• IMA sites
  • IMAJ services
  • IMA journals
  • Follow us
  • Alternate Text Alternate Text
עמוד בית
Fri, 01.03.24

Search results


June 2006
A. Ekka-Zohar, Y. Zitser-Gurevich, M. Mandel, I. Weiss-Salz, S. Nir, E. Mor, R. Nakash, H. Merhav, R. Bruck and E. Simchen
Background: There is a dearth of organs for liver transplantation in Israel. Enhancing our understanding of factors affecting graft survival in this country could help optimize the results of the transplant operation.




Objectives: To report 3 years national experience with orthotopic liver transplantation, and to evaluate patient and perioperative risk factors that could affect 1 year graft survival.

Methods: The study related to all 124 isolated adult liver transplantations performed in Israel between October 1997 and October 2000. Data were abstracted from the medical records. One-year graft survival was described using the Kaplan-Meier survival curve and three multivariate logistic regression models were performed: one with preoperative case-mix factors alone, and the other two with the addition of donor and operative factors respectively.

Results: Of the 124 liver transplantations performed, 32 failed (25.8%). The 1 year survival was lower than rates reported from both the United States and Europe, but the difference was not significant. Of the preoperative risk factors, recipient age ≥ 60 years, critical condition prior to surgery, high serum bilirubin and serum hemoglobin ≤ 10 g/dl were independently associated with graft failure, adjusting for all the other factors that entered the logistic regression equation. Extending the model to include donor and operative factors raised the C-statistic from 0.79 to 0.87. Donor age ≥ 40, cold ischemic time > 10 hours and a prolonged operation (> 10 hours) were the additional predictors for graft survival. A MELD score of over 18 was associated with a sixfold increased risk for graft failure (odds ratio = 6.5, P = 0.001).

Conclusions: Graft survival in Israel is slightly lower than that reported from the U.S. and Europe. Adding donor and operative factors to recipient characteristics significantly increased our understanding of 1 year survival of liver grafts.

January 2002
Haim Shirin MD, Yaron Davidovitz MD, Yona Avni MD, Paulina Petchenko MD, Zipora Krepel MSc, Rafael Bruck MD and Dina Meytes MD

Background: Epidemiological studies in different parts of the world have revealed controversial results on the association between hepatitis C virus infection and non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma. This discrepancy suggests that HCV[1] lymphotropism or its effect on host lymphocytes may be influenced by regional and racial factors, as well as by genomic variations.

Objective: To determine the prevalence of HCV infection in patients with lymphoproliferative disorders diagnosed and treated in our institute in Israel.

Methods: A total of 212 consecutive patients (95 males and 117 females) treated in our hematology outpatient clinic between August 1997 and September 1999 was screened for anti-HCV antibodies and hepatitis B surface antigen. HCV infection was confirmed by the presence of HCV RNA in the serum. The prevalence of HCV in patients with lymphoproliferative disorders was compared to a control group of patients with myeloproliferative disorders and myelodysplastic syndromes.

Results: HCV infection was more prevalent in the group of LPD[2] patients than in the control group, but this finding was not statistically significant. The prevalence of HCV among LPD patients was 7.8%, while that in the group with myeloproliferative and myelodysplastic disorders was 1.19% and in the general population 0.64%. Among the different classes of LPD, a significant association with HCV infection was established only in patients with diffuse large B cell lymphoma. Furthermore, HCV infection was significantly more prevalent than HBV infection in the LPD group, but not in the myeloproliferative and myelodysplastic disorders group.

Conclusions: Our finding of a significant association between HCV infection and diffuse large B cell lymphoma leads us to suggest that anti-HCV antibodies be performed routinely in such subjects.  

________________________

 [1]LPD = lymphoproliferative disorders

[2] HCV = hepatitis C virus

September 2001
Gabriel Kenet, MD, Joram Wardi, MD, Yona Avni, MD, Hussein Aeed, PhD, Haim Shirin, MD, Liliana Zaidel, MD, Rami Hershkovitz, MD and Rafael Bruck, MD

Background: Rectal administration of iodoacetamide induces colitis by blocking sulphhydryl groups and generating inflammatory mediators. Thalidomide, a non-barbiturate hyp­notic, also has an anti-inflammatory effect, presumably by suppressing the production of tumor necrosis factor alpha. In patients with Crohn’s disease, neutralization or suppression of TNFá reduces inflammation.

