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עמוד בית
Sun, 03.03.24

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June 2008
D. Sharif, G. Rofe, A. Sharif-Rasslan, E. Goldhammer, N. Makhoul, A. Shefer, A. Hassan, S. Rauchfleisch and U. Rosenschein

Background The temporal behavior of the coronary microcirculation in acute myocardial infarction may affect outcome. Diastolic deceleration time and early systolic flow reversal derived from coronary artery blood flow velocity patterns reflect microcirculatory function.

Objectives To assess left anterior descending coronary artery flow velocity patterns using Doppler transthoracic echocardiography after primary percutaneous coronary intervention, in patients with anterior AMI[1].

Methods Patterns of flow velocity patterns of the LAD[2] were obtained using transthoracic echocardiography-Doppler in 31 consecutive patients who presented with anterior AMI. Measurements were done at 6 hours, 36–48 hours, and 5 days after successful PPCI[3]. Measurements of DDT[4] and pressure half times (Pt½), as well as observation for ESFR[5] were performed.

Results In the first 2 days following PPCI, the average DDT, 600 ± 340 msec, were shorter than on day 5, 807 ± 332 msec (P < 0.012). FVP[6] in the first 2 days were dynamic and bidirectional: from short DDT (< 600 msec) to long DDT (> 600 msec) and vice versa. On day 5 most DDTs became longer. Pt½ at 6 hours was not different than at day 2 (174 ± 96 vs. 193 ± 99 msec, P = NS) and became longer on day 5 (235 ± 98 msec, p = 0.012). Bidirectional patterns were also observed in the ESFR in 6 patients (19%) at baseline, in 4 (13%) at 36 hours, and in 2 (6.5%) on day 5 after PPCI.






[1] AMI = acute myocardial infarction

[2] LAD = left anterior descending

[3] PPCI = primary percutaneous coronary intervention

[4] DDT = diastolic deceleration time

[5] ESFR = early systolic flow reversal  

[6] FVP = flow velocity pattern


March 2002
Edward G. Abinader, MD FRCPI, Dawod Sharif, MD, Arie Shefer, MD and Johanan Naschitz, MD

Background: Long-term follow-up in apical hypertrophic cardiomyopathy is rare.

Objective: To study the natural history of the disease.

Methods: We followed 11 patients, 5 women and 6 men, for 5-20 years.

Results: At presentation all 11 patients had typical features of apical hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, with dyspnea in 3 and chest pains in 8, of whom 5 were typical of angina and 3 had myocardial infarction. R-wave voltage and T-wave negativity progressively decreased in magnitude at serial electrocardiograms in four patients. Perfusion defects were detected on thallium myocardial scintigraphy in three, increased apical uptake in two, and normal in one patient. Apical aneurysm with normal coronary arteries developed in a patient who had sustained ventricular tachycardia. All of the 10 catheterized patients had normal coronaries except for one with significant left anterior descending artery stenosis and another with a minor lesion. Symptomatic sustained ventricular tachycardia was found in two patients, one of whom required the implantation of an internal cardioverter-defibrillator.

Conclusions: Apical hypertrophic cardiomyopathy may develop morphologic and electrocardiographic changes with life-threatening arrhythmias necessitating close follow-up and treatment.

August 2000
Tzipora C. Falik-Zaccai MD, Elena Shachak MSc, Devora Abeliovitch PhD, Israela Lerer MSc, Ruth Shefer MD, Rivka Carmi MD, Liat Ries MSc, Moshe Friedman MD, Mordechai Shohat MD and Zvi Borochowitz MD

Background: Achondroplasia is the most frequent form of disproportionate short stature, characterized by rhizomelic shortening of the limbs. This disorder is inherited as an autosomal dominant trait, although most of the cases are sporadic, a result of a de novo mutation. A recurrent glycine to arginine mutation at codon 380 (G380R) in the transmembrane domain of the fibroblast growth factor receptor 3 gene was found to cause achondroplasia among different populations. This is most uncommon in other autosomal dominant genetic diseases.

Objectives: To determine whether this mutation is also common among Jewish patients from diverse ethnic groups and among the Arab population in Israel.

Methods: We examined the G380R mutation (G>A and G>C transition) and the mutation G375C (G>T transition at codon 375) in 31 sporadic patients and in one family diagnosed clinically to have achondroplasia.

Results: We found the G>A transition at codon 380 in 30 of our patients and the G>C transition in one patient. We were not able to detect any of the three mutations in two patients with an atypical form of achondroplasia.

Conclusions: Our results further support the unusual observation that nucleotide 1138 of the FGFR3 gene is the most mutable nucleotide discovered to date across different populations.

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FGFR3 = fibroblast growth factor receptor 3

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