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עמוד בית
Sun, 21.04.24

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April 2023
Sorin Daniel Iordache MD, Tal Frenkel Rutenberg MD, Yaakov Pizem B PT, Arnon Ravid B PT, Ori Firsteter B PT

Background: Physiotherapy can help treat of trigger fingers (TF).

Objectives: To compare efficacy of fascial manipulation (FM) and traditional physiotherapy (TP) techniques in treatment of TF.

Methods: Nineteen patients were randomized in the FM group and 15 in the TP group. All patients underwent eight physiotherapy sessions. The Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder, and Hand (QuickDASH) and visual analogue scale (VAS) scores, staging of stenosing tenosynovitis (SST) classification, triggering frequency, grip and pinch strength were recorded before and after treatment. We surveyed participants at 6 months for recurrence, further treatment, and the VAS and QuickDASH scores. The primary outcome measure was reduction in QuickDASH and VAS scores.

Results: Both FM and TF improved the QuickDASH and VAS scores at 6 months follow-up, without a significant difference. The QuickDASH score in the FM group improved from 28.4 ± 17.1 to 12.7 ± 16.3; TF scores improved from 27 ± 16.7 to 18.8 ± 29.4 (P = 0.001). The VAS score improved from 5.7 ± 2.1 to 1.2 ± 2.1 and from 4.8 ± 1.8 to 2 ± 2.6 for both groups, respectively (P < 0.001). SST and grip strength also improved following treatment, regardless of modality. At 6 months, four patients (22%) with an SST score of 1, three (30%) with a score of 2, and two (40%) with a score of 3A underwent additional treatment.

Conclusions: Both FM and TP techniques are effective for the treatment of TF and should be considered for patients who present with SST scores of 1 or 2.

August 2021
Shai Shemesh MD, Alex Bebin MD, Nadav Niego MD, and Tal Frenkel Rutenberg MD

Background: Hip fractures in elderly patients are a major cause of morbidity and mortality. Variability in length of hospital stay (LOS) was evident in this population. The coronavirus disease-2019 (COVID-19) pandemic led to prompt discharge of effected patients in order to reduce contagion risk. LOS and discharge destination in COVID-19 negative patients has not been studied.

Objectives: To evaluate the LOS and discharge destination during the COVID-19 outbreak and compare it with a similar cohort in preceding years.

Methods: A retrospective study was conducted comparing a total of 182 consecutive fragility hip fracture patients operated on during the first COVID-19 outbreak to patients operated on in 2 preceding years. Data regarding demographic, co-morbidities, surgical management, hospitalization, as well as surgical and medical complications were retrieved from electronic charts.

Results: During the pandemic 67 fragility hip fracture patients were admitted (COVID group); 55 and 60 patients were admitted during the same time periods in 2017 and 2018, respectively (control groups). All groups were of similar age and gender. Patients in the COVID group had significantly shorter LOS (7.2 ± 3.3 vs. 8.9 ± 4.9 days, P = 0.008) and waiting time for a rehabilitation facility (7.2 ± 3.1 vs. 9.3 ± 4.9 days, P = 0.003), but greater prevalence of delirium (17.9% vs. 7% of patients, P = 0.028). In hospital mortality did not differ among groups.

Conclusions: LOS and time to rehabilitation were significantly shorter in the COVID group. Delirium was more common in this group, possibly due to negative effects of social distancing.

Tal Frenkel Rutenberg MD, Shai Shemesh MD, Ran Rutenberg MD, Snir Heller MD, Barak Haviv MD, and Alon Burg MD

Background: Flexible flatfoot (FF) is a common foot deformity that can often consist of foot pain. Surgical treatment is designed to lengthen the lateral column.

Objectives: To resolve whether radiographic standing feet measurements of normo-plantigrade feet and FF, symptomatic or not, differ and to determine whether the lateral column is shorter.

Methods: The study comprised 72 patients (127 feet) consecutive patients, 18 years of age and older, who were divided into three groups: normal feet (56), asymptomatic FF (29), and symptomatic FF (42). All patients had a standing anterior posterior (AP) and lateral radiographs. AP images were used for the measurement of the talocalcaneal angle, talar-1st metatarsal angle, and talonavicular coverage. Lateral X-rays were used to estimate the talocalcaneal angle, talar-1st metatarsal angle, calcaneal pitch, naviculocuboid overlap, and column ratio.

Results: All three of the AP radiograph measurements differed among groups, and higher values were measured in the symptomatic FF group. Post hoc analysis found that the talonavicular coverage and the talocalcaneal angles also differed between symptomatic and asymptomatic FF patients. While some lateral measurements differed within groups, only the lateral talar-1st metatarsal angle distinguished between asymptomatic and symptomatic patients. The lateral column length was not found to be shorter among FF patients, weather symptomatic or not.

Conclusions: Only the talonavicular coverage, the AP talocalcaneal, and the lateral talar-1st metatarsal angles were found to differ between asymptomatic and symptomatic FF patients. The lateral column was not found to be shorter

May 2021
Sorin Daniel Iordache MD, Albert Gorski MD, Marwa Nahas MSc (OT) MHA, Lior Feintuch MD, Nimrod Rahamimov MD, and Tal Frenkel Rutenberg MD

Background: The collapse of the Syrian healthcare system during the civil war led numerous citizens to cross the Syrian–Israeli border to seek medical care.

