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עמוד בית
Sat, 15.06.24

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May 2024
Jonathan Eisenberger BSc, Shmuel Somer BSc, Eyal Nachum MD, Eilon Ram MD, Jacob Lavee MD, Leonid Sternik MD, Jeffrey Morgan MD

Background: Long-term support with a HeartMate 3 (HM3) left ventricular assist device (LVAD) has improved outcomes of patients with end-stage heart failure. However, there is a paucity of data on the outcomes of patients who underwent concomitant cardiac surgical procedure (CCSP) during HM3-LVAD implantation.

Objectives: To assess our single-center experience with patients who underwent CCSP during the implantation of an HM3-LVAD.

Methods: From December 2016 until April 2022, 131 adult patients underwent HM3-LVAD implantation. A total of 23 patients underwent CCSP during the HM3-LVAD implantation+CCSP, and 108 underwent only HM3-LVAD implantation (HM3-only).

Results: The median age was 59 ± 11 years (range 54-67), 82% (n=108) were male, and 76% (n=100) were implanted as a bridge-to-transplant. The concomitant procedures performed during the implantation included 8 aortic valve repairs/replacements, 14 tricuspid valve repairs, 4 patent foramen ovales or atrial septal defect closures, and 3 other cardiac procedures. The mean cardiopulmonary bypass time was 113 ± 58 minutes for the HM3-only group and 155 ± 47 minutes for the HM3+CCSP group (P = 0.007). The mortality rates at 30 days, 6 months, and 12 months post-implantation were 2 (9%), 5 (22%), and 6 (26%) respectively for the HM3+CCSP group, and 7 (6%), 18 (17%), and 30 (28%) for the HM3-only group (P = 0.658, 0.554, and 1.000).

Conclusions: Our experience demonstrated no significant difference in the 30-day, 6-month, and 12-month mortality rates for patients who underwent a CCSP during HM3-LVAD implantation compared to patients who did not undergo CCSP during HM3-LVAD implantation.

December 2023
Niv Soffair MD, Eran Shostak MD, Ovadia Dagan MD, Orit Manor-Shulman MD, Yael Feinstein MD, Gabriel Amir MD, Georgy Frenkel MD, Amichai Rotstein MD, Merav Dvir-Orgad MD, Einat Birk MD, Joanne Yacobovich MD, Ofer Schiller MD

Background: Ventricular assist devices (VADs) play a critical and increasing role in treating end-stage heart failure in pediatric patients. A growing number of patients are supported by VADs as a bridge to heart transplantation. Experience with VADs in the pediatric population is limited, and experience in Israel has not been published.

Objectives: To describe this life-saving technology and our experience with VAD implantation in children with heart failure, including characteristics and outcomes.

Methods: We conducted a retrospective chart review of all patients who underwent VAD implantation at Schneider Children's Medical Center from 2018 to 2023.

Results: We analyzed results of 15 children who underwent VAD implantation. The youngest was 2.5 years old and weighed 11 kg at implantation. In eight patients, HeartMate 3, a continuous-flow device, was implanted. Seven patients received Berlin Heart, a pulsatile-flow device. Three children required biventricular support; 11 underwent heart transplants after a median duration of 169 days. Two patients died due to complications while awaiting a transplant; two were still on VAD support at the time of submission of this article. Successful VAD support was achieved in 86.6% of patients. In the last 5 years,79%  of our heart transplant patients received VAD support prior to transplant.

Conclusions: Circulatory assist devices are an excellent bridge to transplantation for pediatric patients reaching end-stage heart failure. VADs should be carefully selected, and implantation techniques tailored to patient's weight and diagnosis at a centralized pediatric cardiac transplantation center. Israeli healthcare providers should be cognizant of this therapeutic alternative.

November 2023
Jonathan Eisenberger BSc, Shmuel Somer BSc, Eilon Ram MD, Eyal Nachum MD, Jonathan Frogal MD, Shany Levin MA, Jacob Lavee MD, Leonid Sternik MD, Jeffrey Morgan MD

Background: Unfractionated heparin is the preferred anticoagulant used during open heart surgeries, including left ventricular assist device (LVAD) implantation. In cases in which patients are heparin-induced thrombocytopenia positive (HIT+), the accepted practice has been to substitute heparin with bivalirudin. This practice may be associated with significant bleeding and adverse outcomes.

Objectives: To review our experience with HIT+ patients who were heparin-induced thrombocytopenia with thrombosis negative (HITT-) and who underwent HeartMate 3 LVAD implantation using heparin intraoperatively rather than bivalirudin.

Methods: From 2016 to 2022, 144 adult patients were implanted with HeartMate 3 LVAD at our center. Among them, 7 were detected as HIT+ but HITT- and therefore were prescribed intraoperatively with heparin and treated pre- and postoperatively with bivalirudin. We reviewed the preoperative, intraoperative, and postoperative characteristics as well as short-term mortality and the complication rates of these HIT+ patients.

Results: The median age of our cohort was 56 years (51–60), 71% were male (n=5), all were INTERMACS Level 1, and most were bridged to transplant (n=6, 86%). The 30-day mortality rate post-implantation was 0%. The average 24-hour chest drain postoperative output was 1502.86 ± 931.34 ml. There were no intraoperative pump thromboses, perioperative thromboses, cerebrovascular accidents, or gastrointestinal bleeding within the first 24 hours postoperative. One patient required a revision due to bleeding.

Conclusions: Intraoperative unfractionated heparin may be administered to patients who are HIT+ and HITT- while undergoing LVAD implantation. However, further investigation is required.

June 2020
Veacheslav Zilbermints MD, Oren Israeli MD, Binyamin Ben Abraham MD, Tuvia Ben-Gal MD, Victor Rubchevsky MD, Dan Aravot MD, Hanoch Kashtan MD, Nikolai Menasherov MD and David Aranovich MD

Background: Left ventricular assist devices (LVADs) are used more commonly in patients with advanced-stage heart failure. Some of these patients may require elective or urgent abdominal surgical procedures.

Objectives: To determine the outcomes of the management of LVAD-supported patients who underwent elective and urgent abdominal surgical procedures in our institution.

Methods: A retrospective review was conducted on 93 patients who underwent LVAD implantation between August 2008 and January 2017. All abdominal surgeries in these patients were studied, and their impact on postoperative morbidity and mortality was evaluated.

Results: Ten patients underwent abdominal surgical procedures. Of these procedures, five were emergent and five were elective. The elective cases included one bariatric surgery for morbid obesity, one hiatal hernia repair, two cholecystectomies, and one small bowel resection for a carcinoid tumor. The emergency cases included suspected ischemic colitis, right colectomy for bleeding adenocarcinoma, laparotomy due to intraabdominal bleeding, open cholecystectomy for gangrenous cholecystitis, and laparotomy for sternal and abdominal wall infection. All patients undergoing elective procedures survived. Of the five patients who underwent emergency surgery, three died (60%, P = 0.16) and one presented with major morbidity. One of the two survivors required reintervention. In total, 12 interventions were performed on this group of patients.

Conclusions: It is safe to perform elective abdominal procedures for LVAD-supported patients. The prognosis of these patients undergoing emergency surgery is poor and has high mortality and morbidity rates.

February 2014
Offer Amir, Yaron D. Barac, Arieh Eden, Shtiwi Sawaed, Victor Rubchevsky and Dan Aravot
December 2007
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