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עמוד בית
Thu, 23.05.24

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June 2014
Haim Shmuely MD, Morad Wattad MD, Alejandro Solodky MD, Jacob Yahav MD, Zmira Samra PhD and Nili Zafrir MD
 Background: The relationship between Helicobacter pylori infection and coronary artery disease (CAD) has as yet not been fully examined. The myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI) stress test has proven its efficacy as an integral part of diagnosing CAD.


Objectives: To investigate the association between CAD and H. pylori infection using MPI.

Methods: This prospective study evaluated CAD positivity among consecutive patients referred to a tertiary medical center for a stress/rest MPI. All patients were tested for serum anti-H. pylori and CagA protein immunoglobulin G antibodies. The CAD-positive group included patients with ischemia and/or myocardial infarctions (MI) on a stress MPI, coronary artery bypass graft surgery (CABG) or percutaneous coronary interventions (PCI). CAD-negative subjects were defined as participants with a normal MPI, no pathological Q waves in resting ECG tracing, and no history of CAD. Both groups were compared for H. pylori and CagA seropositivity. Patients’ demographic data, risk factors for CAD, and childhood socioeconomic status were recorded.

Results: The study group consisted of 300 consecutive patients, 170 men and 130 women; 64% (110/173) CAD-positive patients and 47% (60/127) CAD-negative participants were found seropositive for H. pylori infection (P = 0.005). In the adjusted analysis, H. pylori infection was found to be associated with CAD- positive (odds ratio 1.83, 95% confidence interval 1.06–3.17, P = 0.031), and MI (fixed perfusion defects on MPI) (OR 3.36, 95%CI 1.44–7.84, P = 0.005). No association was noted with CagA positivity.

Conclusions: In patients undergoing a stress MPI, serum anti-H. pylori antibodies positivity was found to be associated with CAD, independent of traditional cardiovascular risk factors. 

December 2013
Yacov Shacham, Eran Leshem-Rubinow and Arie Roth
 Studies on trials conducted before the use of thrombolysis demonstrated both short- and long-term benefits of beta-blockers, and one meta-analysis of those trials showed a 25% reduction in 1 year mortality. Treatment with beta-blockers was and continues to be recommended for patients following ST elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI), but many patients failed to receive these agents, mostly because physicians were unconvinced of their benefit. A similar analysis of the studies in STEMI patients treated with thrombolysis also showed an overall 23% reduction in mortality associated with β-blocker use in the era of primary percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). In the present review, we examine the relationship between the pharmacology of β-blockers and their potential utility in order to review early trials on their post-infarct efficacy and to place these findings in the context of this specific patient population in the era of primary PCI.

April 2013
S. Sclarovsky
 In acute myocardial ischemic syndrome the electrocardiogram is capable of providing sophisticated information on coronary artery anatomy (the culprit artery, the level of obstruction, the arterial dimension), along with the hemodynamics, molecular biological characteristics and ionic changes that occur in the involved and uninvolved ischemic musculature. In acute myocardial ischemia, during a sudden obstruction of a distal co-dominant right coronary artery the ECG may be able to discriminate between physiological and pathological remodeling, providing predictive information to differentiate low from high risk cases during acute inferior wall infarction.

 

December 2012
Y. Shacham, E.Y. Birati, O. Rogovski, Y. Cogan, G. Keren and A. Roth

Background: The 20%–60% rate of acute anterior myocardial infarction (AAMI) patients with concomitant left ventricular thrombus (LVT) formation dropped to 10–20% when thrombolysis and primary percutaneous coronary intervention (PPCI) were introduced.

Objective: To test our hypothesis that prolonged anticoagulation post-PPCI will lower the LVT incidence even further.

Methods: Included in this study were all 296 inpatients with ST elevation AAMI who were treated with PPCI (from January 2006 to December 2009). Treatment included heparin anticoagulation (48 hours) followed by adjusted doses of low molecular weight heparin (3 more days). All patients underwent cardiac echocardiography on admission and at discharge. LVT and bleeding complications were reviewed and compared.

