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עמוד בית
Sun, 03.03.24

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August 2019
Maria Infantino MD, Teresa Carbone BD, Mariangela Manfredi BD, Valentina Grossi BD, Maurizio Benucci MD, Miri Blank PhD, Yehuda Shoenfeld MD FRCP MaACR and Nicola Bizzaro MD
April 2019
Lazaros I. Sakkas MD PhD, Dimitrios P. Bogdanos MD PhD, Dimitrios Boumpas MD, Zisis Mamouris PhD, Athanasios Gkoutzourelas MD, Athanasios Mavropoulos PhD, Zisis Tsouris PhD, Stamatis-Nickοlaos Liossis MD, Dimitrios Daoussis MD, Dimitrios Vasilopoulos MD, Maria Tektonidou MD, Athanasios Tzioufas MD, George Efthymiou BSc, Efthymios Dardiotis MD, George Kitas MD PhD, Κassem Sharif MD, Miri Blank MD, Dimitrios Karussis MD, Doron Rimar MD, Gleb Slobodin MD, Bat-Sheva Porat-Katz MD, Zahava Vadasz MD PhD, Howard Amital MD MHA, Elias Toubi MD and Yehuda Shoenfeld MD FRCP MaACR
December 2018
Daphna Katz-Talmor B Med Sc, Shaye Kivity MD, Miri Blank PhD, Itai Katz B Med Sc, Ori Perry BS, Alexander Volkov MD, Iris Barshack MD, Howard Amital MD MHA, Yehuda Shoenfeld MD FRCP MaACR
October 2014
Tomer Bashi MD, Miri Blank PhD and Yehuda Shoenfeld MD FRCP
Carlo Perricone MD, Shunit Rinkevich-Shop PhD, Miri Blank PhD, Natalie Landa-Rouben PhD, Cristiano Alessandri MD, Fabrizio Conti MD, PhD, Jonathan Leor MD, Yehuda Shoenfeld MD FRCP and Guido Valesini MD
Serena Colafrancesco MD, Roberta Priori MD PhD, Cristiano Alessandri MD, Elisa Astorri MD PhD, Carlo Perricone MD, Miri Blank PhD, Nancy Agmon-Levin MD, Yehuda Shoenfeld MD FRCP MaACR and Guido Valesini MD
January 2008
Y. Shoenfeld, B. Gilburd, M. Abu-Shakra, H. Amital, O. Barzilai, Y. Berkun, M. Blank, G. Zandman-Goddard, U. Katz, I. Krause, P. Langevitz, Y. Levy, H. Orbach, V. Pordeus, M. Ram, Y. Sherer, E. Toubi and Y. Tomer
Y. Shoenfeld, G. Zandman-Goddard, L. Stojanovich, M. Cutolo, H. Amital, Y. Levy, M. Abu-Shakra, O. Barzilai, Y. Berkun, M. Blank, J.F. de Carvalho, A. Doria, B. Gilburd, U. Katz, I. Krause, P. Langevitz, H. Orbach, V. Pordeus, M. Ram, E. Toubi and Y. Sherer
Y. Shoenfeld, M. Blank, M. Abu-Shakra, H. Amital, O. Barzilai, Y. Berkun, N. Bizzaro, B. Gilburd, G. Zandman-Goddard, U. Katz, I. Krause, P. Langevitz, I.R. Mackay, H. Orbach, M. Ram, Y. Sherer, E. Toubi and M.E. Gershwin
M. Blank and Y. Shoenfeld

Idiotypic analyses of anti-DNA autoantibodies were widely reported a decade ago. More than 100 studies were conducted on one of the main analyzed idiotypes, the 16/6 Id of the anti-ssDNA monoclonal antibody. In this review we summarize current knowledge on the characteristics of the 16/6 Id[1], its link to infection and its target epitopes on other molecules known so far. This includes the modulation of T and B cell responses and gene expression by the 16/6 mAb[2] in vitro and in vivo. We focus on the ability and mechanisms by which this idiotype induces experimental lupus in naïve mice, manifested by autoantibody spread, kidney and brain involvement, and leukopenia associated with enhanced sedimentation rate. We also discuss various therapeutic modalities to treat 16/6 induced lupus in mice.

 

 







[1] Id = idiotype

[2] mAb = monoclonal antibody


V. Pordeus, O. Barzilai, Y. Sherer, R.R. Luiz, M. Blank, N. Bizzaro, D. Villalta, J-M. Anaya and Y. Shoenfeld


Background: Infectious agents are important in the pathogenesis of autoimmune disease since they are a major part of the environmental trigger of autoimmunity. A negative relationship between latitude and infectious disease species richness has been suggested.

Objectives: To examine whether their prevalence differs in two latitudinally different populations.

Methods: The prevalence of infections with Toxoplasma gondii, rubella virus, cytomegalovirus, Epstein-Barr virus and Treponema pallidum was compared between subjects from Italy and Colombia.

Results: We found high titers of antibodies against four of five microorganisms tested, Toxoplasma gondii (50.8%), rubella virus (German measles) (75%), cytomegalovirus (86.3%), Epstein-Barr virus (83.3%) and Treponema pallidum (6.3%) in completely healthy individuals from a tropical country (Colombia) and a European country (Italy). Differences between two groups of volunteers were noted regarding two infectious agents. The prevalence of immunoglobulin G anti-rubella antibodies was significantly higher among Italian subjects (85% vs. 67.9%, P = 0.002), whereas antibodies against CMV[1] were less prevalent among Italian as compared to Colombian subjects (77% vs. 92.9%, P < 0.001).

Conclusions: These differences might also result in a different tendency towards development of autoimmune diseases associated with these infectious agents in different populations.






[1] CMV = cytomegalovirus


September 2002
Gisele Zandman-Goddard, MD and Miri Blank, PhD
September 1999
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