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עמוד בית Wed, 20.11.19

May 2016


Focus
Shiyovich MD, Ygal Plakht RN PhD, Katya Belinski RN BN and Harel Gilutz, MD

Background: Catastrophic life events are associated with the occurrence of cardiovascular incidents and worsening of the clinical course following such events.

Objectives: To evaluate the characteristics and long-term prognosis of Holocaust survivors presenting with acute myocardial infarction (AMI) compared to non-Holocaust survivors.

Methods: Israeli Jews who were born before 1941 and had been admitted to a tertiary medical center due to AMI during the period 2002–2012 were studied. Holocaust survivors were compared with non-Holocaust survivor controls using individual age matching.

Results: Overall 305 age-matched pairs were followed for up to 10 years after AMI. We found a higher prevalence of depression (5.9% vs. 3.3%, P = 0.045) yet a similar rate of cardiovascular risk factors, non-cardiovascular co-morbidity, severity of coronary artery disease, and in-hospital complications in survivors compared to controls. Throughout the follow-up period, similar mortality rates (62.95% vs. 63.9%, P = 0.801) and reduced cumulative mortality (0.9 vs. 0.96, HR = 0.780, 95%CI 0.636–0.956, P = 0.016) were found among survivors compared to age-matched controls, respectively. However, in a multivariate analysis survival was not found to be an independent predictor of mortality, although some tendency towards reduced mortality was seen (AdjHR = 0.84, 95%CI 0.68–1.03, P = 0.094). Depression disorder was associated with a 77.9% increase in the risk for mortality. 

Conclusions: Holocaust survivors presenting with AMI were older and had a higher prevalence of depression than controls. No excessive, and possibly even mildly improved, risk of mortality was observed in survivors compared with controls presenting with AMI. Possibly, specific traits that are associated with surviving catastrophic events counter the excess risk of such events following AMI.

 

Esteban González-López MD PhD and Rosa Ríos-Cortés MA

During the Nazi period, numerous doctors and nurses played a nefarious role. In Germany they were responsible for the sterilization and killing of disabled persons. Furthermore, the Nazi doctors used concentration camp inmates as guinea pigs in medical experiments for military or racial purposes. A study of the collaboration of doctors with National Socialism exemplifies behavior that must be avoided. Combining medical teaching with lessons from the Holocaust could be a way to transmit Medical Ethics to doctors, nurses and students. The authors describe a study tour with medical students to Poland, to the largest Nazi extermination camp, Auschwitz, and to the city of Krakow. The tour is the final component of a formal course entitled: “The Holocaust, a Reflection from Medicine” at the Autónoma University of Madrid, Spain. Visiting sites related to the Holocaust, the killing centers and the sites where medical experiments were conducted has a singular meaning for medical students. Tolerance, non-discrimination, and the value of human life can be both learnt and taught at the very place where such values were utterly absent.

Perspective
Yulia Treister-Goltzman MD and Roni Peleg MD

There has been a dramatic increase in the number of female physicians in all fields and specializations of medicine, but this increase has not resulted in a redistribution of domestic tasks and responsibilities. Reviewing the literature of the last two decades (April 1994 to April 2014) on how female physicians cope with the challenge of balancing their family and professional lives for the duration of their professional careers revealed that they suffer from the work-family conflict more than other professionals and that it has a more negative effect on women than on men. Women physicians consider work-family balance significantly when making career choices. These considerations affect their career success, their productivity as faculty members, their marital life, and parenthood. Having a supportive spouse at home and a facilitating mentor at work are important for a positive work-family balance among female physicians. Special career-supporting measures, such as flexible work schedules and expanded support for childcare over the course of work and when taking part in academic activities, are critical for female physicians.

Original Articles
Dan Meir Livovsky MD, Orit Pappo MD, Galina Skarzhinsky PhD, Asaf Peretz MD AGAF, Elliot Turvall MSc and Zvi Ackerman MD

Background: Recently we observed patients with chronic liver disease (CLD) or chronic reflux symptoms (CRS) who developed gastric polyps (GPs) while undergoing surveillance gastroscopies for the detection of either esophageal varices or Barrett's esophagus, respectively.

Objectives: To identify risk factors for GP growth and estimate the gastric polyp growth rate (GPGR).

Methods: GPGR was defined as the number of days since the first gastroscopy (without polyps) in the surveillance program, until the gastroscopy when a GP was discovered.

Results: Gastric polyp growth rates in CLD and CRS patients were similar. However, hyperplastic gastric polyps (HGPs) were detected more often (87.5% vs. 60.5%, P = 0.051) and at a higher number (2.57 ± 1.33 vs. 1.65 ± 0.93, P = 0.021) in the CLD patients. Subgroup analysis revealed the following findings only in CLD patients with HGPs: (i) a positive correlation between the GPGR and the patient's age; the older the patient, the longer the GPGR (r = 0.7, P = 0.004). (ii) A negative correlation between the patient's age and the Ki-67 proliferation index value; the older the patient, the lower the Ki-67 value (r = -0.64, P = 0.02). No correlation was detected between Ki-67 values of HGPs in CLD patients and the presence of portal hypertension, infection with Helicobacter pylori, or proton pump inhibitor use.

