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עמוד בית
Wed, 17.07.24

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May 2022
Carmel Kasher MD, Orit Rozenberg PhD, Anna Yanovskay MD, Hana Kahanov-Edelstein, and Bibiana Chazan MD

Background: Healthcare workers (HCWs) have close interaction with confirmed or suspected coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) patients. Infection rates reported among HCWs is between 3% and 17%, and asymptomatic HCWs are a potential source of nosocomial transmission to vulnerable patients and colleagues. Universal mask use and good supply of personal protective equipment was implemented early at our institution.

Objectives: To determine the rate of infection by the serologic status of HCWs during first three COVID-19 waves, based on occupation and risk of exposure, compared to Israeli general population.

Methods: We conducted a prospective cohort study at Emek Medical Center from April 2020 to April 2021. A total of 101 HCWs volunteered to be followed at six time points by a serology test and a questionnaire.

Results: A total of 101 HCWs completed six serologic tests. All participants were seronegative at the four initial tests. The cumulative seropositivity rate for COVID-19 in HCWs was 9.9% (10/101). Only three seropositive HCWs (2.97%) were hospital-acquired.

Conclusions: Seroprevalence and seroconversion dynamics of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection in 101 HCWs during COVID-19 outbreaks at Emek Medical Center were similar to the epidemiological curve of positive polymerase chain reaction results of the Israeli population, as published by the Israeli Ministry of Health, at each time point. Universal mask use and infection control measures may have contributed to a low hospital infection rate.

July 2021
Nadav Yehoshua Schacham MD, Arkady Schwarzman MD, Adi Brom MD, Mayan Gilboa MD, Asnat Groutz MD, and Dan Justo MD

Background: Screening for asymptomatic urinary retention (AUR) in older adult men at hospital admission to the internal medicine department has never been studied.

Objectives: To assess the incidence of AUR in older adult men at hospital admission, its risk factors, and its outcome.

Methods: The study comprised 111 older adult men aged ≥ 75 years who were admitted to three internal medicine departments. All men underwent post-void residual (PVR) urine volume measurement on the morning following admission by using a portable ultrasound bladder scan. AUR was defined as a PVR urine volume of ≥ 200 ml without symptoms. Men with AUR had a follow-up phone call concerning symptoms and urinary catheter status30 days following hospitalization.

Results: Seven (6.3%) men had AUR. Relative to the 104 men without AUR, they had significantly higher prevalence of severe dependency (6/7 vs. 33/104, 85.7% vs. 31.7%, (P = 0.007), cognitive impairment (5/7 vs. 19/104, 71.4% vs. 18.3%, P = 0.005), and use of anticholinergic agents (4/7 vs. 19/104, 57.1% vs. 18.3%, P = 0.033). A urinary catheter was inserted in one man (14.3%), but it was removed later during hospitalization. No symptoms were reported and no urinary catheter was inserted following hospitalization in men with AUR.

Conclusions: AUR in older adult men at hospital admission is uncommon and has a favorable outcome. Hence, screening for AUR in all older adult men at admission is not recommended, but it may be considered in severely dependent older adult men with cognitive impairment who use anticholinergic agents

April 2018
May 2017
Dallit Mannheim MD, Batla Falah MD and Ron Karmeli MD

Background: Stroke is a major cause of death in the western world, and carotid endarterectomy has been shown to be effective in treating both symptomatic and asymptomatic carotid stenosis. Carotid stenting is a relatively new form of treatment for carotid stenosis and few studies have looked specifically at asymptomatic patients.

Objectives: To retrospectively examine short- and long-term results in the treatment of asymptomatic carotid artery stenosis with surgery or stenting.

Methods: We retrospectively collected data of all patients with asymptomatic carotid stenosis treated by carotid artery stenting or carotid endarterectomy in our department from 2006–2007. The primary endpoints were stroke, myocardial infarction, or death during the periprocedural period; or any ipsilateral stroke, restenosis, or death within 4 years after the procedure.

Results: The study comprised 409 patients who were treated by either stenting or surgery. There was a low morbidity rate in both treatment groups with no significant difference in morbidity or mortality between the treatment groups in both in the short-term as well as long-term.

Conclusion: Both treatment methods have a low morbidity and mortality rate and should be considered for patients with few risk factors and a long life expectancy. Treatment method should be selected according to the patient's individual risk factors and imaging data.

April 2017
March 2017
Efraim Aizen MD, Bela Shifrin MD, Inna Shugaev MD and Israel Potasman MD

Background: The optimal approach to the evaluation of asymptomatic bacteruria in stroke patients is uncertain. 

Objectives: To compare elderly patients after an acute stroke with and without asymptomatic bacteriuria for the development of symptomatic urinary tract infections (UTI).

Methods: We prospectively monitored patients over 65 years of age admitted to our rehabilitation hospital after an acute stroke, with and without asymptomatic bacteriuria, for the development of symptomatic UTIs. The prevalence of bacteriuria was determined by urine cultures obtained 2 and 4 weeks after admission. Patients with and without persistent bacteriuria were compared to identify variables associated with bacteriuria.

Results: Fifty-five patients were included in the study. The prevalence of asymptomatic bacteriuria at baseline was 20%. Of all 55 stroke patients, 13 (23.6%) developed a symptomatic UTI during the 30 day follow-up. Patients with stroke and asymptomatic bacteriuria at baseline had an increased risk of developing a symptomatic UTI (54.5% with asymptomatic bacteriuria vs. 15.9% without, P = 0.011). To exclude the effects of several confounders, we performed multivariate Cox regression analysis, which showed that bacteruria remained a significant covariate for symptomatic UTI (hazard ratio 2.86, 95% confidence interval 0.71–10.46, P = 0.051). When subjects who experienced symptomatic urinary infection were included, the prevalence of bacteriuria in the study cohort declined to about 45.5% by 30 days. 