Objectives: To describe the epidemiology of peripheral nerve injuries (PNIs) sustained in war, their management, and short-term outcomes.

Methods: A retrospective case series study was conducted on 45 consecutive patients aged 25.7 ± 9.3 years. These patients were referred to the hand surgery unit of the department of orthopedic surgery and traumatology at Galilee Medical Center between December 2014 and June 2018. Median time between injury and presentation was 60 days. Injury pattern, additional injuries, surgical findings and management, complications, and length of hospital stay were extracted from medical records.

Results: Most injuries were blast (55.6%) followed by gunshot injuries (37.8%). There were 9 brachial plexus injuries, 9 sciatic nerve injuries, and 38 PNIs distal to the plexus: specifically 20 ulnar, 11 median, and 7 radial nerve injuries. In the latter group, neurotmesis or axonotmesis was found in 29 nerves. Coaptation was possible in 21 nerves necessitating cable grafting in 19. A tendon transfer was performed for 13 peripheral nerves, occasionally supplementing the nerve repair. The patients returned to their country after discharge, average follow-up was 53.6 ± 49.6 days.

Conclusions: For nerve injuries sustained in war, early surgical treatment and providing adequate soft tissue conditions is recommended. Tendon transfers are useful to regain early function.

August 2019
Tal Frenkel Rutenberg MD, Yuval Baruch MD, Nissim Ohana MD, Hanna Bernstine MD, Amir Amitai MD, Nir Cohen MD, Liran Domachevsky MD and Shai Shemesh MD

Background: Implant-related spinal infections are a surgical complication associated with high morbidity. Due to infection, hardware removal may be necessary, which could lead to pseudarthrosis and the loss of stability and alignment.

Objectives: To evaluate the accuracy and diagnostic value of 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron-emission tomography/computed tomography (18F-FDG PET/CT) in the workup of patients with suspected implant-related infections of the spine and to assess the clinical impact of PET/CT results on the management of these infections.

Methods: The study included nine consecutive patients with a history of spinal surgery who underwent PET/CT for evaluation of suspected spinal implant related infection. All imaging studies were performed between January 2011 and December 2013. All 18F-FDG PET/CT scans were performed on an 8 slice PET/CT following an 18F-FDG injection. Images were scored both visually and semi-quantitatively by a radiology expert. Results were compared to additional imaging studies when available, which were correlated to clinical and bacteriological findings allowing calculation of sensitivity, specificity and accuracy.

Results: Among the patients, five experienced hardware-related spinal infection. 18F-FDG PET/CT sensitivity was 80%, specificity 100%, and accuracy 88.9%. One scan produced a false negative; however, a second PET/CT scan revealed an infection.

Conclusions: PET/CT was found to be valuable for the diagnosis of postoperative hardware-related spinal infection, especially when other imaging modalities were uninformative or inconclusive. As such, PET/CT could be useful for management of infection treatment.

March 2018
Narin N. Carmel-Neiderman MD, Idan Goren MD, Yishay Wasserstrum MD, Tal Frenkel Rutenberg MD, Irina Barbarova MD, Avigal Rapoport MD, Dor Lotan MD, Erez Ramaty MD, Naama Peltz-Sinvani MD, Adi Brom MD, Michael Kogan MD, Yulia Panina MD, Maya Rosman MD, Carmel Friedrich MD, Irina Gringauz MD, Amir Dagan MD, Iris Kliers MD, Tomer Ziv-Baran PhD and Gad Segal MD

Background: Accurate pulse oximetry reading at hospital admission is of utmost importance, mainly for patients presenting with hypoxemia. Nevertheless, there is no accepted or evidence-based protocol for such structured measuring.

Objectives: To devise and assess a structured protocol intended to increase the accuracy of pulse oximetry measurement at hospital admission.

Methods: The authors performed a prospective comparison of protocol-based pulse-oximetry measurement with non-protocol based readings in consecutive patients at hospital admission. They also calculated the relative percentage of improvement for each patient (before and after protocol implementation) as a fraction of the change in peripheral capillary oxygen saturation (SpO2) from 100%.

Results: A total of 460 patients were recruited during a 6 month period. Implementation of a structured measurement protocol significantly changed saturation values. The SpO2 values of 24.7% of all study participants increased after protocol implementation (ranging from 1% to 21% increase in SpO2 values). Among hypoxemic patients (initial SpO2 < 90%), protocol implementation had a greater impact on final SpO2 measurements, increasing their median SpO2 readings by 4% (3–8% interquartile range; P < 0.05). Among this study population, 50% of the cohort improved by 17% of their overall potential and 25% improved by 50% of their overall improvement potential. As for patients presenting with hypoxemia, the median improvement was 31% of their overall SpO2 potential.

Conclusions: Structured, protocol based pulse-oximetry may improve measurement accuracy and reliability. The authors suggest that implementation of such protocols may improve the management of hypoxemic patients.

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