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עמוד בית
Sat, 20.04.24

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January 2008
G. Zandman-Goddard and Y. Shoenfeld
 

Controlling iron/oxygen chemistry in biology depends on multiple genes, regulatory messenger RNA structures, signaling pathways and protein catalysts. Ferritin synthesis is regulated by cytokines (tumor necrosis factor-alpha and interleukin-1α) at various levels (transcriptional, post-transcriptional, translational) during development, cellular differentiation, proliferation and inflammation. The cellular response by cytokines to infection stimulates the expression of ferritin genes. The immunological actions of ferritin include binding to T lymphocytes, suppression of the delayed-type hypersensitivity, suppression of antibody production by B lymphocytes, and decreased phagocytosis of granulocytes. Thyroid hormone, insulin and insulin growth factor-1 are involved in the regulation of ferritin at the mRNA level. Ferritin and iron homeostasis are implicated in the pathogenesis of many disorders, including diseases involved in iron acquisition, transport and storage (primary hemochromatosis) as well as in atherosclerosis, Parkinson's disease, Alzheimer disease, and restless leg syndrome. Mutations in the ferritin gene cause the hereditary hyperferritinemia-cataract syndrome and neuroferritinopathy. Hyperferritinemia is associated with inflammation, infections and malignancies, and in systemic lupus erythematosus correlates with disease activity. Some evidence points to the importance of hyperferritinemia in dermatomyositis and multiple sclerosis, but further mechanistic investigations are warranted.

October 2007
April 2007
M. Shechter, I. Marai, S. Marai, Y. Sherer, B-A. Sela, M. S. Feinberg, A. Rubinstein and Y. Shoenfeld

Background: Endothelial dysfunction is recognized as a major factor in the development of atherosclerosis and it has a prognostic value.

Objectives: To detect the long-term association of peripheral vascular endothelial function and clinical outcome in healthy subjects and patients with cardiovascular disease.

Methods: We prospectively assessed brachial artery flow-mediated dilation in 110 consecutive subjects (46 CVD[1] patients and 64 healthy controls), mean age 57 ± 11 years; 68 were men. After an overnight fast and discontinuation of all medications for ≥ 12 hours, percent improvement in FMD and nitroglycerin-mediated vasodilatation were assessed using high resolution ultrasound.

Results: %FMD[2] but not %NTG[3] was significantly lower in CVD patients (9.5 ± 8.0% vs. 13.5 ± 8.0%, P = 0.012) compared to healthy controls (13.4 ± 8.0% vs. 16.7 ± 11.0%, P = 0.084; respectively). In addition, an inverse correlation between %FMD and the number of traditional CVD risk factors was found among all study participants (r = -0.23, P = 0.015) and healthy controls (r = -0.23, P = 0.036). In a mean follow-up of 15 ± 2 months, the composite CVD endpoints (all-cause mortality, myocardial infarction, hospitalization for heart failure or angina pectoris, stroke, coronary artery bypass grafting and percutaneous coronary interventions) were significantly more common in subjects with FMD < 6% compared to subjects with FMD > 6% (33.3% vs. 12.1%, P < 0.03, respectively).
Conclusions: Thus, brachial artery %FMD provides important prognostic information in addition to that derived from traditional risk factor assessment







[1] CVD = cardiovascular disease



[2] %FMD = percent improvement in flow-mediated dilation



[3] %NTG = percent improvement in nitroglycerin-mediated vasodilatation


December 2006
E. Zimlichman, M. Szyper-Kravitz, U. Katz and Y. Shoenfeld
August 2006
E. Reinstein and Y. Shoenfeld
May 2006
T. Arazi-Kleinman, D. Shepshelovich and Y. Shoenfeld
March 2006
T. Berlin, A. Lubina, Y. Levy and Y. Shoenfeld
December 2005
O. Shovman, Y. Sherer, R. Gerli, B. Gilbourd, F. Luccioli, E. Bartoloni, F. F. D. Monache, Y. Shoenfeld.

Background: Heat shock proteins are highly conserved immunodominant antigens found in various species. Humoral immune responses to mycobacterial HSP65[1] and human HSP60 have been established in a number of human autoimmune diseases.

Objective: To assess the prevalence of antibodies to HSP60 kDa and HSP65 kDa in patients with Sjogren's syndrome as compared to normal subjects.

