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עמוד בית
Sun, 21.07.24

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March 2024
Jill Savren Lotker MD, Ariel Roguin MD PhD, Arthur Kerner MD, Erez Marcusohn MD, Ofer Kobo MD PhD

Background: Patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) are at increased risk after percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI).

Objectives: To compare the clinical outcomes within 30 days, one year, and five years of undergoing PCI.

Methods: We conducted a retrospective cohort study of adult patients with IBD who underwent PCI in a tertiary care center from January 2009 to December 2019.

Results: We included 44 patients, 26 with Crohn’s disease (CD) and 18 with ulcerative colitis (UC), who underwent PCI. Patients with CD underwent PCI at a younger age compared to UC (57.8 vs. 68.9 years, P < 0.001) and were more likely to be male (88.46% of CD vs. 61.1% of UC, P < 0.03). CD patients had a higher rate of non-steroidal treatment compared to UC patients (50% vs. 5.56%, P < 0.001). Acute coronary syndromes (ACS) and/or the need for revascularization (e.g., PCI) were the most common clinical events to occur following PCI, in both groups. Of patients who experienced ACS and/or unplanned revascularization within 5 years, 25% of UC vs. 40% of CD had target lesion failure (TLF) due to in-stent restenosis and 10% of CD had TLF due to stent thrombosis.

Conclusions: We observed higher rates of TLF in IBD patients compared to the general population as well as differences in clinical outcomes between UC and CD patients. A better understanding of the prognostic factors and pathophysiology of these differences may have clinical importance in tailoring the appropriate treatment or type of revascularization for this high-risk group.

February 2022
Erez Marcusohn MD, Maria Postnikov MD, Ofer Kobo MD, Yaron Hellman MD, Diab Mutlak MD, Danny Epstein MD, Yoram Agmon MD, Lior Gepstein MD PHD, and Robert Zukermann MD

Background: The diagnosis of atrial fibrillation (AFIB) related cardiomyopathy relies on ruling out other causes for heart failure and on recovery of left ventricular (LV) function following return to sinus rhythm (SR). The pathophysiology underlying this pathology is multifactorial and not as completely known as the factors associated with functional recovery following the restoration of SR.

Objectives: To identify clinical and echocardiographic factors associated with LV systolic function improvement following electrical cardioversion (CV) or after catheter ablation in patients with reduced ejection fraction (EF) related to AFIB and normal LV function at baseline.

Methods: The study included patients with preserved EF at baseline while in SR whose LVEF had reduced while in AFIB and improved LVEF following CV. We compared patients who had improved LVEF to normal baseline to those who did not.

Results: Eighty-six patients with AFIB had evidence of reduced LV systolic function and improved EF following return to SR. Fifty-five (64%) returned their EF to baseline. Patients with a history of ischemic heart disease (IHD), worse LV function, and larger LV size during AFIB were less likely to return to normal LV function. Multivariant analysis revealed that younger patients with slower ventricular response, a history of IHD, larger LV size, and more significant deterioration of LVEF during AFIB were less likely to recover their EF to baseline values.

Conclusions: Patients with worse LV function and larger left ventricle during AFIB are less likely to return their baseline LV function following the restoration of sinus rhythm.

September 2019
Erez Marcusohn MD, Danny Epstein MD, Anees Musallam MD, Zohar Keidar MD PHD and Ariel Roguin MD PHD

Background: With the recent introduction of high-sensitivity troponin (hsTn), the incremental benefit of stress myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI) in the evaluation of patients who present to the emergency department (ED) with acute coronary syndrome (ACS) is unclear.

Objectives: To assess the added value of stress MPI in low-risk ACS patients with normal range hsTnI.

Methods: We analyzed all patients who were hospitalized at our medical center from February 2016 to November 2017, who presented with low-risk ACS and underwent stress MPI, and in whom hsTnI was in the normal range after the introduction of hsTnI.

Results: During the study period, 161 patients were admitted with a diagnosis of unstable angina (i.e., ACS with normal range hsTnI) and underwent stress MPI during index admission. The study population included 52/161 patients (31.7%) with low-risk ACS who had no indication for initial invasive strategy. No patients had positive MPI. One patient underwent coronary angiography due to suggestive history; however, he did not have a significant coronary artery disease and had no indication for percutaneous coronary intervention.

Conclusions: In patients with low-risk ACS and normal range hsTnI without additional high-risk features, stress MPI has little additional value for the correct diagnosis and management. Prospective studies are warranted to confirm whether resting hsTnI could serve as a powerful triage tool in chest pain patients in the ED before diagnostic testing and thus, improve patient management.

August 2016
Aharon Kessel MD, Yael Graif MD, Zahava Vadasz MD, Vered Schichter-Konfino MD, Meital Almog MD, Shai Cohen MD, Valery Teplitski MD, Nili Stein MPH, Ilaria Baiardini PhD, Marcus Maurer MD and Elias Toubi MD

Background: Chronic urticaria (CU) is a common disabling disorder. The CU-Q2oL (Chronic Urticaria Quality of Life Questionnaire) is a specific questionnaire for evaluating quality of life in CU patients. It consists of 23 items divided into six quality-of-life dimensions. It was initially developed in Italy and later validated in other countries.

Objectives: To validate and adapt the CU-Q2oL to the Hebrew language in order to make it suitable for use in Israel. 

Methods: The CU-Q2oL questionnaire was translated to Hebrew. A group of 119 CU patients were asked to complete this version, in addition to the Dermatology Life Quality Index (DLQI) and Urticaria Activity Score (UAS) questionnaires. A factorial analysis was performed to identify CU-Q2oL subscales, internal consistency and convergent validity assessment, as well as factors determining quality-of-life scores.

