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עמוד בית
Sat, 22.06.24

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December 2023
Dana Brin MD, Vera Sorin MD, Noam Tau MD, Matan Kraus MD, Tom Sonin MD, Yiftach Barash MD, Evgeni Druskin MD, Eyal Klang MD, Christine Dan-Lantsman MD, Daniel Raskin MD, Elena Bekker MD, Shai Shrot MD, Amit Gutkind PhD, Olga Shouchat MD, Edith M. Marom MD, Michal M. Amitai MD

In this study, we analyzed computed tomography (CT) radiological findings from trauma treated at a single hospital in the aftermath of the terror attack in Israel on 7 October 2023. The study includes images from 34 consecutive patients, consisting of 33 males and 1 female, ranging in age from 19 to 68 years. The majority of these patients underwent both chest-abdominal-pelvic (76%) and head and neck CT scans (64.7%). Key findings highlight a high incidence of head and neck injuries (55.9%), chest trauma (44.1%), and various injuries such as soft tissue lacerations (100%), fractures particularly skull fractures at 32.4%, and brain hemorrhages (23.5%). The limitations of this study include its single-center scope and the focus on stable patients, which may bias the representation of injury types. This case series provides critical insights into the radiological impacts of large-scale terror events, emphasizing the importance of comprehensive preparedness and research in the field of mass-casualty incident response.

August 2022
Daphna Landau Prat MD, Shira Sandbank MD, Tal Davidy MD, Ofira Zloto MD, and Guy J. Ben Simon MD

Background: Upper eyelid blepharoplasty surgery is one of the most common plastic surgeries. Khat is used topically to reduce tissue edema.

Objectives: To evaluate the effect of topical khat administration after eyelid surgery on postoperative healing.

Methods: Our prospective comparative study included 24 patients who underwent upper eyelid blepharoplasty or ptosis surgery between 2019 and 2020. Patients were randomly assigned to 48 hours of cold dressing with frozen khat leaves and frozen peas dressing (common practice). Postoperative photographs of the eyes were evaluated for the degree of ecchymosis and edema on postoperative days (PODs) 1, 3, and 7 by three blinded observers. Measures included tissue swelling and hemorrhage on PODs 1, 3, and 7.

Results: The mean age of the cohort was 67 ± 7 years; 17 females (71%). Khat application was associated with lower postoperative ecchymosis at each time point. Females had lower levels of postoperative ecchymosis on POD 7 (P = 0.07). Eyelid edema was more pronounced in the khat group on PODs 1 and 3, but this was reversed on POD 7. There was good agreement among all three observers in grading ecchymosis and edema (P < 0.001).

Conclusions: The use of khat was associated with less tissue ecchymosis after oculoplastic surgery, although this was not statistically significant even following sub-population analysis. The outcome can be attributed to the active ingredients of cathinone and cathine, which cause vasoconstriction and lipolysis, and to the anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidative flavonoids and phenolic compounds. These encouraging preliminary findings warrant additional studies on a biochemical/cellular level.

February 2022
Yaron Rudnicki MD, Hagai Soback MD, and Mahajna Ahmad MD

Background: Achieving laparoscopic competency is challenging. Common laparoscopic simulators usually fall short in achieving true simulation.

Objective: To present a live porcine model laparoscopic skills laboratory for training general surgery residents.

Methods: An in vivo porcine laparoscopic model course was developed to simulate seven different laparoscopic procedures and seven laparoscopic skills for trainees under the tutelage of laparoscopic specialists.

Results: A total of 98 surgical trainees from 19 training programs underwent a full-day course from September 2017 to July 2020. Each program consisted of four trainees and two faculty members. In total, 175 laparoscopic procedures were performed. Trainees reported that the course improved their ability to perform in the operating room.

Conclusions: Using a laparoscopic porcine model in a guided didactic course performing complete common laparoscopic procedures in simulated operating room surroundings was beneficial for surgical trainees. The porcine model mimics human abdominal anatomy and allows trainees to increase their comfort level in performing such procedures.