Conclusions: In comparison with CRS patients, CLD patients developed HGPs more often and at a greater number. Young CLD patients may have a tendency to develop HGPs at a faster rate than elderly CLD patients.

Shahar Grunner MD, Pavel Kotlarsky MD, Yaron Berkovich MD, Adi Givon BSc and Yaniv Keren MD

Background: Kite surfing is one of the trendiest water sports worldwide. With its growing popularity evidence has begun to accumulate regarding its potential for injuries which range from minor insults to death. 

Objectives: To define the epidemiology and distribution of common kite surfing injuries among recreational athletes. 

Methods: An open letter was published on the web calling for surfers to report injuries inflicted during recreational kite surfing. In addition, we received data from the National Center for Trauma and Emergency Medicine Research. 

Results: Our survey yielded only a small series of 48 injuries. Most kite surfing injuries are isolated injuries, although some are life threatening as occurred in two surfers who died due to severe head injuries. Among the injuries, 72.9% are related to the musculoskeletal system, followed by head and chest injuries (18.7% and 14.6%, respectively). Of the orthopedic injuries 48.6% are fractures, the majority in the lower limbs (58.8%). 

Conclusions: Our findings combined with those of previous articles on kite surfing-associated injuries contribute to a better understanding of such injuries, raise awareness in emergency department personnel, and indicate precautions needed to avoid or lessen incapacitating and potentially life-threatening injuries. 

 

Itay Wiser MD PHD, Alon Scope MD, David Azriel BSc, Elhanan Zloczower BScMed, Narin N. Carmel MD and Avshalom Shalom MD

Background: Clinicopathological risk factors for cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (CSCCHN) are associated with local recurrence and metastasis. 

Objectives: To compare the incidence and risk factors of CSCCHN by age and gender in order to help refine the clinical evaluation and treatment process.

Methods: Clinical and pathological data of all patients diagnosed with CSCCHN during 2009–2011 were obtained from a central pathology laboratory in Israel. Estimated incidence rate calculation was standardized to the 2010 Israeli population. Independent risk factors for poorly differentiated CSCCHN were analyzed using logistic regression.

Results: CSCCHN was diagnosed in 621 patients. Mean age was 75.2 years; mean tumor horizontal diameter was 11.1 ± 6.8 mm. The overall estimated incidence rate in males was higher than in females (106.2 vs. 54.3 per 1,000,000, P < 0.001). Twenty cases (3.2%) had poorly differentiated CSCCHN. Scalp and ear anatomic locations were observed more often in males than in females (22.1% vs. 6.1% and 20.3% vs. 3.3%, respectively, P < 0.001). Per 1 mm increment, tumor horizontal diameter increased the risk for poorly differentiated CSCCHN by 6.7% (95%CI 1.3–12.4%, P = 0.014). 

Conclusions: CSCCHN clinicopathological risk factors are not distributed evenly among different age and gender groups. 

 

Shachaf Ofer-Shiber MD and Yair Molad MD

Background: Tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNFα) inhibitors are indicated for patients with psoriatic arthritis (PsA) in whom conventional disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs (DMARDs) are insufficient to achieve disease remission. 

Objectives: To determine the value of acute-phase reactant levels at diagnosis of psoriatic arthritis in predicting the need for biologic treatment with TNFα inhibitors.

Methods: We conducted a longitudinal observational study of an inception cohort of 71 consecutive patients diagnosed with psoriatic arthritis. C-reactive protein (CRP) was assayed for all patients at their first visit.

Results: All patients were treated with one or more DMARDs, mainly methotrexate (81.6%). Thirty-seven patients (52.11%) had an inadequate response and received at least one TNF inhibitor. CRP level at diagnosis was positively correlated with need for a TNF inhibitor (P = 0.009, HR 1.8, 95%CI 1.27–1.85). Patients with CRP > 0.9 mg/dl at diagnosis started biologic treatment significantly earlier than patients with a lower level (P = 0.003, HR 2.62, 95%CI 0.393–2.5).

Conclusions: In patients with psoriatic arthritis, CRP ≥ 0.9 mg/dl at diagnosis significantly predicts an earlier need for a TNF inhibitor to achieve disease control.

 

Eran Millet MD, Josef Haik MD, Elad Ofir MD, Yael Mardor MD, Eyal Winkler MD, Moti Harats MD and Ariel Tessone MD

Background: Although fat grafting is a common technique to repair defects after breast cancer reconstruction surgery and has a low complication rate, the relation between fat grafting and the risk of breast cancer is unknown. Clinical trials to investigate this connection can elucidate the benefits and potential risks of fat grafting in oncology patients.

Objectives:To establish an efficient experimental model, using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans, for comparing different breast tumor study groups post-fat grafting. 