Results: The factor analysis identified six scales of the Israeli CU-Q2oL: (i) sleep and concentration, (ii) function and mental status, (iii) embarrassment and clothing limitations, (iv) itching, (v) eating behavior and medication side effects, and (vi) swelling, which accounted for 77% of the data variance. Five scales showed good internal consistency over 0.81. The mean ± SD score of CU-Q2oL in our patients with CIU was 41 ± 21.7. We found a strong positive correlation between the overall scores of CU-Q2oL and DLQI questionnaires (r = 0.8, P < 0.01). Additionally, we found a positive correlation between UAS and both CU-Q2oL and DLQI (r = 0.62, P < 0.01, and r = 0.53, P < 0.01, respectively). 

Conclusions: This study demonstrates that the Israeli CU-Q2oL questionnaire is suitable for both clinical use and research in Israel.

 

December 2014
Ronit Marcus MD, Eli Shiloah MD, Avi Mizrahi MD, Osnat Gerah-Yehoshua and Micha J. Rapoport MD
December 2009
May 2008
November 2004
J. Levy, M. Puterman, T. Lifshitz, M. Marcus, A. Segal and T. Monos

Background: In patients with Graves’ ophthalmopathy, orbital decompression surgery is indicated for compressive optic neuropathy, severe corneal exposure, or for cosmetic deformity due to proptosis. Traditionally this has been performed through a transantral approach, but the associated complication rate is high. More recently, endoscopic orbital decompression has been performed successfully with significantly fewer postoperative complications.

Objective: To report our experience of endoscopic orbital decompression in patients with severe Graves’ ophthalmopathy.

Methods: Three patients (five eyes) underwent endoscopic orbital decompression for Graves’ ophthalmopathy at Soroka Medical Center between the years 2000 and 2002. The indications for surgery were compressive optic neuropathy in three eyes, severe corneal exposure in one eye, and severe proptosis not cosmetically acceptable for the patient in one case. An intranasal endoscopic approach with the removal of the medial orbital wall and medial part of the floor was performed.

Results: In all five eyes an average reduction of 5 mm in proptosis was achieved. Soon after surgery, visual acuity improved in the three cases with compressive optic neuropathy, and exposure keratopathy and cosmetic appearance improved. The diplopia remained unchanged. No complications were observed postoperatively.

Conclusions: Endoscopic orbital decompression with removal of the medial orbital wall and medial part of the floor in the five reported eyes was an effective and safe procedure for treatment of severe Graves’ ophthalmopathy. A close collaboration between ophthalmologists and otorhinolaryngologists skilled in endoscopic sinus surgery is crucial for the correct management of these patients.

November 2003
A. Halevy, A. Stepanasky, Z. Halpern, I. Wasserman, Z. Chen-Levy, S. Pytlovich, O. Marcus, A. Mor, P. Hagag, T. Horne, S. Polypodi and J. Sandbank

Background: Among the various new technologies in the field of parathyroid surgery are intraoperative quick parathormone measurements.

Objectives: To evaluate the contribution of QPTH[1] measurements during parathyroidectomy to the achievement of higher success rates. 

Methods: QPTH assay using Immulite Turbo Intact PTH[2] was measured in 32 patients undergoing parathyroidectomy: 30 for primary and 2 for secondary hyperparathyroidism.  QPTH levels were measured at time 0 minutes (before incision) and at 10, 20, and 30 minutes after excision of the hyperfunctioning gland.  Only a drop of 60% or more from the 0’ level was considered to be a positive result.

Results: The mean QPTH level at time 0’ for PHPT[3] patients was 38.12 ± 25.15 pmol/L (range 9.1–118 pmol/L).  At 10 minutes post-excision of the hyperfunctioning gland (or glands), QPTH dropped by a mean of 73.80% to 9.89 ± 18.78 pmol/L. 

Conclusions: Intraoperative QPTH level measurement is helpful in parathyroid surgery.  A drop of 60% or more from 0’ level indicates a successful procedure, and further exploration should be avoided.






[1] QPTH = quick parathormone



[2] PTH = parathormone



[3] PHPT = primary hyperparathyroidism


September 2002
Alla Shnaider, MD, Anna Basok, MD, Boris Rogachev, MD and Marcus Mostoslavsky, MD
February 2000
Ilan Zahavi MD, Olga Rosezki MD, Yerah Stolkarts MD, Raanan Shamir MD, Bruria Heckelman BSc, Hedva Marcus MSc and Gabriel Dinari MD

Background: Cholestasis is a frequent problem in patients on total parenteral nutrition. Cisapride has a prokinetic effect on the biliary system, but its effect on hepatic excretory function is unknown.

Objectives: To study the effect of cisapride on TPN-induced cholestasis in a rat model.

Methods: Bile flow and bile salt secretion rate were measured in rats given TPN. There were four groups of 8 to 13 animals each. After a one hour baseline period during which all four groups received i.v. saline infusion, two groups received a TPN solution for another 2 hours, while saline was infused in the two control groups.

At the beginning of the second hour, 2 mg/kg cisapride was injected i.v. as a bolus into one experimental and one control group. Bile was collected from the common bile duct.

Results: At the end of the third hour, TPN caused a significant reduction in bile flow (P<0.02) and bile salt secretion rate (P<0.001) (61.24 vs. 50.74 µl/min/kg, and 1.173 vs. 0.799 µmol/min/kg, respectively). Addition of cisapride abolished the cholestatic effect of TPN.

Conclusions: Cisapride has a protective effect against TPN-associated cholestasis. This may have clinical significance, and further studies are warranted.

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TPN= total parenteral nutrition
 

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