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עמוד בית
Mon, 17.06.24

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February 2007
N. Slijper,,I. Sukhotnik, A. urora Toubi, J. Mogilner

Background: Testicular torsion associated with undescended testis is uncommon but requires immediate treatment. Ultrasound Doppler is recognized as the preferred imaging modality for testicular torsion due to its high specificity, sensitivity and availability.

Objectives: To determine the accuracy of ultrasound Doppler in diagnosis of torsion of undescended testis.

Methods: We describe three patients with known undescended testis who were admitted with groin pain and had preoperative ultrasound Doppler. The discrepancy between these and the intraoperative findings is discussed.

Results: In two patients incarcerated inguinal hernia was diagnosed with ultrasound Doppler; however, surgery revealed torsion of an undescended testis. In the third patient ultrasound Doppler diagnosed torsion of undescended testis, but at surgery incarcerated inguinal hernia was found, without evidence of testicular torsion.

Conclusions: Torsion of undescended testis should be a clinical rather than radiologic diagnosis.
 

January 2006
R. Shaoul and A. Toubi

We present the case of a 14 day old baby in whom we observed the evolution of idippathic hypertrophic pyloric stenosis.

November 2005
N. Sharon, J. Schachter, R.T. Talnir, J. First, U. Rubinstein and R. Bilik
A. Balbir-Gurman, A.M. Nahir, Y. Braun-Moscovici and M. Soudack
December 2003
G.N. Bachar, A. Belensky, F. Greif, E. Atar, Y. Gat, M. Itkin and A. Verstanding

Background: Ovarian vein embolization was recently suggested as the preferred treatment for chronic pelvic pain syndrome.

Objective: To evaluate the technical feasibility, complications and early clinical and radiographic results of ovarian vein embolization in women with pelvic pain syndrome.

Methods: Percutaneous transcatheter ovarian vein embolization with coils was performed in six patients aged 27–53 years who presented with pelvic pain syndrome. All had lower abdominal pain, and pelvic varicosities were found on Doppler ultrasound and retrograde ovarian vein venography. Embolization was done unilaterally in three patients (on the left side) and bilaterally in three. Mean follow-up by telephone questionnaire was 7.3 months.

Results: The procedure was technically successful in all patients. Two patients reported partial relief of symptoms (33.3%) and three had complete relief (50%), for a total of 5 patients (83.3%) with some measure of improvement. There were no complications following the procedure.

Conclusions: Percutaneous transcatheter ovarian vein embolization seems to be safe and feasible for the treatment of pelvic pain syndrome. The procedure is performed on an outpatient basis and is well tolerated by patients.

June 2003
A. Ben-Haroush, Y. Yogev, R. Mashiach and I. Meizner

Background: Bleeding in the first trimester of pregnancy is a common phenomenon, associated with early pregnancy loss. In many instances a subchorionic hematoma is found sonographically.

Objective: To evaluate the possible benefit of bed-rest in women with threatened abortion and sonographically proven subchorionic hematoma, and to examine the possible relationship of duration of vaginal bleeding, hematoma size, and gestational age at diagnosis to pregnancy outcome.

Methods: The study group consisted of 230 women of 2,556 (9%) referred for ultrasound examination because of vaginal bleeding in the first half of pregnancy, who were found to have a subchorionic hematoma in the presence of a singleton live embryo or fetus. All patients were advised bed-rest at home; 200 adhered to this recommendation for the duration of vaginal bleeding (group 1) and 30 continued their usual lifestyle (group 2). All were followed with repeated sonograms at 7 day intervals until bleeding ceased, the subchorionic hematoma disappeared, or abortion occurred. The groups were compared for size of hematoma, duration of bleeding, and gestational age at diagnosis in relation to pregnancy outcome (spontaneous abortion, term or preterm delivery).

Results: The first bleeding episode occurred at 12.6 ± 3.4 weeks of gestation (range 7–20 weeks) and lasted for 28.8 ± 19.1 days (range 4–72 days). The women who adhered to bed-rest had fewer spontaneous abortions (9.9% vs. 23.3%, P = 0.006) and a higher rate of term pregnancy (89 vs. 70%, P = 0.004) than those who did not. There was no association between duration of vaginal bleeding, hematoma size, or gestational age at diagnosis of subchorionic hematoma and pregnancy outcome.

Conclusions: Fewer spontaneous abortions and a higher rate of term pregnancy were noted in the bed-rest group. However, the lack of randomization and retrospective design of the outcome data collection preclude a definite conclusion. A large prospective randomized study is required to confirm whether bed-rest has a real therapeutic effect.