Results: LVT formation was present on the first echocardiogram in 6/296 patients. Another 8/289 patients displayed LVT only on their second echocardiogram (4.7%, 14/296). LVT patients had significantly lower LV ejection fractions than non-LVT patients at admission (P < 0.003) and at discharge (P < 0.001), and longer time to reperfusion (P = 0.168). All patients were epidemiologically and clinically similar. There were 6 bleeding episodes that required blood transfusion and 11 episodes of minor bleeding.

Conclusions: Five days of continuous anticoagulation therapy post-PPCI in inpatients with AAMI is associated with low LVT occurrence without remarkably increasing bleeding events.
 

August 2012
A. Shturman, A. Bickel and S. Atar

Background: The prognostic value of P-wave duration has been previously evaluated by signal-averaged ECG (SAECG) in patients with various arrhythmias not associated with acute myocardial infarction (AMI).

Objectives: To investigate the clinical correlates and prognostic value of P-wave duration in patients with ST elevation AMI (STEMI).

Methods: The patients (n=89) were evaluated on the first, second and third day after admission, as well as one week and one month post-AMI. Survival was determined 2 years after the index STEMI.

Results: In comparison with the upper normal range of P-wave duration (< 120 msec), the P-wave duration in STEMI patients was significantly increased on the first day (135.31 ¡À 29.29 msec, P < 0.001), up to day 7 (127.17 ¡À 30.02 msec, P = 0.0455). The most prominent differences were observed in patients with left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) ¡Ü 40% (155.47 ¡À 33.8 msec), compared to LVEF > 40% (128.79 ¡À 28 msec) (P = 0.001). P-wave duration above 120 msec was significantly correlated with increased complication rate namely, sustained ventricular tachyarrhythmia (36%), congestive heart failure (41%), atrial fibrillation (11%), recurrent angina (14%), and re-infarction (8%) (P = 0.012, odds ratio 4.267, 95% confidence interval 1.37¨C13.32). P-wave duration of 126 msec on the day of admission was found to have the highest predictive value for in-hospital complications including LVEF < 40% (area under the curve 0.741, P < 0.001).  However, we did not find a significant correlation between P-wave duration and mortality after multivariate analysis.

Conclusions: P-wave duration as evaluated by SAECG correlates negatively with LVEF post- STEMI, and P-wave duration above 126 msec can be utilized as a non-invasive predictor of in-hospital complications and low LVEF following STEMI.

August 2011
E.Y. Birati and A. Roth

Telemedicine is the application of advanced telecommunication technology for diagnostic, monitoring and therapeutic purposes. It enables data transmission from the patient's whereabouts or his/her primary care provider to a specialized medical call center. Telecardiology is a highly developed medical discipline involving almost every aspect of cardiology, including acute coronary syndromes, arrhythmias, congestive heart failure, sudden cardiac arrest and others. Israel is one of the leading countries in the use of telecardiology, achieving both extended survival, improvement of the patient's quality of life, and significant reduction in health costs. 

June 2011
M. Abu-Tailakh, S. Weitzman and Y. Henkin

Background: The incidence and prevalence of coronary heart disease (CHD) among Bedouins living in the Negev region was very low until the 1960s. During the past 50 years this pattern has changed: in parallel to the changes in lifestyle and nutrition in the Bedouin population, a rapid increase in incidence and mortality from CHD occurred. The relationship between the rise in CHD incidence and the degree of urbanization in this population has not been investigated to date. The study hypothesis was that the prevalence of risk factors and the outcome of myocardial infarction in Bedouins differ between those settled in permanent villages and those remaining in unrecognized villages.

Objectives: To compare the prevalence of cardiovascular risk factors, clinical characteristics, and in-hospital management of a first acute myocardial infarction (AMI) in two Bedouin groups: those residing in permanent villages versus those residing in unrecognized villages.

Methods: We conducted a retrospective analysis of in-hospital data of 352 patients admitted with a first AMI during the period 1997–2003 to Soroka Medical Center, the only medical facility in the region.

Results: There were no differences between the two groups regarding the major cardiovascular risk factors and outcome. A relatively greater number of patients from urban areas underwent catheterization of any sort during their hospitalization (primary, rescue, and risk stratification; P = 0.038). No significant difference was found between the two groups in the type of catheterization performed (P = 0.279).

Conclusions: We found no differences in the clinical characteristics and in-hospital management of patients with AMI between Bedouins residing in permanent villages versus unrecognized villages.