December 2020
Tiberiu R. Shulimzon MD, Shir Giladi BSc, and Meital Zilberman PhD

Background: Chronic lung diseases, especially emphysema and pulmonary fibrosis, are the third leading cause of mortality worldwide. Their treatment includes symptom alleviation, slowing of the disease progression, and ultimately organ transplant. Regenerative medicine represents an attractive alternative.

Objectives: To develop a dual approach to lung therapy by engineering a platform dedicated to both remodeling pulmonary architecture (bronchoscopic lung volume reduction) and regeneration of lost respiratory tissue (scaffold).

Methods: The authors developed a hydrogel scaffold based on the natural polymers gelatin and alginate. The unique physical properties allow its injection through long catheters that pass through the working channel of a bronchoscope. The scaffold might reach the diseased area; thus, serving a dual purpose: remodeling the lung architecture as a lung volume reduction material and developing a platform for tissue regeneration to allow for cell or organoid implant.

Results: The authors’ novel hydrogel scaffold can be injected through long catheters, exhibiting the physical and mechanical properties necessary for the dual treatment objectives. Its biocompatibility was analyzed on human fibroblasts and mouse mesenchymal cells. Cells injected with the scaffold through long narrow catheters exhibited at least 70% viability up to 7 days.

Conclusions: The catheter-injectable gelatin-alginate hydrogel represents a new concept, which combines tissue engineering with minimal invasive procedure. It is an inexpensive and convenient to use alternative to other types of suggested scaffolds for lung tissue engineering. This novel concept may be used for additional clinical applications in regenerative medicine.

July 2019
Laura Andreoli MD PhD, Antía García-Fernández MD, Maria Chiara Gerardi MD and Angela Tincani MD

Rheumatic diseases commonly affect women of childbearing age, when women may be contemplating pregnancy or they discover an unplanned pregnancy. Therefore, specific issues about pregnancy planning and management are commonly encountered in patients during these times. Knowledge of the effect of pregnancy on disease activity is important for counseling. This review summarizes recent data on the course of different rheumatic diseases during pregnancy and the postpartum period. Rheumatoid arthritis and systemic lupus erythematosus are the most commonly investigated diseases. Data are increasing about spondyloarthritis. Sparse data are available for other rheumatic diseases. Despite the differences in these diseases and the various courses these disease take during pregnancy, a common feature is that active maternal disease in the months prior to conception increases the risk of flares during pregnancy, which in turn can lead to adverse pregnancy outcomes. Therefore, maternal and fetal health can be optimized if conception is planned when disease is inactive so that a treatment regimen can be maintained throughout pregnancy.

October 2018
Sivan Shamai MD and Ofer Merimsky MD

Background: Trabectedin is a marine-derived chemotherapy, which has received U.S. Food and Drug Administration approval for use in anthracycline-resistant advanced soft tissue sarcoma (STS), especially liposarcoma and leiomyosarcoma (L-sarcomas).

Objectives: To describe our 10 year real-life experience with trabectedin regarding safety and efficacy in a cohort of 86 patients.

Methods: In our study cohort, 46.51% were diagnosed with liposarcoma and 43.02% with leiomyosarcoma. A total of 703 cycles of trabectedin were given, with a median of five cycles per patient (range 1–59). Median overall survival was 13.5 months for the whole cohort, 11 months for liposarcoma patients (range 1–63), and 15 months for leiomyosarcoma patients (range 1–35).

Results: There was no statistically significant difference in progression free survival when stratified according to previous treatment lines given. Trabectedin exhibited a favorable safety profile, with only 22% requiring dose reductions. Grade 3 and higher toxicity was noted in 25% of the patients, mostly due to myelosuppression. There were no treatment-related deaths.

Conclusions: Trabectedin is a safe and effective drug for treating advanced STS. Our results reflect real-life data with patients receiving the drug as a third and even fourth line of treatment, or with a suboptimal performance status, yet achieving impressive clinical benefit rates and survival.

