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עמוד בית
Sun, 03.03.24

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February 2023
Lior Baraf MD, Yuval Avidor MD, Anat Bahat Dinur MD, Uri Yoel MD, Benzion Samueli MD, Ben-Zion Joshua MD, Merav Fraenkel MD

Background: Due to the high variability in malignancy rate among cytologically indeterminate thyroid nodules (Bethesda categories III–V), the American Thyroid Association recommends that each center define its own categorical cancer risk.

Objectives: To assess cancer risk in patients with cytologically indeterminate thyroid nodules who were operated at our center.

Methods: In a retrospective study, we analyzed the pathology results of all the patients whose fine needle aspiration results showed Bethesda III–V cytology and who subsequently underwent total thyroidectomy or lobectomy from December 2013 to September 2017.

Results: We analyzed 56 patients with indeterminate cytology on fine needle aspiration. Twenty-nine (52%) were defined as Bethesda III, 19 (34%) Bethesda IV, and 8 (14%) Bethesda V category. Malignancy rates were 38%, 58%, and 100% for Bethesda categories III, IV, and V, respectively. Most malignancies in Bethesda categories III and IV were follicular in origin (follicular thyroid carcinoma and follicular type papillary thyroid carcinoma), while 100% of the patients with Bethesda category V were diagnosed with classical papillary thyroid carcinoma. No correlation was found between sonographic and cytological criteria of nodules with Bethesda categories III and IV and rates of malignancy.

Conclusions: We found higher than expected rates of malignancy in indeterminate cytology. This finding reinforces the guidelines of the American Thyroid Association to establish local malignancy rates for thyroid nodules with indetermined cytology.

June 2017
Ohad Ben-Nun MD, Nir Bitterman MD, Tamar Tadmor MD, Jacob Bejar MD, Adel Shalata MD, PhD , Hadid Yarin PhD and Noam Calderon MD
June 2016
Forsan Jahshan MD, Ilana Doweck MD and Ohad Ronen MD

Background: Fine-needle aspiration cytology (FNAC) is used to provide rapid diagnostic information regarding masses of the head and neck. To achieve good results, adequate training is essential.

Objectives: To evaluate the efficacy of FNAC in the diagnosis of head and neck masses performed by residents and attending physicians.

Methods: Palpable guided FNA biopsies from 166 consecutive patients with head and neck masses, excluding thyroid, who were treated in our department between 2008 and 2010 were retrospectively reviewed. Accuracy, sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values were calculated.

Results: A total of 193 FNACs were performed in 161 patients (5 patients were excluded due to age under 18). Mean age was 57.3 years; female to male ratio was approximately 5:4. Most FNACs were performed in masses in the parotid gland (37.3%), 14.5% in the posterior neck, 19.1% in the lateral neck, 15% at level 1, and 9.3% at level 6. The median size of the masses aspirated was 2 cm. Most FNACs were performed by an experienced physician (2.5:1). About 25% of the patients required a second FNAC. Almost 70% of FNACs were diagnostic. Of these, 71.2% were of benign processes and 28.8% of malignancies.

Conclusions: An FNAC of a palpable mass in all sites of the neck, excluding the thyroid, can be done as an office procedure with reasonable results without imaging guidance. About 25% of patients will require another biopsy. The procedure is not difficult to master, as evident by the fact that there were no differences in the results of FNACs performed by an attending otolaryngologist or a resident.

 

October 2015
Nadav Sarid MD, Sigi Kay PhD, Avital Angel MD, Luba Trakhtenbrot PhD , Odelia Amit MD, Yair Herishanu MD and Chava Perry MD PhD
January 2011
L. Leibenson, S. Banani, A. Borer, M. Meirovitz, Y. Shemer Avni, D. Singer, F. Schlaeffer, M. Leibenson, T. Silberstein, A. Wiznitzer and K. Riesenberg

Background: Concomitant human immunodeficiency virus and human papillomavirus infection increases both HPV[1] persistence and the risk of invasive cervical cancer. An estimation of HPV prevalence among HIV[2]-positive women in Israel would contribute to improving care for this population and preventing morbidity and mortality related to cervical cancer.

Objectives: To determine the prevalence of HPV infection and cervical cytology abnormalities, and to assess the possible influence of HIV infection on HPV carriage in HIV-positive women attending the Infectious Disease Clinic at Soroka University Medical Center.

Methods: The study population included 84 HIV-seropositive women. They were examined by a gynecologist and screened for HPV genotyping, and Pap smears were obtained for cervical cytology. Demographic, behavioral, and HIV infection variables were also recorded and analyzed.

Results: Forty-nine (58.3%) of the study participants were HPV-positive; 34 of them had oncogenic genotypes. Young age (< 16 years) at first sexual intercourse was the only variable significantly associated with HPV infection (P < 0.05). Abnormal cervical cytology was present in 17 women (20.3%); 21 women were referred to colposcopy, which was abnormal in 9 (10.7%).

Conclusions: The prevalence of HPV carriage among HIV-positive woman in our study was slightly higher than published elsewhere. The prevalence of pathological cervical cytology was much higher than in the general population. An extremely high prevalence of pathological colposcopies requiring further treatment was found. Screening for HPV and premalignant changes in the uterine cervix is highly recommended in the HIV-seropositive population. We suggest that colposcopy be considered part of the routine workup in HIV-seropositive woman.






[1] HPV = human papillomavirus



[2] HIV = human immunodeficiency virus


March 2002
Moshe Wald, MD, Sarel Halachmi, MD, Gilad Amiel, MD, Shahar Madjar, MD, Michael Mullerad, MD, Ines Miselevitz, MD, Boaz Moskovitz, MD and Ofer Nativ, MD

Background: The bladder tumor antigen stat is a simple and fast one-step immunochromatographic assay for the detection of bladder tumor-associated antigen in urine.

Objectives: To evaluate the BTA[1] stat in non-bladder cancer patients in order to identify the categories contributing to its low specificity.

Methods: A single voided urine sample was collected from 45 patients treated in the urology clinic for conditions not related to bladder cancer. Each urine sample was examined by BTA stat test and cytology.

Results: The overall specificity of the BTA stat test was 44%, which was significantly lower than that of urine cytology, 90%. The false positive rates for BTA stat test vary among the different clinical categories, being highest in cases of urinary tract calculi (90%), and benign prostatic hypertrophy (73%). Exclusion of these categories from data analysis improved BTA stat specificity to 66%.

Conclusions: Clinical categories contributing to low BTA stat specificity can be identified, and their exclusion improves the specificity of this test.






[1] BTA = bladder tumor antigen


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