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עמוד בית
Tue, 04.10.22

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February 2017
Alexander Margulis MD, Allan Billig MD, Jhonatan Elia MD, Yair Shachar MD and Neta Adler MD

Background: Burn scar reconstruction is extremely challenging, even for the most proficient reconstructive surgeon. Within the arsenal of tools at the plastic surgeon’s disposal, tissue expansion provides an efficient modality for reconstruction despite the reported complication rates. 

Objectives: To critically review our experience with tissue expansion for burn scar reconstruction, comparing particularly the adult and pediatric populations.

Methods: We conducted a retrospective study of the outcomes of patients who underwent burn scar reconstruction with tissue expansion at Hadassah Medical Center between January 2003 and July 2012. The data included patient age, anatomical site of expansion, number of procedures, and associated complications. The outcomes of the above-mentioned populations were also compared with those in a control group of patients undergoing reconstruction with tissue expansion for indications other than burn scars. 

Results: Sixty-seven tissue expansion procedures were carried out in 50 patients, 42 in the pediatric population (< 16 years of age) and 25 in the adult population. Complications were observed in 10 of the 42 pediatric procedures (23.8%) and in 3 of the 25 adult procedures (12%). This difference was found to be statistically significant. When the complication rate for each population was compared to its control group (tissue expansion for indications other than burn scar reconstruction, such as reconstruction for motor vehicle accident scarring, congenital nevi, or vascular malformations), no statistically significant difference was found between them (complication rates 19.8% and 12.5%, respectively). Furthermore, there was no statistically significant difference in complication rates between the different anatomical areas of expansion within both populations undergoing burn scar reconstruction. Most of the complicated cases completed successful reconstruction.

Conclusions: Tissue expansion is a useful surgical tool in post-burn scar reconstruction, both in the adult and pediatric populations and in all anatomic sites, despite consistently high complication rates, especially in the pediatric population. This complication rate is not higher than in patients undergoing tissue expansion for indications other than burn scar reconstruction. 

Yuval Krieger MD, Eldad Silberstein MD, Yaron Shoham MD and Alexander Bogdanov-Berezovsky MD
August 2009
L. Dotan, M. Icekson, R. Yanko-Arzi, A. Ofek, R. Neuman and A. Margulis

Background: Tissue expansion is a well-recognized technique for reconstructing a wide variety of skin and soft tissue defects. Its application in the pediatric population has enabled the plastic surgeon to achieve functional and aesthetic goals that were previously unobtainable.

Objectives: To review the use of tissue expansion in the pediatric population, with particular emphasis on indication, operative technique, regional considerations and how to avoid complications.

Methods: We retrospectively reviewed data on 103 expanded flap reconstructions performed in 41 pediatric patients during the period 2003–2006. Tissue expanders were placed on a subcutaneous plane above the fascia and inflated weekly. The expanded skin was used as a transposition flap or a full thickness skin graft for the reconstruction of the involved area. Forty-three tissue expanders were inserted to the head and neck in 21 patients, 45 were inserted to the trunk in 13 patients and 15 were inserted to the groin and lower extremity in 8 patients. Twenty-eight patients had one round of tissue expansion, while 13 patients had two to six rounds. A plastic surgeon, medical student and a lawyer reviewed the patients' photographs and evaluated their aesthetic outcome:

Results: Eighty-six percent of the head and neck reconstructions and 40% of the trunk and extremity reconstructions were graded as having excellent aesthetic outcome, and 11% of the head and neck reconstructions and 37% of the trunk and extremity reconstructions were graded with good aesthetic outcome. The remaining patients were graded with moderate outcome. None of our patients was graded as poor aesthetic outcome. Complications included infection in 6 patients (6%), extrusion in 3 (3%), hematoma in 2 (2%), flap ischemia in one patient (1%), and expander perforation after percutaneous stabbing in one patient (1%).

Conclusions: Tissue expansion is an efficient and valuable technique for reconstruction of large skin lesions and scars.

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