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עמוד בית
Wed, 29.05.24

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November 2022
Shirley Shapiro MD, Shira Shoher MD, Dror Cantrell MD, Micha J. Rapoport MD

Retroperitoneal infiltration, also known as retroperitoneal fibrosis (RPF), is a rare condition, which mostly occurs in men over the age of 40 years. This condition involves inflammation of the soft tissue of the retroperitoneal cavity, most commonly around the infrarenal abdominal aorta, iliac arteries, ureters, and abdominal organs. Clinical manifestations consist of severe pain in the lower back, abdomen, or flank, which may radiate to the inguinal region. Pain may be acute at the onset and can be mistaken for renal colic. Renal and ureteral involvement is common and can develop into acute kidney injury and hypertensive crises.

April 2021
Michal A. Julius MD, Dror Cantrell MD, Saleh Sharif MD, Dana Zelnik Yovel MD, and Micha J. Rapoport MD

Coronavirus disease-2019 (COVID‐19) is recognized as a respiratory illness, which includes pulmonary consolidations, hypoxemic states, and hypercoagulopathic tendencies with a broad clinical severity. Recently, more reports have described post-infection manifestations. These include multi-system inflammatory syndrome in children (MIS-C) with more than 400 cases published since the start of the coronavirus disease pandemic. In October 2020, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) published 27 cases [1] describing the new multi-system inflammatory syndrome in adults (MIS-A). Nine of the cases were reported directly to the CDC, 7 from published case reports and another 11 patients found in three distinct case series

November 2018
Shlomit Koren MD, Michael Yoshpa MD, Ronit Koren MD, Dror Cantrell MD and Micha J. Rapoport MD

Background: Basal-bolus (BB) insulin treatment is increasingly used in poorly controlled diabetes patients during hospitalization and is commonly recommended at discharge; however, the extent of adherence with this recommendation is unknown.

Objectives: To determine short-term adherence of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) patients discharged from internal medicine wards with recommendation for BB insulin treatment.

Methods: Prescription (primary physician adherence) and purchase (patient adherence) of long-acting and short-acting insulins during the first month following discharge from internal medicine wards was determined in 153 T2DM patients. Adherence was defined as full if prescription/purchase of both basal (long-acting) and bolus (short-acting) insulin was completed, and as partial if only one kind of insulin (basal or bolus) was prescribed/purchased. Association between demographic and clinical parameters and adherence was determined.

Results: Full adherence with discharge instructions was higher for primary physicians than for patients )79.1% vs. 69.3%, respectively, P = 0.0182). Pre-hospitalization hemoglobin A1C was significantly associated with adherence by both patients and primary physicians (full-adherence group 9.04% ± 2.04%; no-adherence group 7.51% ± 1.35%, P = 0.002). Age was negatively associated with adherence of both primary physicians and patients; however, this association did not reach statistical significance. Patients with certain background diseases such as atrial fibrillation, coronary heart disease, and chronic heart failure had significantly worse adherence (P < 0.05). When the sole cause of admission was diabetes, full adherence (100%) of both primary physicians and patients was found.

Conclusions: Short-term adherence with discharge recommendation for BB insulin treatment is associated with pre-hospitalization patient characteristics.

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