April 2011
A. Lubovich, H. Hamood, S. Behar and U. Rosenschein

Background: Rapid reperfusion of an infarct-related artery is crucial for the successful treatment of ST elevation myocardial infarction. Every effort should be made to shorten door-to-balloon time.

Objectives: To investigate whether bypassing the emergency room (ER) has a positive influence on door-to-balloon time in patients presenting with ST elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) and whether the reduction in door-to-balloon time improves patients’ clinical outcome.

Methods: We analyzed data of 776 patients with STEMI[1] from the 2004 and the 2006 Acute Coronary Syndrome Israeli Survey (ACSIS) registry. The ACSIS[2] is a biennial survey on acute myocardial infarction performed in all 25 intensive cardiac care units in Israel during a 2-month period. Twenty-five percent of patients (193 of 776) arrived directly to the intensive cardiac care unit (ICCU) and 75% (583 of 776) were assessed first in the ER[3]. We compared door-to-balloon time, ejection fraction, 30 days MACE (major adverse cardiac and cerebrovascular events) and 30 days mortality in the two study groups.

Results: There was significantly shorter door-to-balloon time in the direct ICCU group as compared with the ER group (45 vs. 79 minutes, P < 0.002). Patients in the direct ICCU group were more likely to have door-to-balloon time of less than 90 minutes in accordance with ACC/AHA guidelines (88.7% vs. 59.2%, P < 0.0001). Moreover, patients in the direct ICCU group were less likely to have left ventricular ejection fraction < 30% (5.4% vs. 12.2%, P = 0.045) and less likely to have symptoms of overt congestive heart failure. Lastly, 30 days MACE[4] was significantly lower in the direct ICCU group (22 vs. 30%, P < 0.004).

Conclusions: There is significant reduction of the door-to-balloon time in the direct ICCU admission strategy. This reduction translates into improvement in clinical outcome of patients. It is reasonable to apply the direct ICCU strategy to patients with STEMI.






[1] STEMI = ST elevation myocardial infarction



[2] ACSIS = Acute Coronary Syndrome Israeli Survey



[3] ER = emergency room



[4] MACE = major adverse cardiac and cerebrovascular events


November 2010
A. Finkelstein, S. Schwartzenberg, L. Bar, Y. Levy, A. Halkin, I. Herz, S. Bazan, R. Massachi, S. Banai, G. Keren and J. George

Background: ST-elevation myocardial infarction is caused by occlusive coronary thrombosis where antecedent plaque disruption occurs. When treating STEMI[1] the main goal is to achieve prompt reperfusion of the infarction area. Several studies have demonstrated the efficacy of an aspiration device before percutaneous coronary intervention in patients with acute myocardial infarction.

Objectives: To determine the added value of thrombus aspiration prior to primary PCI[2] by comparing AMI[3] patients with totally occluded infarct-related artery treated with routine primary PCI to those treated with extraction device prior to primary PCI.

Methods: The study group comprised 122 consecutive patients with AMI and a totally occluded infarct artery (TIMI flow 0) who underwent primary PCI. The patients were divided into two groups: 68 who underwent primary PCI only (control group) and 54 who underwent primary thrombus extraction with an extraction device before PCI (extraction group). Baseline clinical and lesion characteristics were similar in both groups. Final TIMI grade flow and myocardial blush as well as 1 year mortality, target lesion revascularization, recurrent myocardial infarction, unstable angina and stroke were compared between the two groups.

Results: Primary angiographic results were better for the extraction group versus the control group: final grade 3 TIMI flow was 100% vs. 95.6% (P = 0.03) and final grade 3 myocardial blush grade 50% vs. 41.18% (although P was not significant). Long-term follow-up total MACE[4] showed a non-significant positive trend in the extraction group (12.96% vs. 24.71%, P = 0.26).

Conclusions: The use of extraction devices for intracoronary thrombectomy during primary PCI in patients with totally occluded infarct artery significantly improved epicardial reperfusion in the infarct-related vessel and showed a trend for more favorable long-term outcome.






[1] STEMI = ST-elevation myocardial infarction



[2] PCI = percutaneous coronary intervention



[3] AMI = acute myocardial infarction



[4] MACE = major adverse cardiac event


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