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עמוד בית
Fri, 14.06.24

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May 2019
Hussein Sliman MD, Avinoam Shiran MD, Dallit Mannheim MD, Eyal Avraham MD, Ron Karmeli MD, Nader Khader MD, Barak Zafrir MD, Ronen Rubinshtein MD and Ronen Jaffe MD

Background: Access-site bleeding is a common complication of transfemoral transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI). Percutaneous stent-graft implantation within the femoral artery may achieve hemostasis and avert the need for more invasive surgical vascular repair; however, failure to advance a guidewire antegradely via the injured vessel may preclude stent delivery. While retrograde stent-graft delivery from the distal vasculature may potentially enable percutaneous control of bleeding, this approach has not been reported.

Objectives: To assess the feasibility of a retrograde approach for stent-graft implantation in the treatment of access-site bleeding following transfemoral TAVI.

Methods: A prospective TAVI registry was analyzed. Of 349 patients who underwent TAVI, transfemoral access was used in 332 (95%). Access-site injury requiring stent-graft implantation occurred in 56 (17%). In four patients (7%), antegrade wiring across the site of vascular injury was not possible and a retrograde approach for stent delivery was used.

Results: Distal vascular access was achieved via the superficial femoral or profunda artery. Retrograde advancement of a polymer-coated 0.035” wire to the abdominal aorta, followed by stent-graft delivery to the common femoral artery, achieved hemostasis in all cases. During a median (interquartile range) follow-up period of 198 (618) days (range 46–2455) there were no deaths and no patient required additional vascular interventions.

Conclusions: A retrograde approach for stent-graft delivery is feasible and allows percutaneous treatment of a common femoral artery injury following TAVI in patients who are not suitable for the conventional antegrade approach.

May 2017
Dallit Mannheim MD, Batla Falah MD and Ron Karmeli MD

Background: Stroke is a major cause of death in the western world, and carotid endarterectomy has been shown to be effective in treating both symptomatic and asymptomatic carotid stenosis. Carotid stenting is a relatively new form of treatment for carotid stenosis and few studies have looked specifically at asymptomatic patients.

Objectives: To retrospectively examine short- and long-term results in the treatment of asymptomatic carotid artery stenosis with surgery or stenting.

Methods: We retrospectively collected data of all patients with asymptomatic carotid stenosis treated by carotid artery stenting or carotid endarterectomy in our department from 2006–2007. The primary endpoints were stroke, myocardial infarction, or death during the periprocedural period; or any ipsilateral stroke, restenosis, or death within 4 years after the procedure.

Results: The study comprised 409 patients who were treated by either stenting or surgery. There was a low morbidity rate in both treatment groups with no significant difference in morbidity or mortality between the treatment groups in both in the short-term as well as long-term.

Conclusion: Both treatment methods have a low morbidity and mortality rate and should be considered for patients with few risk factors and a long life expectancy. Treatment method should be selected according to the patient's individual risk factors and imaging data.

August 2009
M. Kulikovsky, T.Gil, I. Mettanes, R. Karmeli and Y. Har-Shai
September 2007
O. Galili, S. Fajer, Z. Eyal and R. Karmeli

Background: In recent years there has been an increase in endovascular repair of thoracic aortic aneurysms. In cases of insufficient neck length, occlusion of left subclavian artery achieves proper sealing and is usually well tolerated. Selected cases require revascularization of the left subclavian artery, including patients after coronary bypass surgery (left internal mammary to left anterior descending) and those with arm claudication or subclavian steal syndrome.

Objectives: To evaluate the tolerability of left subclavian artery occlusion by stent graft without revascularization.

Methods: Thirty patients with thoracic aortic aneurysms underwent endovascular repair between July 2000 and November 2004. Eleven of them had occlusion of the left subclavian artery that required revascularization in two. Follow-up (average 3 years) included a) blood pressure measurements of both arms at rest, after effort and pulse palpation, and b) vertebral blood flow by duplex scan.

Results: Of nine patients with no revascularization, 8 (89%) tolerated left subclavian artery occlusion with no claudication or steal syndrome; one (11%) suffered mild claudication only after effort and required no intervention. No left radial pulses were palpated in the nine patients. Blood pressure measurements in the left arm showed an average decrease of 40%, which remained constant after induced effort in all patients and was clinically insignificant. Duplex scan demonstrated reverse flow in the left vertebral artery in 8 of 9 patients (89%) and occlusion in 1 (originating in the arch and covered by the stent graft) with no clinical symptoms.

Conclusions: Left subclavian artery occlusion by stent graft is a tolerable procedure in the long term. In most cases, the constant decrease in blood pressure remained unchanged during follow-up and had no significant adverse affects. Most patients do not require revascularization prior to the endovascular procedure.
 

March 2003
R. Eliakim and F. Karmeli

Background: Chronic nicotine administration has a dual effect on inflammatory bowel disease: augmentation of jejunitis and amelioration of colitis. We previously showed that chronic nicotine administration has divergent regional effects on small bowel and colonic mucosal mediators and blood flow.

Objective: To examine the effects of nicotine administration on cytokine levels in normal rat small bowel mucosa, colonic mucosa, and blood.

Methods: Male Sprague-Dawley rats weighing 200–250 g were given nicotine (12.5 μg/ml) that was dissolved in tap water. Rats were sacrificed on days 1, 2, 7 and 14 after nicotine initiation; blood was withdrawn, and small bowel and colon were resected, washed and weighed. Mucosal scrapings were extracted in 2 ml Krebs-Hemselest buffer for determination of interleukins-2, 6 and 10 using the Biosource International Immunoassay Kit.

Results: Nicotine decreased IL-10[1] and increased IL-6 levels in small bowel mucosa (from 3.5 ±  0.5 to 0.4 ± 0.1 pg/ml and from 1.9±0.4 to 13.6±0.4 pg/ml respectively; P < 0.05). Nicotine decreased IL-2 levels in the colon (from 15.8±3.0 to 7.9±1.0 pg/ml; P < 0.05), having no effect on IL-10 or IL-6 levels. Rats treated with nicotine had lower IL-6 and IL-2 blood levels compared to control rats.

Conclusions: Nicotine has different regional effects on small bowel and colonic cytokine mucosal levels, which might explain some of its opposite effects on small bowel and colonic inflammation.






[1] IL = interleukin


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