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עמוד בית
Thu, 30.05.24

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June 2012
I. Shlomi Polachek, L. Huller Harari, M. Baum and R.D. Strous

Background: While many are familiar with postpartum depression, the phenomenon of postpartum post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is less well known and investigated. Objectives: To assess the prevalence of postpartum PTSD in a cohort of women in Israel, and to examine factors affecting its development.

Methods: Eighty-nine women completed several ratings immediately after delivery and one month later. The factors examined related to the pregnancy, childbirth expectations, and delivery. Rating scales comprised evaluations of attachment, personality, PTSD, and demographic variables.

Results: The prevalence of post-partum PTSD was 3.4% (complete PTSD), 7.9% nearly complete PTSD, and 25.9% significant partial disorder. Women who developed PTSD symptoms had a higher prevalence of "traumatic" previous childbirth, with subsequent depression and anxiety. They also reported more medical complications and “mental crises” during pregnancy as well as anticipating more childbirth pain and fear. Instrumental or cesarean deliveries were not associated with PTSD. Most of the women who developed PTSD symptoms delivered vaginally but received fewer analgesics with stronger reported pain. Women with PTSD reported more discomfort with the undressed state, stronger feelings of danger, and higher rates of not wanting more children.

Conclusions: The study results indicate a) the importance of inquiring about previous pregnancy and birthing experiences, b) the need to identify at-risk populations, and c) increased awareness of the disorder. The importance of addressing anticipatory concerns of pain prior to delivery and of respecting the woman’s dignity and minimizing the undressed state during childbirth should not be underestimated. A short questionnaire following childbirth may enable rapid identification of symptoms relevant to PTSD.
 

July 2008
A. Malkiel, P. Mor, H. Aloni, E. Gdansky and S. Grisaru-Granovsky

Background: Intrapartum risk is based mainly on obstetric history, which is lacking in primiparous women.

Objectives: To ascertain whether the traditional known risk of primiparity is an independent variable for both maternal and neonatal outcome.

Methods: All women admitted to labor during March-April 2002 were canvassed for eligibility for participation in the study based on an obstetric risk scoring system developed and validated for our population. During the study period, 1473 women presented for delivery. Of these, 298 women (20%) were eligible according to the exclusion criteria as "low risk" parturients: 135 (45%) were primiparous and 163 (55%) were multiparous (2–5 births).

Results: After correction for significant confounding factors, primiparity was revealed as an independent significant risk factor for instrumental delivery (odds ratio 15.5, 95%confidence interval 1.88–125) and for early postpartum hemorrhage (OR[1] 5.6, 95%CI[2] 1.9–16.6).

Conclusions:
This study highlights early postpartum hemorrhage as a significant risk for primiparous women, independent of mode of delivery, and also confirms previous reports of maternal complications requiring transfer from birth centers/home deliveries to tertiary centers.






[1] OR = odds ratio

[2] CI = confidence interval


December 2006
June 2006
S. Eilat-Tsanani, A. Merom, S. Romano, A. Reshef, I. Lavi and H. Tabenkin
 Background: Postpartum depression is a well-known phenomenon that occurs in about 10% of births and affects the quality of life of the mother as well as the family. As in other cases of depression, under-diagnosis of PPD[1] may keep patients from getting proper care and increase their physical and emotional distress.

Objectives: To identify patients with PPD and to describe their consultation patterns with primary care physicians for themselves and their babies.

Methods: Using a telephone survey and the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale questionnaire we identified PPD in a sample of women who gave birth in HaEmek Medical Center. We also assessed the extent to which the women consulted with family physicians, gynecologists and/or pediatricians.

Results: The survey included 574 women, of whom 9.9% were diagnosed with PPD. There was a higher rate of PPD among Arab compared to Jewish women, among women with a prior history of depression, among women whose pregnancy was unplanned, among those who described the course of pregnancy as “difficult,” and among women who described their general health as “not good.” Women with PPD consulted more with family physicians and pediatricians. The reasons for the consultations are physical and emotional. There were cases of somatization manifested directly by the mother or indirectly through the baby.

Conclusions: Women with PPD have higher consultation rates than those without. By asking a few simple questions it is possible to identify a significant proportion of women with PPD.


 





[1] PPD = postpartum depression


October 2004
M. Korem, Z. Ackerman, Y. Sciaki-Tamir, G. Gino, S. Salameh-Giryes, S. Perlberg and S.N. Heyman
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