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עמוד בית
Sun, 25.02.24

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December 2006
N. Hod, G. Fire, I. Cohen, M. Somekh and T. Horne
January 2004
N. Hod, Z Maizlin, S. Strauss and T. Horne

Background: Since the early 1970s testicular scintigraphy has been used to diagnose the cause of acute scrotal pain. The advent of Doppler sonography further enhances diagnosis by  providing simultaneous real-time scrotal imaging with superimposed testicular blood flow information.

Objectives: To assess the diagnostic value of Doppler sonography in patients with acute scrotal pain and scintigraphic findings suggestive of testicular torsion.

Methods: Seventy-five patients with acute scrotal pain underwent testicular scintigraphy and Doppler sonography. All patients who had scintigraphic findings suggestive of testicular torsion were included in the study and their files were retrospectively reviewed.

Results: Twenty-seven patients had scintigraphic findings suggestive of testicular torsion. Radionuclide scintigraphy accurately detected all cases of testicular torsion. However, abscess, hematoma, hydrocele and other conditions simulated testicular torsion on scintigraphy, lowering the test specificity. These pathologies were clarified by Doppler sonography that was 95% specific and 86% sensitive for testicular torsion.

Conclusions: Doppler sonography should be used as the first-line modality in the evaluation of patients with suspected testicular torsion. Scintigraphy should be performed only in certain settings of equivocal sonographic findings to prevent false negative sonographic diagnosis.
 

November 2003
A. Halevy, A. Stepanasky, Z. Halpern, I. Wasserman, Z. Chen-Levy, S. Pytlovich, O. Marcus, A. Mor, P. Hagag, T. Horne, S. Polypodi and J. Sandbank

Background: Among the various new technologies in the field of parathyroid surgery are intraoperative quick parathormone measurements.

Objectives: To evaluate the contribution of QPTH[1] measurements during parathyroidectomy to the achievement of higher success rates. 

Methods: QPTH assay using Immulite Turbo Intact PTH[2] was measured in 32 patients undergoing parathyroidectomy: 30 for primary and 2 for secondary hyperparathyroidism.  QPTH levels were measured at time 0 minutes (before incision) and at 10, 20, and 30 minutes after excision of the hyperfunctioning gland.  Only a drop of 60% or more from the 0’ level was considered to be a positive result.

Results: The mean QPTH level at time 0’ for PHPT[3] patients was 38.12 ± 25.15 pmol/L (range 9.1–118 pmol/L).  At 10 minutes post-excision of the hyperfunctioning gland (or glands), QPTH dropped by a mean of 73.80% to 9.89 ± 18.78 pmol/L. 

Conclusions: Intraoperative QPTH level measurement is helpful in parathyroid surgery.  A drop of 60% or more from 0’ level indicates a successful procedure, and further exploration should be avoided.






[1] QPTH = quick parathormone



[2] PTH = parathormone



[3] PHPT = primary hyperparathyroidism


November 2001
Baruch Klin, MD, Lev Zlotkevich, MD, Tifha Horne, MD, Yigal Efrati, MD, Francis Serour, MD and Gad Lotan, MD

Background: Acute scrotal pain in children presents a major diagnostic and therapeutic challenge. Epididymitis has been considered uncommon in childhood. The clinical spectrum and therapeutic policy of the acute scrotum in children is continually being reassessed.

Objectives: To determine whether there has been an increase in the incidence of epididymitis in children and to advocate a more selective surgical approach to the acute scrotum.

Methods: We conducted a retrospective review of 65 children admitted to our department of pediatric surgery with the diagnosis of acute scrotum during a 5 year period.

Results: Of the 65 children admitted with the diagnosis of acute scrotum, epididymitis was diagnosed in 42 (64.6%). The remaining cases included torsion of the testis in 12 patients (18.5%), torsion of the appendix testis in 5 (7.7%), scrotal pain and minimal physical findings in 4 (6.1%), and scrotal hematoma and idiopathic scrotal edema in one patient each. Doppler ultrasound of the groin, color Doppler ultrasound of the testis and testicular nuclide scintigraphy (Tc-99m scan) examinations were performed on 49, 30 and 57 occasions, respectively; the Tc-99m scan was the most effective tool. All the patients with epididymitis were diagnosed before surgical intervention and were treated conservatively.

Conclusions: We observed an increasing frequency of epididymitis in children admitted with the diagnosis of acute scrotum.
 

June 2001
Alex Kessler, MD, Ephraim Eviatar, MD, Judith Lapinsky, MD, Tifha Horne, MD, Nathan Shlamkovitch, MD and Shmuel Segal, MD
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