of surgical margins is often required in the head and neck region. A paraffin permanent section does not always confirm the results of a frozen section.

Objectives: To test the diagnostic accuracy of frozen section histopathological analysis in determining the free margins of excised tumors.

Methods: This was a retrospective study of 169 cutaneous basal and squamous cell carcinomas excised with surgical margins diagnosed by frozen section and confirmed by permanent paraffin sections. The data included patients' age, gender, clinical and histopathological diagnosis, as well as characteristics of the lesions.

Results: There were 149 (88%) basal cell carcinomas and 20 (12%) squamous cell carcinomas. False negative margins were found in 19 cases (11.2%) and false positive margins in 11 cases (6.6%). We did not find any correlation between false positive or false negative margins and patients' age, gender, tumor size, tumor location, or the presence of sun-damaged skin. A significantly lower rate of false negative results was found in the residual tumor group.

Conclusions: Our findings show support the use of frozen section margin control in selected patients suffering from non-melanoma skin cancer of the head and neck.
 

October 2007
N. Nathansohn, A. Orenstein, H. Trau. A. Liran and J. Schachter

Background: Early detection of malignant melanoma of the skin is the most important factor in patient survival. Naked-eye diagnostic sensitivity and specificity are low. Patients with multiple nevi are at high risk to develop melanomas and the clinical follow-up of such patients is difficult, resulting in missed melanomas on the one hand and unnecessary biopsies on the other.

Objectives: To describe the set-up of a special clinic aimed at early detection of melanoma and follow-up of high risk patients and preliminary results from 20 months of operation.

Methods: We established a pigmented lesions clinic based on a digital photography studio enabling documentation and comparison over time of full body photography and dermoscopy.

Results: In the first 20 months of work, 895 patients were seen, 206 of them for follow-up visits. A total of 29,254 photos were taken. Altogether, 236 lesions were suspicious (either clinically or dermoscopically) and the patients were advised to excise them. Seven melanomas were found in this initial examination (which did not include long-term follow-up).

Conclusions: With multimode photographic cutaneous surveillance, early detection of melanoma in high risk patients has been reported. Our clinic utilizes the same techniques and diagnostic algorithm as other leading clinics throughout the world, thus enabling us to deliver better follow-up for those patients.
 

April 2006
E. Miller, Y. Barnea, A. Karin, D. Leshem, J. Weiss, L. Leider-Trejo and S. Schneebaum
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