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עמוד בית
Fri, 31.05.24

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November 2015
Ofer Levy MD, Mirit Amit-Vazina MD, Refael Segal MD and Moshe Tishler MD

Background: Pain, fatigue and functional disability are common key outcomes in most rheumatologic disorders. While many studies have assessed the outcomes of specific disease states, few have compared the outcomes of various rheumatic diseases.

Objectives: To assess how the intensity and rating of pain, fatigue and functional disability vary among groups of patients with various rheumatic disorders receiving standard care. 

Methods: In a cross-sectional study conducted in a hospital-based rheumatology unit, standard clinical and laboratory data were obtained and all patients filled out questionnaires on pain, fatigue and daily function. The analysis concentrated on visual analogue scales (VAS) using specific statistical methods.

Results: A total of 618 visits of 383 patients with inflammatory as well as non-inflammatory rheumatic disorders were analyzed. Fibromyalgia patients had significantly higher VAS scores compared to all other groups. On the other hand, patients with polymyalgia rheumatica demonstrated significantly lower VAS scores compared to all other groups of patients. Patients with psoriatic arthritis also demonstrated relatively low VAS scores. VAS scores were lower in patients with inflammatory disorders as compared to patients with non-inflammatory disorders.

Conclusions: Our results suggest a spectrum of outcome intensity in various rheumatic disorders receiving standard care, ranging from fibromyalgia patients who report distinctive severity to patients with inflammatory disorders who are doing relatively well as compared to patients with non-inflammatory disorders. The findings emphasize the need to explore the underlying mechanisms of pain and fatigue in patients with non-inflammatory rheumatic disorders. 

 

February 2013
T. Steinberg, I. Tamir, S. Zimmerman-Brenner, M. Friling and A. Apter
 Background:  Tic disorders are common causes of morbidity in Israel but their prevalence in this country needs further study.

Objectives: To assess the prevalence of mental disorders in Israeli youth including tic disorders, as part of the Israel Survey of Mental Health among Adolescents (ISMEHA).

Methods: The ISMEHA was conducted in a representative sample of 957 adolescents aged 14–17 and their mothers during 2004–2005. We interviewed the adolescents and their mothers in their homes and collected demographic information about the use of services. We also administered a psychiatric interview, the Development and Well-Being Assessment inventory (DAWBA), which included a question on tic disorder. The prevalence of tic disorders was calculated based on the adolescents’ and maternal reports. The relationships among demographic data, comorbidity rates, help-seeking behaviors and tic disorder are presented.

Results: The prevalence of tics was 1.3% according to maternal reports and 4.4% according to adolescents’ reports. The prevalence correlated with externalizing disorders and learning disabilities A higher prevalence of tics was found in the Arab population compared with Jewish adolescents

Conclusions: The prevalence of tic disorders in Israel, as measured by a direct question in this epidemiological study, and associated comorbidities concurs with previous reports. The complexities of prevalence estimations, comorbidities, demographic correlates, and help-seeking behaviors are discussed.

January 2002
Haim Shirin MD, Yaron Davidovitz MD, Yona Avni MD, Paulina Petchenko MD, Zipora Krepel MSc, Rafael Bruck MD and Dina Meytes MD

Background: Epidemiological studies in different parts of the world have revealed controversial results on the association between hepatitis C virus infection and non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma. This discrepancy suggests that HCV[1] lymphotropism or its effect on host lymphocytes may be influenced by regional and racial factors, as well as by genomic variations.

Objective: To determine the prevalence of HCV infection in patients with lymphoproliferative disorders diagnosed and treated in our institute in Israel.

Methods: A total of 212 consecutive patients (95 males and 117 females) treated in our hematology outpatient clinic between August 1997 and September 1999 was screened for anti-HCV antibodies and hepatitis B surface antigen. HCV infection was confirmed by the presence of HCV RNA in the serum. The prevalence of HCV in patients with lymphoproliferative disorders was compared to a control group of patients with myeloproliferative disorders and myelodysplastic syndromes.

Results: HCV infection was more prevalent in the group of LPD[2] patients than in the control group, but this finding was not statistically significant. The prevalence of HCV among LPD patients was 7.8%, while that in the group with myeloproliferative and myelodysplastic disorders was 1.19% and in the general population 0.64%. Among the different classes of LPD, a significant association with HCV infection was established only in patients with diffuse large B cell lymphoma. Furthermore, HCV infection was significantly more prevalent than HBV infection in the LPD group, but not in the myeloproliferative and myelodysplastic disorders group.

Conclusions: Our finding of a significant association between HCV infection and diffuse large B cell lymphoma leads us to suggest that anti-HCV antibodies be performed routinely in such subjects.  

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 [1]LPD = lymphoproliferative disorders

[2] HCV = hepatitis C virus

September 2000
Joel Zlotogora, MD, PhD and Alex Leventhal, MD, MPH

The screening program in Israel for Tay-Sachs disease has proven very successful, giving Jewish couples a choice not to have affected children. The technology of carrier detection is now possible in several other severe genetic diseases that are relatively frequent among Jews. Due to the current confusion, a policy is needed to determine how the TSD screening program should be continued in the Israeli Jewish population. We propose that such a screening program include only mutations agreed by consensus as causing a disease severe enough to warrant the possibility of therapeutic abortion. We also propose that general screening include only mutations that are relatively frequent, taking into account the carrier frequencies in the Israeli Jewish population.

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