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עמוד בית
Thu, 30.05.24

REVIEWS

IMAJ | volume 26

Journal 4, April 2024
pages: 266-268

A Personal View: The Post-Captivity Condition

1 Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, Reuth Medical and Rehabilitation Center, Tel Aviv, Israel 2 Faculty of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Ramat Aviv, Israel

Summary

Being in captivity as a prisoner of war (POW) and held by a hostile government usually occurs after a war. In general, wounded POWs do not receive proper medical treatment while being imprisoned or confined in a jail or a camp. War captivity could mean isolation, constant interrogations, humiliation, torture, malnutrition, starvation, and poor hygienic conditions. Immediately, or sometimes years after repatriation, mental and physical problems appear, which disturb the POW's social, family, and work networks. The suggested post-captivity condition assembles, under one umbrella, the various phenomena and complications after war captivity.

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