Objectives: To evaluate the effects of thalidomide in a model of experimental colitis.

Methods: Colitis was induced in rats by intracolonic administration of 3% iodoacetamide. In the treatment group, thalidomide 50 mg/kg was given daily by gavage and continued for 7 days until the rats were sacrificed. Their colons were then processed for wet weight, lesion area, weight of mucosal scraping, myeloperoxidase activity and histology. Serum levels of TNF were determined.

Results: Colonic wet weight, lesion area, myeloperoxidase activity and serum levels of TNFá were significantly lower (P<0.05) in the treatment group (iodoacetamide + thalido­mide) than the control group (iodoacetamide only). Histologi­cally, colonic inflammation in the treated group was markedly decreased.

Conclusions: Thalidomide effectively decreases colitis induced by iodoacetamide. The mechanism is probably associated with inhibition of TNFá, and should be further studied.
 

February 2001
Joram Wardi, MD, Ram Reifen, MD, Hussein Aeed, PhD, Liliana Zadel, MD, Yona Avni, MD and Rafael Bruck, MD

Objective: To study whether retinolpalmitate, beta-car­otene or lycopene could prevent liver cirrhosis induced by thioacetamide in rats.

Methods: In the control group liver cirrhosis was induced in male Wistar rats by intraperitoneal injections of TAA 200 mg/ kg for 12 weeks. The three study groups received in addition to TM either beta-carotene, lycopene or retinolpalmitate by gavage through an orogastric tube. Histopathological analysis and determination of the hydroxyproline contents of the livers were performed at the end of the protocol.

Results: Rats treated with beta-carotene and TAA had lower histopathologic scores and reduced levels of hepatic hydroxyproline (P= 0.02) than those treated by TAA alone. A trend of decreased fibrosis was observed in the rats treated with lycopene and TAA although this lacked statistical significance.

Conclusions: Beta-carotene attenuated liver cirrhosis induced by TAA in rats. The mechanism may be related to effects on hepatic stellate cells or to scavenging of free radicals by beta-carotene. Retinolpalmitate and lycopen had no significant beneficial effect.

October 1999
Peretz Weiss MD, Meir Mouallem MD, Rafael Bruck MD, David Hassin MD, Amir Tanay MD, Chaim M. Brickman MD, Zvi Farfel MD and Simon Bar-Meir MD
 Background: Nimesulide is a relatively new non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug that is gaining popularity in many countries because it is a selective cyclooxygenase 2 inhibitor. Occasionally, treatment is associated with mild elevation of liver enzymes, which return to normal upon discontinuation of the drug. Several cases of nimesulide-induced symptomatic hepatitis were also recently reported, but these patients all recovered.

Objectives: To report the characteristics of liver injury induced by nimesulide.

Patients and Methods: We report retrospectively six patients, five of them females with a median age of 59 years, whose aminotransferase levels rose after they took nimesulide for joint pains. In all patients nimesulide was discontinued, laboratory tests for viral and autoimmune causes of hepatitis were performed, and sufficient follow-up was available.

Results: One patient remained asymptomatic. Four patients presented with symptoms, including fatigue, nausea and vomiting, which had developed several weeks after they began taking nimesulide (median 10 weeks, range 2–13). Hepatocellular injury was observed with median peak serum alanine aminotransferase 15 times the upper limit of normal (range 4–35), reversing to normal 2–4 months after discontinuation of the drug. The remaining patient eveloped symptoms, but continued taking the drug for another 2 weeks. She subsequently developed acute hepatic failure with encephalopathy and hepatorenal syndrome and died 6 weeks after hospitalization. In none of the cases did serological tests for hepatitis A, B and C, Epstein-Barr virus and cytomegalovirus, as well as autoimmune hepatitis reveal findings.

Conclusions: Nimesulide may cause liver damage. The clinical presentation may vary from abnormal liver enzyme levels with no symptoms, to fatal hepatic failure. Therefore, monitoring liver enzymes after initiating therapy with nimesulide seems prudent.

Legal Disclaimer: The information contained in this website is provided for informational purposes only, and should not be construed as legal or medical advice on any matter.
The IMA is not responsible for and expressly disclaims liability for damages of any kind arising from the use of or reliance on information contained within the site.
© All rights to information on this site are reserved and are the property of the Israeli Medical Association. Privacy policy

2 Twin Towers, 35 Jabotinsky, POB 4292, Ramat Gan 5251108 Israel