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עמוד בית
Tue, 25.06.24

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May 2014
Dorit Blickstein MD, Rima Dardik PhD, Esther Rosenthal MsC, Judith Lahav PhD, Yair Molad MD and Aida Inbal MD
Background: A 75 year old patient presenting with mucocutaneous bleeding was diagnosed with acquired thrombastheniaThe diagnosis was based on lack of platelet aggregation with adenosine diphosphate (ADP), arachidonic acid and collagen, and normal aggregation induced by ristocetin.

Objective: To study the mechanism of platelet function inhibition in a patient with acquired thrombasthenia.

Methods: Aggregation assays of platelets from the patient and healthy controls were performed. In addition, anti-glycoprotein (GP) IIbIIIa antibodies binding to normal platelets in the presence or absence of the patient’s serum was studied by flow cytometry.

Results: Aggregation of normal platelets in the presence of patient's plasma was inhibited four- and 2.5-fold in the presence of ADP and arachidonic acid respectively, while collagen-induced aggregation was completely abolished. Ristocetin-induced aggregation was normal. The patient's serum inhibited binding of commercial anti-glycoprotein IIbIIIa antibodies to normal platelets twofold by flow cytometry. Treatment with anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody (rituximab) normalized the patient's platelet aggregation.

Conclusions: These results suggest that the patient developed inhibitory anti-GPIIbIIIa autoantibodies that caused acquired thrombasthenia. 

January 2014
Bezalel Podolak, Dorit Blickstein, Aida Inbal, Sigal Eizner, Ruth Rahamimov, Alexander Yussim and Eytan Mor
July 2011
G.Y. Stein, D. Blickstein, J. Orlin, G. Sarig and A. Inbal
 

Acquired thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP) is an uncommon disease in adults, characterized by fever, neurological manifestations, microangiopathic hemolytic anemia, thrombocytopenia, renal dysfunction, and the presence of antibodies against the enzyme ADAMTS13. Treatment with plasmapheresis has increased the survival from 10% to more than 90%. Still, there is a subset of patients with resistant TTP who fail to respond to plasmapheresis or remain dependent on this procedure. There is mounting evidence that rituximab may play an important role in remission induction of resistant/relapsing TTP; however, the extent of the remission is unknown. We present here four patients with chronic-relapsing TTP who responded favorably to rituximab. All four patients achieved prolonged remission of 23 to 82 months after the treatment.  One patient relapsed 6 years after the initial treatment with rituximab and re-entered remission following retreatment.

 

June 2002
Nurit Rosenberg, PhD, Ariella Zivelin, PhD, Angela Chetrit, PhD, Rima Dardik, PhD, Nurit Kornbrot, MSc, Dov Freimark, MD and Aida Inbal, MD

Background: Platelet adhesion and aggregation are mediated by specific platelet membrane glycoproteins GPIa/IIa, GPIba, and GPIIb/IIIa, and are essential steps in thrombus formation and development of acute myocardial infarction.

Objective: To evaluate the risks exerted by each of the following polymorphisms: HPA-1a/b in GPIIIa; 807C/T in GPIa; and HPA-2a/b, VNTR and Kozak C/T in GPIba in young males with AMI[1]..

Methods: We conducted a case-control study of 100 young males with first AMI before the age of 53 and 119 healthy controls of similar age. All subjects were tested for the above polymorphisms.

Results: The allele frequencies of each of the platelet polymorphism were not significantly different between the young men with AMI and the controls. Smoking alone was associated with a 9.97-fold risk, and the presence of at least one metabolic risk factor resulted in a 2.57-fold risk of AMI.

Conclusion: These results indicate that platelet glycoproteins polymorphisms are not an independent risk factor for AMI.






[1] AMI = acute myocardial infarction


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