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עמוד בית
Tue, 27.02.24

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September 2017
Aref Elnasasra MD, Hilmi Alnsasra MD, Rozalia Smolyakov MD, Klaris Riesenberg MD and Lior Nesher MD

Background: Little is known about the incidence of urinary tract infections (UTI) in the dispersed Bedouin population. UTIs are routinely treated empirically according to local resistance patterns, which is important when evaluating the risk factors and antibiotic resistance patterns in the Bedouin population.

Objectives: To analyze risk factors, pathogens, and antibiotic resistance patterns of UTIs in the Bedouin population compared to the general population in southern Israel. To compare data from this study to that from a previous study conducted at our center.

Methods: We prospectively followed all patients hospitalized with community acquired UTIs during a 4 month period at Soroka Medical Center. We also compared results from this study to those from a study conducted in 2000.

Results: The study comprised 223 patients: 44 Bedouin (19.7%), 179 (80.3) non-Bedouin; 158 female (70.9%), 65 male (29.1). The Bedouin were younger (51.7 vs. 71.1 years of age, P < 0.001) and had a lower Charlson Comorbidity Index (2.25 vs. 4.87, P < 0.001). Enterobacteriaceae were the most common pathogens identified, and Escherichia coli (E. coli) was the most common with 156 (70%) strains identified, followed by Klebsiella spp. with 29 (13%), Proteus spp. with 18 (8%), pseudomonas with 9 (4%), and other bacteria including enterococci with 11 (5%). The prevalence of E. coli increased significantly from 56% in 2000 to 70% in this study. We also noted an increase in community acquired extended spectrum beta lactamase (ESBL) pathogens from 4.5% in 2000 to 25.5% in the present study. No statistically significant difference was observed between the Bedouin and general populations in the causal pathogens, resistance to antibiotics, length of therapy, and readmission rate within 60 days. 

Conclusions: The Bedouin population hospitalized for UTIs is younger and presents with fewer co-morbidities. Isolated pathogens were similar to those found in the general population as was the presence of drug resistant infections. Overall, a substantial percentage of pathogens were resistant to standard first-line antibiotics, driving the need to change from empiric therapy to aminoglycoside therapy. 

 

October 2012
February 2012
L. Nesher, K. Riesenberg, L. Saidel-Odes, F. Schlaeffer and R. Smolyakov
Background: The southern region of Israel has recently experienced an influx of African refugees from the Eastern Sub-Sahara desert area. These influxes led to a significant increase in incidence of tuberculosis (TB) in that region.

Objectives: To review the data of African refugees diagnosed with TB between January 2008 and August 2010 at a tertiary care regional hospital.

Results: Twenty-five TB cases were diagnosed, 22 of which presented with pulmonary TB, 3 with  extra-pulmonary TB (EPTB), and 7 with combined pulmonary and EPTB. Only one case had concomitant human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection and multidrug-resistant TB. Fifteen patients underwent extensive radiological investigations including chest, abdominal and spine computed tomography, 1 was reviewed by magnetic resonance imaging, and 9 underwent tissue biopsy. Eighteen patients were admitted as suspected TB and 4 as suspected pneumonia or pulmonary infiltrates that could have been defined as suspected TB. All 24 HIV-negative cases were sensitive to first-line drugs for TB except one case that was resistant to streptomycin and one to rifampicin. All patients responded well to first-line therapy. The average duration of hospitalization was 8.7 days (range 1–36). Following diagnosis 23 patients were transferred to a quarantine facility.

Conclusions: We identified overutilization of medical resources and invasive procedures. For African refugees from the eastern Sub-Sahara who were HIV-negative and suspected of having TB, a sputum acid-fast smear and culture should have been the primary investigative tools before initiating treatment with four drugs (first-line), and further investigations should have been postponed and reserved for non-responders or for patients for whom the culture was negative. Physicians should maintain a high index of suspicion for EPTB in this population.
January 2011
L. Leibenson, S. Banani, A. Borer, M. Meirovitz, Y. Shemer Avni, D. Singer, F. Schlaeffer, M. Leibenson, T. Silberstein, A. Wiznitzer and K. Riesenberg

Background: Concomitant human immunodeficiency virus and human papillomavirus infection increases both HPV[1] persistence and the risk of invasive cervical cancer. An estimation of HPV prevalence among HIV[2]-positive women in Israel would contribute to improving care for this population and preventing morbidity and mortality related to cervical cancer.

Objectives: To determine the prevalence of HPV infection and cervical cytology abnormalities, and to assess the possible influence of HIV infection on HPV carriage in HIV-positive women attending the Infectious Disease Clinic at Soroka University Medical Center.

Methods: The study population included 84 HIV-seropositive women. They were examined by a gynecologist and screened for HPV genotyping, and Pap smears were obtained for cervical cytology. Demographic, behavioral, and HIV infection variables were also recorded and analyzed.

Results: Forty-nine (58.3%) of the study participants were HPV-positive; 34 of them had oncogenic genotypes. Young age (< 16 years) at first sexual intercourse was the only variable significantly associated with HPV infection (P < 0.05). Abnormal cervical cytology was present in 17 women (20.3%); 21 women were referred to colposcopy, which was abnormal in 9 (10.7%).

Conclusions: The prevalence of HPV carriage among HIV-positive woman in our study was slightly higher than published elsewhere. The prevalence of pathological cervical cytology was much higher than in the general population. An extremely high prevalence of pathological colposcopies requiring further treatment was found. Screening for HPV and premalignant changes in the uterine cervix is highly recommended in the HIV-seropositive population. We suggest that colposcopy be considered part of the routine workup in HIV-seropositive woman.






[1] HPV = human papillomavirus



[2] HIV = human immunodeficiency virus


September 2003
D. Marchaim, M. Hallak, L. Gortzak-Uzan, N. Peled, K. Riesenberg and F. Schlaeffer

Background: In southern Israel, a discrepancy between a relatively high prevalence of Group B streptococcus maternal carriage (12.3%) and a very low incidence of neonatal disease (0.1/1,000 live births) has been found despite the fact that no preventive strategy has been implemented.

Objectives: To determine the risk factors for maternal carriage in order to clarify this discrepancy and further examine the different aspects of GBS[1] in southern Israel.

Methods: Cultures for GBS were obtained from 681 healthy pregnant women and relevant demographic and obstetric data were collected. The medical records of 86 neonates born to carrier women were retrospectively examined. Statistical analysis was performed using the Pearson chi-square test.

Results: Women who were not born in Israel, particularly immigrants from the former USSR, were significantly prone to carry the pathogen compared to native Israeli women (Bedouin Arabs and Jews) (P = 0.03).

Conclusions: A high GBS transmission rate is expected among immigrants who came from areas with a high prevalence of maternal carriage to one with a low incidence of neonatal disease environment and were not subject to any preventive strategy. Clinical attention should be directed to this issue throughout Israel.






[1] GBS = Group B Streptococcus


April 2002
Rosalia Smolyakov, MD, Klaris Riesenberg, MD, Francisc Schlaeffer, MD, Abraham Borer, MD, Jacob Gilad, MD, Nechama Peled, MSc and Michael Alkan, MD
June 2001
Jacob Gilad, MD, Abraham Borer, MD, Dafna Hallel-Halevy, MD, Klaris Riesenberg, MD, Michael Alkan, MD and Francisc Schlaeffer, MD
November 1999
Klaris Riesenberg Md, Neora Pick MD, Itay Levy MD, Abraham Borer Md and Francisc Schlaeffer MD
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