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עמוד בית
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November 2021
Guy Feldman MD, Yoram A. Weil MD, Ram Mosheiff MD, Amit Davidson MD, Nimrod Rozen MD PhD, and Guy Rubin MD

Background: Toward the end of 2019, the coronavirus disease-2019 (COVID-19) pandemic began to create turmoil for global health organizations. The illness, caused by the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus-2 (SARS-CoV-2), spreads by droplets and fomites and can rapidly lead to life-threatening lung disease, especially for the old and those with health co-morbidities. Treating orthopedic patients, who presented with COVID-19 while avoiding nosocomial transmission, became of paramount importance.

Objectives: To present relevant methods for pandemic control and hospital accommodation with emphasis on orthopedic surgery.

Methods: We searched search PubMed and Google Scholar electronic databases using the following keywords: COVID-19, SARS-CoV-2, screening tools, personal protective equipment, and surgery triage.

Results: We included 25 records in our analysis. The recommendations from these records were divided into the following categories: COVID-19 disease, managing orthopedic surgery in the COVID-19 era, general institution precautions, triage of orthopedic surgeries, preoperative assessment, surgical room setting, personal protection equipment, anesthesia, orthopedic surgery technical precautions, and department stay and rehabilitation.

Conclusions: Special accommodations tailored for each medical facility, based on disease burden and available resources can improve patient and staff safety and reduce elective surgery cancellations. This article will assist orthopedic surgeons during the COVID-19 medical crisis, and possibly for future pandemics

July 2018
Hagay Orbach MD, Nimrod Rozen MD PhD, Guy Rubin MD, Eytan Dujovny MD and Noam Bor MD

Background: Supracondylar humerus fractures are the most common elbow fractures in the pediatric population.

Objectives: To evaluate the outcomes of French's corrective osteotomy for correction of post-traumatic cubitus varus deformity in children.

Method: We conducted a retrospective review of medical charts of all patients who had undergone French's corrective osteotomy in our institution from 1998 to 2012. We recorded range of motion, cosmetic deformity, carrying angle, lateral cortex prominence index, hyperextension, and lateral cortex step before and after the surgery.

Results: Seven patients were enrolled the study. Average follow-up time was 4.6 years (range 2–9 years). An average of 18.3º of limited flexion (range 5º–35º) compared to the healthy elbow was recorded in three patients. Lateral condylar prominence was recorded in one patient. The average preoperative carrying angle was -20.5º (range -15º–30º) and postoperative angle was 9.6º (range 7º–13º). In comparison, the average carrying angle in the healthy elbow was 8.5º (range 4º–13º). No lateral cortex prominence was recorded. An average of 27.5º (range 15º–35º) of hyperextension of the distal fragment was recorded immediately postoperatively in four patients; however, during postoperative follow-up, the hyperextension was corrected spontaneously in all patients.

Conclusions: As described by French, osteotomy has the ability to correct the varus deformity only in the coronal plane. However, our research supports the assumption that hyperextension in the sagittal plane might be corrected spontaneously.

April 2018
Raja Hakim MD, Nimrod Rozen MD PhD, Andrea Zatkova PhD, Judit Krausz MD, Irit Elmalah MD and Ronen Spiegel MD
October 2017
Guy Feldman MD, Nimrod Rozen MD PhD and Guy Rubin MD

Dupuytren’s disease is a common benign fibromatosis of the palmar and digital fascia. The exact pathophysiology and epidemiology of this condition have not been entirely identified. Pathologic fibrous bands cause a flexion contracture of the metacarpal phalangeal joints and proximal interphalangeal joint. Treatment includes fasciectomy, needle fasciotomy, and enzymatic fasciectomy.

July 2013
A. Tal, G. Rubin and N. Rozen
 Background: Hip fractures are common in the elderly population, but surgical treatment of these fractures within the first 48 hours decreases morbidity and mortality. The management of patients with hip fracture requiring surgery who are taking warfarin anticoagulation is unclear.