Methods: Breast tumor cells were injected into immunocompromised mice. After tumors formed they were removed. Liposuction was performed in a female human donor and fat was collected. Cells were extracted from the fat by enzymatic digestion. Immunocompromised mice were randomized into four groups: a preliminary experiment group and three equal groups according to the type of fat graft: (i) fresh fat enriched with adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells (AdMSCs), (ii) fresh fat without cell enrichment, and (iii) no fat injected. Tumor volume was assessed by serial MRI scans. 

Results: The rate of tumor growth was higher in the enriched fat group compared to the non-enriched fat group. 

Conclusions: This experimental model is an effective measurable method, allowing future investigation of the effect of autologous fat on breast cancer.

 

Efraim Siegler MD, Yakir Segev MD, Lena Mackuli MD, Ron Auslender MD, Mayan Shiner PhD and Ofer Lavie MD

Background: Vulvar and vaginal malignant and premalignant lesions are uncommon and are clinically heterogeneous diseases with two pathways of carcinogenesis: human papillomavirus (HPV) induced or non-HPV induced.                    

Objectives: To evaluate the demographic and clinical characteristics associated with vulvar or vaginal cancer and vulvar and vaginal intraepithelial neoplasia 3 (VIN3, VAIN3).

Methods: We conducted a retrospective chart review of 148 women with vulvar and vaginal malignancy and pre-malignancy for the period October 2004 to October 2012, and identified 59 and 19 patients with vulvar and vaginal cancer respectively, and 57 and 13 patients with VIN3 and VAIN3 respectively

Results: The median age of vulvar cancer patients was 30 years older than that of VIN3 patients. HPV was found in 60% and 66.6% of vulvar and vaginal cancer patients respectively, and in 82.3% and 84.6% of patients with VIN3 and VAIN3 respectively. A history of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) or warts was observed in 10% and 10.5% of vulvar and vaginal cancer patients respectively, and in 57.9% and 46% of patients with VIN3 and VAIN3 respectively. In 52.6% of patients the vaginal cancer was metastases from other organs. 

Conclusions: Most women with vulvar carcinoma are older than 70 years old. VIN3 and VAIN3 are associated with HPV infection and the most prevalent type is HPV16. Almost half the vaginal cancers are associated with metastases from other organs and almost half of VAIN3 is associated with past cervical dysplasia or carcinoma. 

 

Dan Levin, Salim Adawi MD, David A Halon MBChB, Avinoam Shiran MD, Ihab Asmer, Ronen Rubinshtein MD and Ronen Jaffe MD

Background: Radial artery occlusion (RAO) may occur following transradial catheterization, precluding future use of the vessel for vascular access or as a coronary bypass graft. Recanalization of RAO may occur; however, long-term radial artery patency when revascularization is more likely to be required has not been investigated. Transradial catheterization is usually performed via 5-Fr or 6-Fr catheters. Insertion of 7-Fr sheaths into the radial artery enables complex coronary interventions but may increase the risk of RAO. 

Objective: To assess the long-term radial artery patency following transradial catheterization via 7-Fr sheaths.

Methods: Antegrade radial artery blood flow was assessed by duplex-ultrasound in 43 patients who had undergone transradial catheterization via a 7-Fr sheath. 

Results: All patients had received intravenous unfractionated heparin with a mean activated clotting time (ACT) of 247 ± 56 seconds. Twenty-four patients (56%) had received a glycoprotein IIbIIIa inhibitor and no vascular site complications had occurred. Mean time interval from catheterization to duplex-ultrasound was 507 ± 317 days. Asymptomatic RAO was documented in 8 subjects (19%). Reduced body weight was the only significant univariate predictor of RAO (78 ± 11 vs. 89 ± 13 kg, P = 0.031). In a bivariate model using receiver operator characteristic (ROC) curves, the combination of lower weight and shorter ACT offered best prediction of RAO (area under the ROC curve 0.813). 

Conclusions: Asymptomatic RAO was found at late follow-up in approximately 1 of 5 patients undergoing transradial catheterization via a 7-Fr sheath and was associated with lower body weight and shorter ACT. 

 

Reviews
Daniel Elbirt MD, Keren Mahlab-Guri MD, Shira Bezalel-Rosenberg MD, Ilan Asher MD and Zev Sthoeger MD
Case Communications
Keren Kremer MD, Michal Dekel MD, Avi Gadoth MD, Jacob Giris MD DSc and Jacob N. Ablin MD
Netanel Elkabetz MD, Danielle Bracco BA, Galit Zlotnik MD, Abdulla Watad MD, Stefan Mausbach MD and Howard Amital MD MHA
הבהרה משפטית: כל נושא המופיע באתר זה נועד להשכלה בלבד ואין לראות בו ייעוץ רפואי או משפטי. אין הר"י אחראית לתוכן המתפרסם באתר זה ולכל נזק שעלול להיגרם. כל הזכויות על המידע באתר שייכות להסתדרות הרפואית בישראל. מדיניות פרטיות
ז'בוטינסקי 35 רמת גן, בניין התאומים 2 קומות 10-11, ת.ד. 3566, מיקוד 5213604. טלפון: 03-6100444, פקס: 03-5753303