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עמוד בית
Tue, 25.06.24

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July 2023
Michael Goldenshluger MD, Carmel Margalit BSc, Afek Kodesh MS4, Ephraim Katz MD, David Hazzan MD, Lior Segev MD

Background: Perianal abscesses require immediate incision and drainage (I&D). However, prompt bedside drainage is controversial as it may compromise exposure and thorough anal examination.

Objectives: To examine outcomes of bedside I&D of perianal abscesses in the emergency department (ED) vs. the operating room (OR).

Methods: We conducted a retrospective review of all patients presented to the ED with a perianal abscesses between January 2018 and March 2020. Patients with Crohn’s disease, horseshoe or recurrent abscesses were excluded.

Results: The study comprised 248 patients; 151 (60.89%) underwent I&D in the OR and 97 (39.11%) in the ED. Patients elected to bedside I&D had smaller abscess sizes (P = 0.01), presented with no fever, and had lower rates of inflammatory markers. The interval time from diagnosis to intervention was significantly shorter among the bedside I&D group 2.13 ± 2.34 hours vs. 10.41 ± 8.48 hours (P < 0.001). Of patients who underwent I&D in the OR, 7.3% had synchronous fistulas, whereas none at bedside had (P = 0.007). At median follow-up of 24 months, recurrence rate of abscess and fistula formation in patients treated in the ED were 11.3% and 6.2%, respectively, vs. 19.9% and 15.23% (P = 0.023, 0.006). Fever (OR 5.71, P = 0.005) and abscess size (OR 1.7, P = 0.026) at initial presentation were risk factors for late fistula formation.

Conclusions: Bedside I&D significantly shortens waiting time and does not increase the rates of long-term complications in patients with small primary perianal abscesses.

May 2023
Haim Krespin MD, Lior Saban MD, Eran Israeli MD, Mordechai Shimonov MD, Tomer Greener MD

Pancreaticopleural fistula (PPF) is a rare complication of pancreatitis and usually constitutes a diagnostic challenge. There are many causes for recurrent and chronic pancreatitis, with the main etiology being alcohol and choledocholithiasis [1]. However, the association between pancreatic divisum (PD), a common congenital anomaly of the pancreas that is rarely symptomatic, and complications of pancreatitis is still not firmly established [2]. Furthermore, the optimal management of PPF is still uncertain due to its rarity [3]. We describe a rare case of a 45-year-old woman with recurrent pancreatitis that presented with a PPF on the background of PD, successfully managed with conservative treatment. The purpose of this report is to highlight the rare association between PPF and PD together with the excellent response to conservative therapy.

April 2020
Nir Horesh MD, Yasmin Abu-Ghanem MD, Tomer Erlich MD, Danny Rosin MD, Mordechai Gutman MD FACS, Dorit E. Zilberman MD, Jacob Ramon MD and Zohar A. Dotan MD

Background: Pancreatic injuries during nephrectomy are rare, despite the relatively close anatomic relation between the kidneys and the pancreas. The data regarding the incidence and outcome of pancreatic injuries are scarce.

Objectives: To assess the frequency and the clinical significance of pancreatic injuries during nephrectomy.

Methods: A retrospective analysis was conducted of all patients who underwent nephrectomy over a period of 30 years (1987–2016) in a large tertiary medical center. Demographic, clinical, and surgical data were collected and analyzed.

Results: A total of 1674 patients underwent nephrectomy during the study period. Of those, 553 (33%) and 294 patients (17.5%) underwent left nephrectomy and radical left nephrectomy, respectively. Among those, four patients (0.2% of the total group, 0.7% of the left nephrectomy group, and 1.36% of the radical left nephrectomy) experienced iatrogenic injuries to the pancreas. None of the injuries were recognized intraoperatively. All patients were treated with drains in an attempt to control the pancreatic leak and one patient required additional surgical interventions. Average length of stay was 65 days (range 15–190 days). Mean follow-up was 23.3 months (range 7.7–115 months).

Conclusions: Pancreatic injuries during nephrectomy are rare and carry a significant risk for postoperative morbidity.

September 2019
Johannes Hugo Decker MD PHD, Terry Desser MD and Gabriela Gayer MD
November 2018
Vered Nir MD, Michal Gur MD, Yazeed Toukan MD, Fahed Hakim MD, Arcadi Vachyan MD and Lea Bentur MD

Background: Recurrence of tracheoesophageal fistula (TEF) is reported in 8–20% patients. Factors that may influence recurrence of fistula beyond the postoperative period are not clear.

Objectives: To evaluate possible factors associated with recurrence of TEF beyond the immediate postoperative period.

Methods: A single center, retrospective comparison of patients with and without recurrence of TEF was conducted. Medical records of patients previously operated for TEF who were followed in our pediatric pulmonary institute between January 2007 and December 2016 were reviewed.