Conclusion: Elderly patients with stroke and asymptomatic bacteriuria have an increased risk of developing a symptomatic UTI compared to those without asymptomatic bacteriuria during a 30 day post-stroke follow-up.

 

March 2011
G. Rubin, Z. Herscovici, Y. Laviv, S. Jackson and Z.H. Rappaport

Background: Meningiomas are frequently detected incidentally. Their natural history has not yet been established because it is difficult to predict the growth pattern. Therefore, the management, after the radiological diagnosis, is still controversial.

Objectives: To evaluate the clinical outcome and growth rate of conservatively treated meningiomas at our tertiary center, identify prognostic factors of tumor growth, and suggest guidelines based on the available data and our experience.

Methods: We reviewed the clinical records of 56 patients with 63 untreated meningiomas. Most were diagnosed incidentally. Clinical features and imaging findings at diagnosis and during follow-up were compared between growing and non-growing tumors. Potential patient- and tumor-related predictive factors for growth were analyzed.

Results: The study group included 46 women (52 meningiomas) and 10 men (11 meningiomas) aged 39–83 years. Mean tumor size was 18 ± 11 mm (range 3–70 mm) at diagnosis and 22 ± 11 mm (range 8–70 mm) at last follow-up; mean follow-up time was 65 ± 34 months (range 15–152 months). During follow-up 24 tumors (38%) grew at a rate of 4 mm per year; none became symptomatic. Only two prognostic factors were statistically significantly associated with low growth rate: older age and tumor calcifications.

Conclusions: Given our finding of a low growth incidence of meningiomas in the elderly, we support conservative management in patients aged 70 years or older. Calcifications into the meningioma are also indicative of slow growth, suggesting a conservative strategy. Surgery is recommended in younger patients in whom tumor growth occurs more often and a longer follow-up is necessary.
 

January 2011
A. Gover, D. Bader, M. Weinger-Abend, I. Chystiakov, E. Miller, A. Riskin, O. Hochwald, L. Beni-Adani, E. Tirosh and A. Kugelman

Background: The rate of brain abnormalities in asymptomatic term neonates varies substantially in previous studies. Some of these rates may justify general screening of healthy newborns by head ultrasound.

Objectives: To assess the incidence of intracranial abnormalities among asymptomatic term newborns with HUS[1] and to detect high-risk populations that might need such screening.

Methods: This was a prospective study in 493 term newborns who underwent HUS and a neurological evaluation during the first 3 days of life. The neurological examination results were unknown to the sonographist and the examiner was blinded to the HUS findings. The abnormal HUS findings were classified as significant or non-significant according to the current literature.

Results: Abnormal HUS was found in 11.2% of the neonates. Significant findings were noted in 3.8% of the infants. There was no association between non-structural HUS findings (hemorrhage or echogenicity) and mode of delivery. There was no relationship between any HUS abnormality and birth weight, head circumference and maternal age, ethnicity, education or morbidity. The rate of abnormal neurological, hearing or vision evaluation in infants with a significant abnormal HUS (5.2%) was comparable to the rate in infants with normal or non-significant findings on HUS (3.1%).

Conclusions: There is no indication for routine HUS screening in apparently healthy term neonates due to the relatively low incidence of significant brain abnormalities in these infants in our population.

 






[1] HUS = head ultrasound



 
November 2010
E. Atar, R. Kornowski and GN.. Bachar

Background: Coronary CT angiography is an accurate imaging modality; however, its main drawback is the radiation dose. A new technology, the "step and shoot," which reduces the radiation up to one-eighth, is now available.

Objectives: To assess our initial experience using the "step-and-shoot" technology for various vascular pathologies.

Methods: During a 10 month period 125 consecutive asymptomatic patients (111 men and 14 women aged 25–82, average age 54.9 years) with various clinical indications that were appropriate for step-and-shoot CCTA[1] (regular heart rate < 65 beats/minute and body weight < 115 kg) were scanned with a 64-slice multidetector computed tomography Brilliance scanner (Philips, USA). The preparation protocol for the scan was the same as for the regular coronary CTA. All examinations were interpreted by at least one experienced radiologist and one experienced interventional cardiologist. The quality of the examinations was graded from 1 (excellent imaging quality of all coronary segments) to 4 (poor quality, not diagnostic). There were 99 patients without a history of coronary intervention, 13 after coronary stent deployment (19 stents), and 3 after coronary artery bypass graft.

Results: Coronary interpretation was obtained in 122 examinations (97.6%). The imaging quality obtained was as follows: 103 patients scored 1 (82.4%), 15 scored 2 (12%), 4 scored 3 (3.2%) and 3 scored 4 (2.4%). The grades were unrelated to cardiac history or type of previous examinations. Poor image quality occurred because of sudden heart rate acceleration during the scan (one patient), movement and respiration (one patient), and arrhythmia and bad scan timing (in one). Two patients were referred to percutaneous coronary intervention based on the CCTA findings, which correlated perfectly.

Conclusions: Step-and-shoot CCTA is a reliable technique and CCTA algorithm comparable to the regular CCTA. This technique requires the lowest radiation dose, as compared to other coronary imaging modalities, that can be used for all CCTA indications based on the inclusion criteria of low (> 65 bpm) and stable heart rate.






[1] CCTA = coronary computed tomography angiography


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