July 2018
Asaf Shemer B.Med.Sc, Liron Talmi MD, Dror S. Shouval MD, Gil Har-Zahav MD and Raz Somech MD PhD
June 2018
Sagit Meshulam-Derazon MD, Tamir Shay MD, Sivan Lewis and Neta Adler MD

Background: One-stage direct-to-implant post-mastectomy breast reconstruction has been gaining popularity over the traditional two-stage/tissue-expander approach.

Objectives: To evaluate the outcome of the two post-mastectomy breast reconstruction procedures in terms of patient satisfaction.

Methods: Clinical data were collected by file review for patients who underwent mastectomy with immediate breast reconstruction at two tertiary medical centers in 2010–2013. Patients were asked to complete the BREAST-Q instrument, sent to them by post with a self-addressed, stamped, return envelope. Scores were compared by type of reconstruction performed.

Results: Of the 92 patients who received the questionnaire, 59 responded: 39 had one-stage breast reconstruction and 20 underwent two-stage reconstruction. The two-stage reconstruction group was significantly older, had more background diseases, and were followed for a longer period. The one-stage reconstruction group had a higher proportion of BRCA mutation carriers. There was no significant between-group difference in postoperative complications. Mean BREAST-Q scores were similar in the two groups for all dimensions except satisfaction with information, which was higher in the patients after one-stage reconstruction. Women with more background diseases had better sexual well-being, and married women had better psychological well-being. Breast satisfaction was lower among patients treated with radiation and higher among patients with bilateral reconstruction; the latter subgroup also had higher physical well-being. Complications did not affect satisfaction.

Conclusions: Patients were equally satisfied with the outcome of one- and two-stage breast reconstruction. The choice of technique should be made on a case-by-case basis. Cost analyses are needed to construct a decision-making algorithm.

November 2017
Einat Slonimsky MD, Tammar Kushnir PhD, Assaf Kadar MD, Aharon Menahem MD, Alon Grundshtein MD, Steven Velekes MD, Merav Lidar MD, Shmuel Dekel MD and Iris Eshed MD

Background: Metal-on-metal total hip prostheses (MoM-THR) have been shown to produce hypersensitivity reactions and fluid collection (pseudotumor) by the hip as well as high blood metal ions levels (BMILs).

Objectives: To evaluate the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) in selected body tissues around the hip of patients who underwent MoM hip replacement and to correlate to BMILs.

Methods: Sixty-one MRI hip examinations in 54 post-MoM-THR patients (18 males, 36 females, mean age 65 years) were retrospectively evaluated independently by two readers. The mean S/N ratio in a region of interest was calculated for periprosthetic pseudotumor collection (PPC), the bladder, fat, and muscle on axial T1w, FSE-T2w, and short tau inversion recovery (STIR) sequences on the same location. BMILs were retrieved from patient files.

Results: PPC was detected in 32 patients (52%) with an average volume of 82.48 mm3. BMIL did not correlate with the presence of PPCs but positively correlated with the PPC's volume. A trend for positive correlation was found between BMILs and S/N levels of STIR images for muscle and bladder as well as for PPC and cobalt levels. A trend for correlation was also seen between BMIL with PPC's T1 w S/N.

Conclusions: Alteration of MRI S/N for different hip tissues showed a tendency for correlation with BMILs, possibly suggesting that metal deposition occurs in the PPC as well as in the surrounding tissues and bladder.

June 2017
Sergio Susmallian MD, David Goitein MD, Royi Barnea PhD and Asnat Raziel MD

Background: Leakage from the staple line is the most serious complication encountered after sleeve gastrectomy, occurring in 2.4% of surgeries. The use of inappropriately sized staplers, because of variability in stomach wall thickness, is a major cause of leakage.

Objectives: To measure stomach wall thickness across different stomach zones to identify variables correlating with thickness.

Methods: The study comprised 100 patients (52 females). Stomach wall thickness was measured immediately after surgery using a digital caliper at the antrum, body, and fundus. Results were correlated with body mass index (BMI), age, gender, and pre-surgical diagnosis of diabetes, hypertension, hyperlipidemia and fatty liver.

