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עמוד בית
Thu, 13.06.24

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September 2022
Yotam Kolben MD, Henny Azmanov MD, Yuval Ishay MD, Efrat Orenbuch-Harroch MD, and Yael Milgrom MD.
December 2020
Nader Abdel-Rahman MD and Gabriel Izbicki MD

For most passengers, even those with respiratory disease, air travel is safe and comfortable. Some travelers may experience hypoxia at sea level but may not need supplemental oxygen during air travel in a hypobaric hypoxic environment. For some individuals compensatory pulmonary mechanisms may be inadequate, causing profound hypoxia. In addition, venous thromboembolism/pulmonary emboli may occur, especially during long haul flights. With adequate screening, patients at risk can be identified, therapeutic solutions can be proposed for the flight, and most can travel can continue safely with supplemental oxygen and other preventive measures.

August 2019
Eyal Meltzer MD, Lara Weiss, Mollie Lobl, Eyal Leshem MD and Shmuel Stienlauf MD

Background: Travelers' diarrhea (TD) is frequently encountered in people traveling from high-income to low-income countries; however, its epidemiology in those traveling between high-income countries is not known.

Objectives: To evaluate the incidence of diarrhea in North American students relocating to Israel.

Methods: A retrospective cohort study involving medical students from the United States and Canada relocating to Israel was conducted. Students who relocated to Israel during 2010–2016 were contacted by email to participate in an anonymous survey. Data included demographic information as well as occurrence, timing, duration, and outcome of diarrhea after relocation.

Results: Ninety-seven students participated in the survey. Most (93.7%) students relocated from the United States or Canada. The period-prevalence of diarrhea was 69.1%. The incidence of diarrhea declined from 34.8 cases per 100 student-months during the first month after relocation to 1.3 cases per 100 student-months after 1 year. The duration of diarrhea was up to 1 week in 72.7%. Students who reported diarrhea were younger than students who did not (mean age 24.0 ± 2.2 and 28.4 ± 1.8 years, respectively, P < 0.001). No other demographic parameter was significantly associated with a higher likelihood of diarrhea.

Conclusions: A high proportion of North American medical students relocating to Israel reported diarrhea with clinical and epidemiological features similar to classic TD. Further studies are needed to elucidate the causative agents of TD in Israel.

April 2016
Amir Tanay MD

Chikungunya fever (CHIK-F) has been increasingly documented among Western travelers returning from areas with chikungunya virus transmission, which are also popular tourist sites.  We present three Israeli travelers who developed fever, maculopapular rash and long-standing arthralgias while visiting northern Indian states not known to be involved in the chikungunya fever epidemic. We also present an epidemiological review of the chikungunya epidemic over the past decades. Rare systemic manifestations of this disorder, like catastrophic antiphospholipid syndrome (CAPS) and adult onset still’s syndrome, are discussed. The present era of international travel poses a novel diagnostic and epidemiologic challenge and we must increase our awareness to the possibility of an exotic tropical infectious disease.

September 2007
June 2005
R. Ben-Ami, Y. Siegman-Igra, E. Anis, G.J. Brook, S. Pitlik, M. Dan and M. Giladi
 Background: Short trips to holiday resorts in Mombassa, Kenya, have gained popularity among Israelis since the early 1990s. A cluster of cases of malaria among returned travelers raised concern that preventive measures were being neglected.

Objectives: To characterize the demographic and clinical features of malaria acquired in Kenya, and to assess the adequacy of preventive measures.

Methods: Data were collected from investigation forms at the Ministry of Health. All persons who acquired malaria in Kenya during the years 1999–2001 were contacted by phone and questioned about use of chemoprophylaxis, attitudes towards malaria prevention, and disease course. Further information was extracted from hospital records.

Results: Kenya accounted for 30 of 169 (18%) cases of malaria imported to Israel, and was the leading source of malaria in the study period. Of 30 malaria cases imported from Kenya, 29 occurred after short (1–2 weeks) travel to holiday resorts in Mombassa. Average patient age was 43 ± 12 years, which is older than average for travelers to tropical countries. Only 10% of the patients were fully compliant with malaria chemoprophylaxis. The most common reason for non-compliance was the belief that short travel to a holiday resort carries a negligible risk of malaria. Only 3 of 13 patients (23%) who consulted their primary physician about post-travel fever were correctly diagnosed with malaria. Twenty percent of cases were severe enough to warrant admission to an intensive care unit; one case was fatal.

Conclusions: Measures aimed at preventing malaria and its severe sequelae among travelers should concentrate on increasing awareness of risks and compliance with malaria chemoprophylaxis.

March 2005
Z. Habot-Wilner, J. Moisseiev, H. Bin and B. Rubinovitch
November 2002
Alexander Gorshtein, MD, Yair Levy, MD and Yehuda Shoenfeld, MD
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