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עמוד בית
Wed, 12.06.24

Original Articles

IMAJ | volume 19

Journal 9, September 2017
pages: 538-542

Ethnic Diversity and Increasing Resistance Patterns of Hospitalized Community-Acquired Urinary Tract Infections in Southern Israel: A Prospective Study

Summary

Background:

Little is known about the incidence of urinary tract infections (UTI) in the dispersed Bedouin population. UTIs are routinely treated empirically according to local resistance patterns, which is important when evaluating the risk factors and antibiotic resistance patterns in the Bedouin population.

Objectives:

To analyze risk factors, pathogens, and antibiotic resistance patterns of UTIs in the Bedouin population compared to the general population in southern Israel. To compare data from this study to that from a previous study conducted at our center.

Methods:

We prospectively followed all patients hospitalized with community acquired UTIs during a 4 month period at Soroka Medical Center. We also compared results from this study to those from a study conducted in 2000.

Results:

The study comprised 223 patients: 44 Bedouin (19.7%), 179 (80.3) non-Bedouin; 158 female (70.9%), 65 male (29.1). The Bedouin were younger (51.7 vs. 71.1 years of age, P < 0.001) and had a lower Charlson Comorbidity Index (2.25 vs. 4.87, P < 0.001). Enterobacteriaceae were the most common pathogens identified, and Escherichia coli (E. coli) was the most common with 156 (70%) strains identified, followed by Klebsiella spp. with 29 (13%), Proteus spp. with 18 (8%), pseudomonas with 9 (4%), and other bacteria including enterococci with 11 (5%). The prevalence of E. coli increased significantly from 56% in 2000 to 70% in this study. We also noted an increase in community acquired extended spectrum beta lactamase (ESBL) pathogens from 4.5% in 2000 to 25.5% in the present study. No statistically significant difference was observed between the Bedouin and general populations in the causal pathogens, resistance to antibiotics, length of therapy, and readmission rate within 60 days. 

Conclusions:

The Bedouin population hospitalized for UTIs is younger and presents with fewer co-morbidities. Isolated pathogens were similar to those found in the general population as was the presence of drug resistant infections. Overall, a substantial percentage of pathogens were resistant to standard first-line antibiotics, driving the need to change from empiric therapy to aminoglycoside therapy. 
 

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