Results: Stomach thickness was found to be 5.1 ± 0.6 mm at the antrum, 4.1 ± 0.6 mm at the body, and 2. 6 ± 0.5 mm at the fundus. No correlation was found between stomach wall thickness and BMI, gender, or co-morbidities. 

Conclusions: Stomach wall thickness increases gradually from the fundus toward the antrum. Application of the correct staple height during sleeve gastrectomy is important and may, theoretically, prevent leaks. Staplers should be chosen according to the thickness of the tissue.

 

May 2017
Michael Findler MD, Jeremy Molad MD, Natan M Bornstein MD and Eitan Auriel MD MSc

Background: Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common arrhythmia and a common cause of ischemic stroke. Stroke patients with AF have been shown to have a poorer neurological outcome than stroke patients without AF.

Objectives: To determine the impact of pre-existing AF on residual degree of disability in patients treated with IV thrombolysis.

Methods: In this case-control study, data of 214 stroke patients (63 with AF and 151 without AF) were collected from the National Acute Stroke Israeli Registry, a nationwide quadrennial stroke database. Stroke severity and outcome were compared using the National Institute of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) on admission and the modified Rankin Scale (mRS) on admission and discharge. Demographics and stroke characteristics were also compared between the groups.

Results: Stroke severity, as determined by NIHSS at admission, was higher in the AF group than the non-AF. In the group of patients who were treated with intravenous tissue plasminogen activator (tPA), more patients had favorable outcomes (mRS = 0–1 on discharge) in the non-AF group than in the AF group (P = 0.058, odds ratio = 2.217, confidence interval 0.973 to 5.05).

Conclusions: Our study suggests worse outcome in thrombolized patients with AF compared to non-AF stroke patients. Therefore, AF itself can be a poor prognostic factor for tPA sensitivity regarding the chance of revascularization and recovery after intravenous tPA.

February 2017
Alexander Margulis MD, Allan Billig MD, Jhonatan Elia MD, Yair Shachar MD and Neta Adler MD

Background: Burn scar reconstruction is extremely challenging, even for the most proficient reconstructive surgeon. Within the arsenal of tools at the plastic surgeon’s disposal, tissue expansion provides an efficient modality for reconstruction despite the reported complication rates. 

Objectives: To critically review our experience with tissue expansion for burn scar reconstruction, comparing particularly the adult and pediatric populations.

Methods: We conducted a retrospective study of the outcomes of patients who underwent burn scar reconstruction with tissue expansion at Hadassah Medical Center between January 2003 and July 2012. The data included patient age, anatomical site of expansion, number of procedures, and associated complications. The outcomes of the above-mentioned populations were also compared with those in a control group of patients undergoing reconstruction with tissue expansion for indications other than burn scars. 

Results: Sixty-seven tissue expansion procedures were carried out in 50 patients, 42 in the pediatric population (< 16 years of age) and 25 in the adult population. Complications were observed in 10 of the 42 pediatric procedures (23.8%) and in 3 of the 25 adult procedures (12%). This difference was found to be statistically significant. When the complication rate for each population was compared to its control group (tissue expansion for indications other than burn scar reconstruction, such as reconstruction for motor vehicle accident scarring, congenital nevi, or vascular malformations), no statistically significant difference was found between them (complication rates 19.8% and 12.5%, respectively). Furthermore, there was no statistically significant difference in complication rates between the different anatomical areas of expansion within both populations undergoing burn scar reconstruction. Most of the complicated cases completed successful reconstruction.

Conclusions: Tissue expansion is a useful surgical tool in post-burn scar reconstruction, both in the adult and pediatric populations and in all anatomic sites, despite consistently high complication rates, especially in the pediatric population. This complication rate is not higher than in patients undergoing tissue expansion for indications other than burn scar reconstruction. 

Yuval Krieger MD, Eldad Silberstein MD, Yaron Shoham MD and Alexander Bogdanov-Berezovsky MD
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