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עמוד בית
Tue, 28.05.24

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April 2024
Dante Antonelli MD, Vladimir Poletaev MD, Vidal Essebag MD, Alexander Feldman MD

Inappropriate implantable cardiac defibrillator (ICD) shock due to electromagnetic interference (EMI) induced by electrocautery is a well-known theoretical association but is rarely reported [1]. We report a case of EMI induced by electrocautery causing inappropriate ICD shock, underlining that, with the use of monopolar cautery, not only the location of the surgery but also electrodispersive pad (EDP) placement may be important to avoid EMI.

June 2023
Dante Antonelli MD, Vladimir Poletaev MD, Alexander Feldman MD

Inappropriate shocks are a serious and still unresolved problem associated with implantable cardioverter defibrillators (ICDs) that have been associated with increased mortality and impairment of quality of life [1] despite advances in device safety. We report a case of electromagnetic interference (EMI) while showering that resulted in an inappropriate ICD discharge.

June 2021
Dante Antonelli MD, Alexander Feldman MD, Nahum Adam Freedberg MD, and Yoav Turgeman MD
May 2021
Alexander Feldman MD, Nahum A. Freedberg MD, Dante Antonelli MD, Ehoud Rozner MD, and Yoav Turgeman MD

Background: Patients admitted to the hospital after successful resuscitation from sudden cardiac death (SCD) are treated with therapeutic hypothermia (TH) to facilitate brain preservation. The prognostic significance of J (Osborn) waves (JOW) in the 12 leads electrocardiogram in this setting has not been elucidated as yet.

Objectives: To ascertain retrospectively the prognostic significance of JOW recorded during TH in SCD survivors.

Methods: The study comprised 55 consecutive patients who underwent TH. All patients achieved a core temperature of 33°C at the time of electrocardiogram analysis. We compared 33 patients with JOW to 22 patients without JOW. The endpoints were in-hospital, long-term all-cause mortality, and irreversible anoxic brain injury (IABI).

Results: Patients with JOW compared to patients without JOW were younger (55.1 ± 11.6 vs. 64.5 ± 11.7 years, respectively, P < 0.006), with a lower incidence of hypertension (52% vs. 86%, P < 0.007), diabetes mellitus (15% vs. 50%, P < 0.005), and congestive heart failure (15% vs. 45%, P < 0.013). In-hospital and long-term mortality were significantly higher in patients without JOW (86% vs. 21%, 91% vs. 24%, respectively, P < 0.000001). Among patients without JOW who survived hospitalization, 66.7% presented with IABI versus 7.7% of the patients with JOW (P < 0.0001). In multivariate analysis, the absence of JOW was a significant predictor for poor prognosis.

Conclusions: The absence of J (Osborn) waves on electrocardiograms obtained during TH is associated with poor prognosis among SCD survivors

November 2015
Alexander Feldman MD, Valeria Shaikis MD, Dante Antonelli MD, Nahum Adam Freedberg MD, Malka Yahalom MD DSc and Yoav Turgeman MD
October 2012
Y. Turgeman, A. Feldman, K. Suleiman, L.I. Bushari, I. Lavi and L. Bloch

Background: Understanding the mechanism and the main components involved in rheumatic mitral regurgitation (MR) associated with dominant pliable mitral stenosis (MS) may improve our ability to repair some mixed rheumatic mitral valve pathologies.

Objectives: To assess mitral valve structural components in pure mitral stenosis versus mitral stenosis associated with mild regurgitation

Methods: Using two-dimensional echocardiography, we performed mitral valve structural analysis in two groups of patients prior to balloon mitral valvuloplasty (BMV). The first group, consisting of 13 females and 2 males (mean age 39 ± 5 years), suffered from pure pliable mitral stenosis (PPMS), while the second group, with 22 females and 2 males (mean age 44 ± 5 years), had mixed mitral valve disease (MMVD) characterized by mild MR in the presence of dominant pliable MS. All echocardiographic measurements relating to the mechanism of MR were undertaken during the systolic phase.

Results: The mean Wilkins scores of the PPMS and MMVD groups were 7 ± 1 and 8 ± 1 respectively (P = 0.004). No significant differences were found between the MMVD group and the PPMS group regarding annular circumference (15.5 ± 1.4 cm vs. 15.4 ± 1.6 cm, P = 0.84), annular diameter (36 ± 4 mm vs. 38 ± 5 mm, P = 0.18), and chordae tendinae length directed to the anterior mitral leaflet (AML) (10 ± 2 mm vs. 11 ± 2 mm, P = 0.137). However, anterior vs. posterior mitral leaflet length during systole was significantly lower in the MMVD than in the PPMS group (2.2 ± 0.5 vs. 2.8 ± 0.4, P = 0.02), whereas the AML thickness at the co-aptation point was greater in the MMVD than in the PPMS group (7 ± 1 vs. 5 ± 1 mm, P = 0.0004).

Conclusions: In rheumatic valves, thickening and shortening of the AML are the main factors determining the appearance of mild MR in the presence of dominant pliable MS.

February 2003
Y. Turgeman, S. Atar, K. Suleiman, A. Feldman, L. Bloch, N. A. Freedberg, D. Antonelli, M. Jabaren and T. Rosenfeld

Background: Current clinical guidelines restrict catheterization laboratory activity without on-site surgical backup. Recent improvements in technical equipment and pharmacologic adjunctive therapy increase the safety margins of diagnostic and therapeutic cardiac catheterization.

Objective: To analyze the reasons for urgent cardiac surgery and mortality in the different phases of our laboratory’s activity in the last 11 years, and examine the impact of the new interventional and therapeutic modalities on the current need for on-site cardiac surgical backup.

Methods: We retrospectively reviewed the mortality and need for urgent cardiac surgery (up to 12 hours post-catheterization) through five phases of our laboratory’s activity: a) diagnostic (years 1989–2000), b) valvuloplasties and other non-coronary interventions (1990–2000), c) percutaneous-only balloon angioplasty (1992–1994), d) coronary stenting (1994–2000), and e) use of IIb/IIIa antagonists and thienopiridine drugs (1996–2000).

Results: Forty-eight patients (0.45%) required urgent cardiac surgery during phase 1, of whom 40 (83%) had acute coronary syndromes with left main coronary artery stenosis or the equivalent, and 8 (17%) had mechanical complications of acute myocardial infarction. Two patients died (0.02%) during diagnostic procedures. In phase 2, eight patients (2.9%) were referred for urgent cardiac surgery due to either cardiac tamponade or severe mitral regurgitation, and two patients (0.7%) died. The combined need for urgent surgery and mortality was significantly lower in phase 4 plus 5 as compared to phase 3 (3% vs. 0.85%, P = 0.006).

Conclusion: In the current era using coronary stents and potent antithrombotic drugs, after gaining experience and crossing the learning curve limits, complex cardiac therapeutic interventions can safely be performed without on-site surgical backup.
 

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