September 2002
Yaacov Ori, MD, Haim Neuman, MD, Avry Chagnac, MD, Annette Siegal, MD, Ana Tobar, MD, Maxim Itkin, MD, Uzi Gafter, MD, PhD and Asher Korzets, MB, BS

Background: The use of an automated biopsy system for renal biopsy has recently gained popularity, but its safety in single functioning kidneys is unclear.

Objective: To report our experience with the automated system for closed renal biopsy during a 5 year period.

Methods: Eighty-five patients underwent percutaneous native renal biopsy with the automated biopsy gun (16G needle) under real-time ultrasound. They were chronologically divided into two groups: 41 patients (group A), using an older ultrasound machine; and 44 patients (group B), using a newer ultrasound machine. Nine patients biopsied with a manual 14G Tru-cut needle served as the control (group C).

Results: The number of "attempted" passes at the kidney was 4.0 ± 0.1 in group B, 4.7 ± 0.3 in group A (P < 0.05 vs. group B), and 5.8 ± 0.5 in group C (P < 0.01 vs. group B). The number of successful passes did not differ (3.3 ± 0.1, 3.3 ± 0.1, 3.1 ± 0.2). The ratio of "attempted/successful" was 1.28 ± 0.07 in group B, 1.95 ± 0.38 in A, and 1.90 ± 0.21 in C (P < 0.01 vs. B). The number of glomeruli obtained was similar in the three groups. Adequate tissue was obtained in 95%, 98%, and 100%, respectively. Hemoglobin decreased by 4.3 ± 1.1% in group B, 6.9 ± 1.3% in group A, and 11.3 ± 1.8% in group C (P < 0.05 vs. B). Perinephric/subcapsular hematoma occurred in 5 patients (11.4%) in group A (2 taking aspirin), in 2 patients (4.9%) in group B, and in none in group C. The necessity for blood transfusion post-biopsy was similar in all groups. Four of five patients with single functioning kidneys (one in group A and four in group B) had uneventful biopsies, and adequate tissue was obtained in three.

Conclusions: The use of the automated biopsy gun is effective, safe and has a low rate of major complications. It may be used safely in single functioning kidneys.

Imad R. Makhoul, MD, DSc, Monica Epelman, MD, Imad Kassis, MD, Marcelo Daitzchman, MD and Polo Sujov, MD
June 2002
Ron Reshef, MD, Wisam Sbeit, MD and Jesse Lachter, MD
November 2001
Baruch Klin, MD, Lev Zlotkevich, MD, Tifha Horne, MD, Yigal Efrati, MD, Francis Serour, MD and Gad Lotan, MD

Background: Acute scrotal pain in children presents a major diagnostic and therapeutic challenge. Epididymitis has been considered uncommon in childhood. The clinical spectrum and therapeutic policy of the acute scrotum in children is continually being reassessed.

Objectives: To determine whether there has been an increase in the incidence of epididymitis in children and to advocate a more selective surgical approach to the acute scrotum.

Methods: We conducted a retrospective review of 65 children admitted to our department of pediatric surgery with the diagnosis of acute scrotum during a 5 year period.

Results: Of the 65 children admitted with the diagnosis of acute scrotum, epididymitis was diagnosed in 42 (64.6%). The remaining cases included torsion of the testis in 12 patients (18.5%), torsion of the appendix testis in 5 (7.7%), scrotal pain and minimal physical findings in 4 (6.1%), and scrotal hematoma and idiopathic scrotal edema in one patient each. Doppler ultrasound of the groin, color Doppler ultrasound of the testis and testicular nuclide scintigraphy (Tc-99m scan) examinations were performed on 49, 30 and 57 occasions, respectively; the Tc-99m scan was the most effective tool. All the patients with epididymitis were diagnosed before surgical intervention and were treated conservatively.

Conclusions: We observed an increasing frequency of epididymitis in children admitted with the diagnosis of acute scrotum.
 

October 2001
Alexander Belenky, MD, PhD, Maya Cohen, MD and Gil N. Bachar, MD

Background: Leiomyoma is the common benign tumor of the female genital tract. The traditional treatment is hysterectomy, myomectomy or medical therapy by hormonal manipulation. Uterine arterial embolization, a recognized treatment for acute pelvic hemorrhage, has recently been applied to the management of non-acute uterine hemorrhage due to leiomyoma.

Objective: To describe our experience with uterine arterial embolization for the management of uterine fibroid.

Methods: Uterine arterial embolization was performed in nine patients with leiomyomas in whom medical therapy failed and who sought to avoid surgery.

Results: Follow-up ultrasound examination after 2 months revealed an average reduction in fibroid volume of 38%. There were no early or long-term complications.

Cunclusions: Uterine arterial embolization appears to be effective and safe in the management of symptomatic leiomyomas. It is a promising alternative to myomectomy or hysterectomy and warrants further investigation in this setting.
 

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