Results: The medical records of 74/77 patients previously operated for TEF were evaluated. Nine patients (12%) had a recurrence of TEF and 65 did not. These groups had similar age and gender distribution and similar prevalence of VACTERL association. In addition, they had similar length of atretic gap, rates of thoracoscopic surgery, rates of prolonged need for respiratory assistance post-surgery, and frequency of gastrointestinal symptoms. Notably, the patients who had recurrent TEF had significantly more hospitalizations for respiratory symptoms (P = 0.011) and significantly more episodes of clinical bronchiolitis per patient (P < 0.0001). In addition, the patients with recurrent TEF had significantly more episodes of positive polymerase chain reaction for viruses (P = 0.009).

Conclusions: Hospitalizations for respiratory symptoms as well as clinical and/or viral bronchiolitis are associated with recurrence of TEF. Even though cause and effect cannot be established, these patients should undergo meticulous evaluation for the possibility of recurrence of TEF.

March 2018
Leah Leibovitch MD, Iris Zohar MD, Ayala Maayan-Mazger MD, Ram Mazkereth MD, Tzipora Strauss MD and Ron Bilik MD

Background: The estimated incidence of esophageal atresia (EA) with or without tracheo-esophageal fistula (TEF) is 1:3500 live births. During childhood these patients have various co-morbidities, but the overall quality of life among adults is similar to that of the general population.

Objectives: To evaluate short- and long-term co-morbidities and quality of life among infants born with EA ± TEF at a large single medical center.

Methods: Medical records of 65 children born over a 21 year period were reviewed for short- and long-term medical data. Telephone interviews were conducted with 46 of their parents regarding medical problems and quality of life after home discharge.

Results: The main long-term co-morbidities during the first 2 years of life, 4–6 years of age, and during adolescence (12–16 years) included gastro-esophageal reflux disease (GERD) in 56.5%, 35.8%, and 18.7%, respectively; stridor in 84.8%, 45.2%, and 12.5%, respectively; hyper-reactive airway disease (HRAD) in 43.5%, 35.5%, and 36.5%, respectively; recurrent pneumonia in 43.5%, 32.3%, and 18.8%, respectively; and overall recurrent hospitalizations in 87%, 41.9%, and 25%, respectively. The quality of life was reportedly affected among 100%, 75%, and 33.3% respectively.

Conclusions: Long-term follow-up of patients with EA ± TEF indicates a high burden of co-morbidities during the first 6 years of life, with a gradual decrease in symptoms thereafter. Nevertheless, HRAD continued to impact the daily life of about one-third of the older adolescents, and GERD one-fifth. A long-term multidisciplinary follow-up should be conducted to prevent late onset complications that may affect the quality of life.

August 2015
September 2013
D. Guttman, A. Mizrachi, T. Hadar, G. Bachar, Y. Hamzani, S. Marx and J. Shvero
 Background: Voice restoration following total laryngectomy is an important part of patients’ rehabilitation and long-term quality of life.

Objectives: To evaluate the long-term outcome of indwelling voice prostheses inserted during (primary procedure) or after (secondary procedure) total laryngectomy.

Methods: The study group included 90 patients who underwent total laryngectomy and tracheoesophageal puncture (TEP) with placement of voice prosthesis at a tertiary medical center during the period 1990–2008. Background, clinical and outcome data were collected by medical file review. Findings were compared between patients in whom TEP was performed as a primary or a secondary procedure.

Results: TEP was performed as a primary procedure in 64 patients and a secondary procedure in 26. Corresponding rates of satisfactory voice rehabilitation were 84.4% and 88.5% respectively. There was no association of voice quality with either receipt of adjuvant radiation/chemoradiation or patient age. The average lifetime of the voice prosthesis was 4.2 months for primary TEP and 9.06 months for secondary TEP (p = 0.025).

Conclusions: Primary TEP provides almost immediate and satisfactory voice rehabilitation. However, it is associated with a significantly shorter average prosthesis lifetime than secondary TEP. Chemoradiotherapy and patient age do not affect voice quality with either procedure.

November 2007
May 2007
L. Kogan, P. Gilbey, A. Samet and Y. Talmon

Background: Surgery for the closure of nasal septal perforation is challenging. Numerous techniques have been described.

Objectives: To assess whether nasal septal perforations heal more consistently if a connective tissue scaffold is placed between the repaired septal flaps.

Methods: We performed closure of a septal perforation via a closed approach using oral mucosal flaps without the interposition of a connective tissue graft in seven patients.

Results: Complete perforation closure was achieved in 5 cases (83.3%). There was no significant donor site morbidity.

Conclusions: These initial results suggest that this is an effective technique for closing nasal septal perforations; it obviates the morbidity of the open approach and the added operating time and morbidity associated with the harvesting of a connective tissue graft.

 
 

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