Objectives: To determine the effect of vitamin K on hip fracture patients treated with warfarin.

Methods: We retrospectively examined the management of 21 patients with hip fractures who were being treated with warfarin at the time of admission. Vitamin K was given to 11 of the 21 patients. A third group, which served as a control, consisting of 35 hip fracture patients who were not being treated with anticoagulants was also evaluated.

Results: Patients who received vitamin K took fewer days to reach target international normalized ratio (INR) (1.73 ± 0.90 vs. 4.30 ± 1.89, P < 0.001) and had less preoperative time (2.64 ± 1.12 vs. 5.10 ± 2.42 days, P < 0.008) when compared with patients who did not receive vitamin K. In addition, these patients had statistically significantly shorter hospitalization stays (9.4 ± 1.9 and 13.2 ± 4.9 days, one-sided P < 0.06). There was no difference in the amount of blood found in the wound drains (111.8 ± 68.5 vs. 103.0 ± 69.4 ml) or the number of blood units administered (1.45 ± 1.29 vs. 2.00 ± 2.75 units).

Conclusions: Treatment with vitamin K for hip fracture patients who receive warfarin shortens preoperative time, reduces the length of hospitalization and probably reduces morbidity and mortality.

February 2011
G. Rubin, S. Krasnyansky, I. Gavish, I. Elmalah, O. Ben-Lulu and N. Rozen

Background: Routine histopathological analysis of bone extracted during total joint replacement is controversial.

Objectives: To evaluate the utility of routine histopathological analysis in total joint replacement.

Methods: We calculated the risk for discrepant diagnosis between the pre- and postoperative histopathological results by performing a meta-analysis of 11 studies (including our data). We also calculated the risk for significant discrepancies.

Results: The discrepant diagnoses analysis showed a random effect of 3% discrepancies (95% confidence interval 1.2–3.7%). Funnel plot indicates a publication bias; consequently, the conclusions from this analysis should be interpreted with caution. Regarding the significant discrepancy in diagnosis, we performed a meta-analysis of nine studies. Fixed-effects analysis of all the studies resulted in 0.16% significant discrepancies (95% CI[1] 0.02–0.30%) with no heterogeneity (Q = 3.93, degrees of freedom = 9, P = 0.14, I2 = 49.2%), and appropriate fixed-effects models.

Conclusions: We recommend no further routine histological examination, reserving this tool for cases with a controversial primary diagnosis and unexpected findings during the operation.






[1] CI = confidence interval


July 2010
M. Haddad, G. Rubin, M. Soudry and N. Rozen

Background: There is controversy as to which is the preferred treatment for distal radius intra-articular fractures – anatomic reduction or external fixation.

Objectives: To evaluate the radiologic and functional outcome following external fixation of these fractures.

Methods: Between January 2003 and March 2005, 43 patients with distal radius intra-articular fractures were treated using a mini-external AO device. Follow-up of 38 of the patients included X-rays at 1 week, 6 weeks and 6 months postoperatively. The Visual Analogue Scale was used to assess pain levels, and the Lidstrom criteria scale to evaluate functional outcome and wrist motion. Clinical and radiographic results were correlated.

Results: According to the Lidstrom criteria, the results were excellent in 31%, good in 61% and fair in 5.5%; 2.5% had a poor outcome. The results of the VAS[1] were good. Thirty-five patients gained a good range of wrist movement, but 3 had a markedly reduced range. We found statistical correlation between the radiographic and clinical results, emphasizing the value of good reduction. There was no correlation between fracture type (Frykman score) and radiologic results or clinical results.

Conclusions: External fixation seems to be the preferred method of treatment for distal radius intra-articular fractures, assuming that good reduction can be achieved. The procedure is also quick, the risk of infection is small, and there is little damage to the surrounding tissues.

 






[1] VAS = Visual Analogue Scale


May 2010
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