Methods: Thirty-seven patients with SS[2] were compared with normal controls. The antibodies against human HSP60 were measured by the Anti-Human (IgG/IgM) HSP60 ELISA kit. IgGs[3] and IgMs to mycobacterial HSP65 were determined using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay with mycobacterial recombinant HSP65 antigens.

Results: The levels of both anti-HSP60 and -HSP65 were lower among patients compared with controls. IgG autoantibodies to HSP60 were significantly different between groups: 162 ± 55.1 ng/ml in controls versus 112.3 ± 30.6 ng/ml in SS patients (P < 0.001). The levels among controls of anti-HSP65 IgM isotype were also significantly higher than among patients: 111.6 ± 33.4 U/ml versus 96.1 ± 8.9 U/ml (P = 0.01).

Conclusions: The results of the present study show that the levels of different isotypes of anti- HSP60 and HSP65 antibodies were lower in patients with SS than in normal subjects. Additional studies on larger patient populations are required to evaluate the prevalence of these autoantibodies in SS patients.

 






[1] HSP = heat shock protein

[2] SS = Sjogren's syndrome



[3] Ig = immunoglobulin


October 2005
E. Zimlichman, A. Lahad, A. Aron-Maor, A. Kanevsky and Y. Shoenfeld.
 Background: As complementary and alternative medicine is gaining popularity among health consumers, diagnostic screening tools based on neuroreflexology are also being developed. These techniques, which are based on the rationale that measurement of electrical impedance of specific dermatomes reflects corresponding internal organ pathologies, have not yet been the subject of conventional scientific research.

Objectives: To determine the effectiveness of a neuroreflexology-based screening test, specifically the Medex device (Medex Screen Ltd.), for diagnosing patients undergoing conventional internal organ assessment, in a hospital setting.

Methods: Patients admitted to an internal medicine department, who met the inclusion criteria and agreed to participate, underwent conventional medical evaluation that included past medical history and physical examination. Another examination was conducted by a second physician using the Medex device to determine internal organ pathologies. A third researcher compared the actual “conventional” diagnosis with the Medex device output using standard statistical analysis.   

Results: Overall, 150 patients participated in the study. Correlation was significant for all categories (P < 0.01) except for blood and lymphatic disease. A high sensitivity (>70%) was measured for cardiovascular, respiratory, gastrointestinal and genitourinary diseases. The highest measure of agreement, as represented by the Cohen-Kappa factor, was found for respiratory disease (0.57).

Conclusions: Although the exact mechanism is not entirely clear, measurement of electroskin impedance of dermal-visceral zones has the potential to serve as a screening tool for inner organ pathologies. Further research should be conducted to create more evidence to support or dispute the use of this technique as a reliable diagnostic tool.

October 2004
Y. Levy, O. Shovman, C. Granit, D. Luria, O. Gurevitz, D. Bar-Lev, M. Eldar, Y. Shoenfeld and M. Glikson

Background: The appearance of pericarditis following insertion of a permanent pacemaker is not widely acknowledged in the literature.

Objectives: To describe our experience with pericarditis following 395 permanent pacemaker implantations over 2 years.

Methods: We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of 395 consecutive patients in whom new pacing systems or pacemaker leads had been implanted over a 2 year period. We searched the records for pericarditis that developed within 1 month after pacemaker implantation according to the ICD-9 code. The incidence, clinical picture, response to treatment and relationship to lead design and location were studied.

Results: Eight cases (2%) of pericarditis following implantation were detected. Clinical manifestations in all patients were similar to those of post-pericardiotomy syndrome and included chest pain (n=7), friction rub (n=1), fever (n=2), fatigue (n=2), pleural effusion (n=2), new atrial fibrillation (n=2), elevated erythrocyte sedimentation rate (n=4) and echcardiographic evidence of pericardial effusion (n=8). All affected patients had undergone active fixation (screw-in) lead implantation in the atrial position. The incidence of pericarditis with screw-in atrial leads was 3% compared to 0% in other cases (P < 0.05).

Conclusions: Pericarditis is not uncommon following pacemaker implantation with active fixation atrial leads. Special attention should be paid to identifying pericardial complications following pacemaker implantation, especially when anticoagulant therapy is resumed or initiated. The use of passive fixation leads is likely to reduce the incidence of pericarditis but this issue should be further investigated.

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